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Old 06-07-2012, 04:56 AM   #1
dpalme
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Default Fridge for kegging

Was going to run up north tomorrow and pick up an old fridge I got in the garage of a rental property (nobody living there ) and bring it back to use for chilling down the kegs. My question is do I drill a hole in the side to run a co2 line in, which is how I would prefer to do it, easier to switch out co2 tanks and leave more room in the fridge for beer....but how do you seal it off and protect the co2 line fromm the sheet metal?

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Old 06-07-2012, 05:29 AM   #2
ShinyBuddha
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You could always use some neoprene, towels, denim, etc wrapped sound the line where it enters the fridge then some expanding foam-in-a-can to plug the gap.

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Old 06-07-2012, 07:28 PM   #3
erikpete18
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I've also seen people use a short section of PVC pipe through the side of the fridge to keep the gas line safe. Gas line diameter will determine what size PVC, but you might be able to find one with a fairly tight fit that doesn't need much in the way of insulation around it, maybe just a little caulk on one side.

Also, I'm sure you're probably already considering this, but in case you're not, remember to check for lines in the sides of the fridge. Depending on the make and model, so have coils through the sides, so you'll want to either figure out where they are first, or drill a small pilot hole and check for lines before drilling all the way through. Hate to have you junk your fridge after hauling it all over the place!

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Old 06-08-2012, 12:39 AM   #4
carlisle_bob
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Hi

First thing to do is to see if the fridge will hold 36F for an extended period. If it's not able to do that, no need to proceed.

As long as you drill a clean hole and file / sand off any burrs - there's not much way the line will get cut. People over think this problem all the time.

Bob

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Old 06-10-2012, 04:29 AM   #5
dpalme
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Coils are on the back of the fridge so I don't see that being a problem. This is an old fridge....but I have no Doubt it'll hold the temp, it's been known to freeze water bottles

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