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Old 02-13-2012, 12:36 AM   #1
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Default Force carbonation.... What?

Could be a simple answer. If I force carbonate too 3 volumes at 58 degrees when I drops the temp down to 37 degrees will it still be at 3 volumes c02?

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Old 02-13-2012, 12:40 AM   #2
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It should retain it's carbonation level at the lower temperature. You'll eat up a lot of CO2 doing it at 58F though. You'll also want to check the pressure on the keg before you connect it up to a regulator for serving. If you're already setup to serve at 3 CO2 volumes, why not carbonate in the fridge/keezer/kegorator?? Chances are, you'll need to pull the pressure relief a few times on the keg once it's at temperature (24-48 hours after putting in the 37F environment). Use a keg pressure tester to see where it's at BEFORE you connect up the gas feed.

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Old 02-13-2012, 12:51 AM   #3
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I have no room to bring the temp down to serving standards. So I force carbonate at garage temps. Is that a wrong way to do it. May not be ideal but need to get the job done. Been told my beer was under carbonated by someone who would know. This after I force carb at 58 degrees and THEN put in into the kegerator for a week at 37 degrees and 7lbs for 2 weeks. Thoughts?

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Old 02-13-2012, 12:57 AM   #4
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Your 7lb psi is too little. Raise it to 12 when chilled.

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Old 02-19-2012, 09:28 PM   #5
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I tried force carbing for the first time with no success. I have no idea what went wrong. I put the keg in the fridge hooked up the hose and set the pressure to 30psi for 3 days. Turned off the gas then bled the pressure off 2 times. Turned the gas back on at about 8psi for serving and there is little to no carb in the beer. What gives? Any suggestions welcomed

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Old 02-19-2012, 09:40 PM   #6
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Temperature of the brew??

Also, I get better results either using the 2 week 'set and forget' method, or the one that's a sticky from Bobby_M... Also keep in mind, depending on the temperature the brew is at, 8psi could be giving you the carbonation level you're seeing. Try turning it up to 10psi, give it a few days, and see how that is.

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Old 02-19-2012, 11:58 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Golddiggie View Post
It should retain it's carbonation level at the lower temperature. You'll eat up a lot of CO2 doing it at 58F though. You'll also want to check the pressure on the keg before you connect it up to a regulator for serving. If you're already setup to serve at 3 CO2 volumes, why not carbonate in the fridge/keezer/kegorator?? Chances are, you'll need to pull the pressure relief a few times on the keg once it's at temperature (24-48 hours after putting in the 37F environment). Use a keg pressure tester to see where it's at BEFORE you connect up the gas feed.
Are you saying that it will take more CO2 to carb to 3V at 58F than at, say, 35F? Maybe you can explain that.

We're talking about a measurement of VOLUME. A beer at 3 volumes at 58F will still have the same volume (3) of CO2 at 35F. The change in temperature will change the pressure at the head, not the volume. Volume, pressure, and temperature. Carbing at a higher temperature means you need more pressure to achieve the SAME volume. The same amount of CO2 is be absorbed at either temperature.
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Old 02-20-2012, 12:20 AM   #8
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Temperature does not affect how much CO2 gets used in force carbing.

If you carb to 3 vol at 58 degrees, you'll still have 3 vol at 37 degrees.

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Old 02-20-2012, 03:37 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tektonjp View Post
Are you saying that it will take more CO2 to carb to 3V at 58F than at, say, 35F? Maybe you can explain that.

We're talking about a measurement of VOLUME. A beer at 3 volumes at 58F will still have the same volume (3) of CO2 at 35F. The change in temperature will change the pressure at the head, not the volume. Volume, pressure, and temperature. Carbing at a higher temperature means you need more pressure to achieve the SAME volume. The same amount of CO2 is be absorbed at either temperature.
The temperature of the liquid impacts it's ability to retain the gas in solution. Hence the ability to carbonate to the 3 CO2 volumes using 16psi at 37F, where it takes 30psi to reach the same level at 58F.

The handy-dandy slow force carbonation chart featuring pressure vs. temperature (in degress F)... This is the same chart used to do the 2 week 'set and forget' method of carbonating.

As for MalFet's comment, I don't think so... If you need to push more psi into the keg to obtain the same CO2 volumes level at different temperatures, you will use different amounts of CO2 from the tank.
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Old 02-20-2012, 06:48 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hal9000Beers View Post
I have no room to bring the temp down to serving standards. So I force carbonate at garage temps. Is that a wrong way to do it. May not be ideal but need to get the job done. Been told my beer was under carbonated by someone who would know. This after I force carb at 58 degrees and THEN put in into the kegerator for a week at 37 degrees and 7lbs for 2 weeks. Thoughts?
Carbing at room temp is fine. Just make sure that the pressure you set the keg at to serve corresponds to the carbonation level you want. If you carb it to 3.0 vol at room temp, and then chill it to 37F, you need to serve it at 16psi to maintain that same level of carbonation. If you set it lower, the beer will lose carbonation every time you pour until it reaches equilibrium with the new pressure. FWIW pushing with 7 psi at 37F results in a beer with 2.14 vol of carbonation. You can use the chart goldiggie linked to find the pressure you need for any temp and desired carb level.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Golddiggie View Post
The temperature of the liquid impacts it's ability to retain the gas in solution. Hence the ability to carbonate to the 3 CO2 volumes using 16psi at 37F, where it takes 30psi to reach the same level at 58F.

The handy-dandy slow force carbonation chart featuring pressure vs. temperature (in degress F)... This is the same chart used to do the 2 week 'set and forget' method of carbonating.

As for MalFet's comment, I don't think so... If you need to push more psi into the keg to obtain the same CO2 volumes level at different temperatures, you will use different amounts of CO2 from the tank.
Nope, the amount of CO2 used to carbonate to a specific level is the same regardless of temperature. Yes you need higher pressure to force the gas into solution at higher temps, but that's because the liquid is resisting absorption more. When we talk about carbonation levels we use "volumes" as the unit of measure. This unit refers to how much CO2, by weight, is absorbed in the liquid. 3.0 vol of carbonation means that each liter of fluid has absorbed 6 grams of gas, and 6 grams is going to remain 6 grams no matter what the temperature is.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Golddiggie View Post
Chances are, you'll need to pull the pressure relief a few times on the keg once it's at temperature (24-48 hours after putting in the 37F environment). Use a keg pressure tester to see where it's at BEFORE you connect up the gas feed.
Why would you need to release the pressure? If it's carbed to 3 vol at room temp, as it cools the pressure inside the keg will drop, right in line with the chart you linked. If you know you carbed it to 3.0 vol (using the chart), you can use that same chart and a thermometer to find the exact head pressure in the keg at any given temperature. The only reason you'd need to release pressure is if you want less carbonation.
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