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-   -   Force Carbonation Procedure (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/force-carbonation-procedure-337677/)

anteup 06-25-2012 06:57 PM

Force Carbonation Procedure
 
Beating a dead horse here but first time kegging.
1. Clean and sanatize keg.(No S*** Sherlock)
2. Fill keg with beer.
3. Pressurize keg with 30psi of CO2 and purge to clear out O2.
4. Cool beer at serving temp for 24hrs(36-40degrees)
5. Pressurize keg with 30psi of CO2.
6. Shake/roll to disperse CO2.
7. Store at serving temp for 24hrs.
8. Purge keg.
9. Pressurize keg to serving pressure and store 2-3 day and serving temp.
10. Enjoy

FYI-This is a wheat ale and kegging into a sankey.

day_trippr 06-26-2012 01:52 AM

Quote:

5. Pressurize keg with 30psi of CO2.
6. Shake/roll to disperse CO2.
.
.
.
10. Fail.
11. Start thread "Help! My beer is all foam!"

Cheers! ;)

Golddiggie 06-26-2012 01:58 AM

3. Pressurize keg to 10psi, purge headspace, filling with CO2. If not placing into fridge right away, check keg pressure BEFORE putting into fridge when it's time.
4. Chill beer to serving temperature (~24 hours).
5. Connect CO2 feed and set at serving pressure.
6. Two weeks later, connect to tap and pour a pint to sample. If needed, give more time, or adjust pressure feed to keg.
7. Enjoy keg until it kicks.
8. Rinse (clean keg and lines), repeat.

IME, trying to rapid force carbonate via the high pressure shake and quake method more often results in failure. I've also added the keg pressure check step to my process. This quick step ensures that the keg isn't at too high a pressure at the start of chilling. It also doesn't matter if you use a corny or sanke keg...

tre9er 06-26-2012 02:10 AM

I run about 25-30 psi and shake for 10 seconds, repeat, then put away for 24 hours, bleed, set to serving, and its slightly under carbed by then. I leave it at serving from there on.

I wish I had more patience.

Golddiggie 06-26-2012 02:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tre9er (Post 4201972)
I run about 25-30 psi and shake for 10 seconds, repeat, then put away for 24 hours, bleed, set to serving, and its slightly under carbed by then. I leave it at serving from there on.

I wish I had more patience.

It helps to have more spots for kegs than you have faucets. :D I have room for four kegs in my brew fridge, and three faucets through the door. So, I can always have one keg carbonating while enjoying three others. By the time one kicks, the keg in the carbonating spot is ready, and I can put another in it's place. :ban:

tre9er 06-26-2012 02:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Golddiggie

It helps to have more spots for kegs than you have faucets. :D I have room for four kegs in my brew fridge, and three faucets through the door. So, I can always have one keg carbonating while enjoying three others. By the time one kicks, the keg in the carbonating spot is ready, and I can put another in it's place. :ban:

My kegs haven't been lasting two Weeks :drunk: doesn't help that I serve friends too. I'm so nice

wilsojos 06-26-2012 02:21 AM

I cold crash for 3 days, put in keg, hit with 30 to seat seals, purge, set at 30 for 24 hours, purge, set to serving pressure. Usually ready in 5-7 days. Set and forget at serving pressure for 3 weeks is more reliable and less risky if you can wait that long.

homebeerbrewer 06-26-2012 02:23 AM

I charge/purge, then put on carbonation pressure for a minimum of two weeks. For example, IPA's are best at 2 volumes, which is about 16-17 PSI at 60F. Wheat beers are best at 3.5 volumes, or 43-44 PSI at 60 F. I calculate at 60 F because that's currently the temp in my "cold room" in the basement. Winter temps are just below 50 F, so I adjust accordingly. I just set it, and forget it, until my next batch is kegged.

I do have quite a pipeline, so the two weeks doesn't bother me. Plus, it fits my brewing schedule.

Golddiggie 06-26-2012 02:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tre9er (Post 4202008)
My kegs haven't been lasting two Weeks :drunk: doesn't help that I serve friends too. I'm so nice

Well, I'm pretty much the only one drinking my homebrew from tap. I do take some to family (mom loves my IPA's and ESB's) but otherwise, I enjoy it. Once in a while, I'll let a friend have a bottle from a tap, but that's rather rare. I do offer to let them drink from the tap, they just need to get up here.

Still, most of the time, it takes me more than two weeks to kick a 3 gallon keg. Although my MO SMaSH is in danger of being finished very fast.

Once I've moved, I plan on getting a keezer where I'll be able to also have 5 gallon kegs. I also plan on brewing larger batches, which will mean filling either three 3 gallon kegs, or two 5 gallon kegs (at a minimum). :rockin: Only a couple of months away from that (fingers crossed)...

tre9er 06-26-2012 02:30 AM

I've stepped up to around 9 gallon batches (euro keg-gle) and I have three 5g cornies and 4 ale pails. I've always got another beer ready, but I also really want to start drinking the new model :D


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