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Old 12-11-2008, 09:11 AM   #11
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+1 on head games- The other reason is even if your force carb, your beer is still absorbing CO2. I think the issue is natural carbing you are forced to wait until it is done, where as force carbing you can jump the gun and still have decent carbing. A week later, under proper balancing, the force carb will be just like the natural carb.My spin on it anyway.



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Old 12-11-2008, 02:48 PM   #12
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I've never noticed a difference if the kegs are aged the same and the carbonation level is the same.



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Old 12-12-2008, 08:42 PM   #13
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according to the brewmaster i talked to that has a degree in brewing from munich where he was born and raised you lose aroma and flavor buy force carbing he recomended waiting till about the last 1 % of fermentation and the kegging and letting the last bit of fermentation to occur a truly free way to carb i have not done this yet so im not sure about pressure release but this makes sense to me

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Old 12-12-2008, 09:08 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrewDey View Post
...It does seem that only natural carbing gives you that smaller bead, and the nice lacing...
Uh...I'll have to disagree.

I've no issues with a rocky head and thick lacing with force carb'd beers. If someone has weak body in their beer, it's most likely a recipe / process issue.

As far as a taste difference. I've tasted a difference between a force carb'd keg and a naturally primed keg. The second taste difference was easy to identify...yeasty. Consider that your primed beer is sitting on a new yeast cake (created by the priming process) while your force carb'd keg should be relatively clean of excess yeast.

So yes...you can have a crystal clear beer with a thick foamy head and rich lacing by force carbing.

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Old 12-12-2008, 09:32 PM   #15
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"They say that the avergae homebrewer quits after 3 years..."


1.) Who are "they"? I have yet to meet a Homebrewer that has just up and quit after 3 years. Now, some have had some MAJOR life changes that FORCED them to quit. But even then, those are rare.

Most of the HB'er I have know either tossed the bucket after a year or have been doing this for as long as it's been possible.

2.) What the hell is an "avergae"? Is that Belgian or more like Saison?

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Old 12-21-2010, 12:53 AM   #16
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Default help with kegging!

Hey guys im really green at this whole brewing scene. But i am very anxious to learn and i already have 5 cornies with the co2 setup. Im going to keg my next batch to go in my new kegerator. As for natural carbing in kegs. Will i need to burp the keg and then hook up co2 for dispensing. Or will the keg have enough pressure to dispense naturally.

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Old 12-21-2010, 01:52 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by PoorBoyBrew View Post
Hey guys im really green at this whole brewing scene. But i am very anxious to learn and i already have 5 cornies with the co2 setup. Im going to keg my next batch to go in my new kegerator. As for natural carbing in kegs. Will i need to burp the keg and then hook up co2 for dispensing. Or will the keg have enough pressure to dispense naturally.
A fully (properly) carbonated keg will have enough residual pressure to push out maybe a pint. The more full the keg...the less headspace and the less excess pressure available to push the beer.

Once you're keg is fully carb'd, chill it for 30 hours and then burp and hook up the gas to dispense. Room temperature beer that is carbonated will me much more unruly than when it is chilled.
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Old 01-10-2011, 01:57 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by contagent93 View Post
according to the brewmaster i talked to that has a degree in brewing from munich where he was born and raised you lose aroma and flavor buy force carbing he recomended waiting till about the last 1 % of fermentation and the kegging and letting the last bit of fermentation to occur a truly free way to carb i have not done this yet so im not sure about pressure release but this makes sense to me
that sounds interesting. Or you might be able to also add a bit of priming even after finishing fermentation when you keg it. Just enough to ferm for a day or so in the keg then force carb. I just did this on my second keg since I needed to keg it and ran out of C02. After I get it tommorrow I will hook it up to the c02.


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