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Old 01-11-2012, 09:48 PM   #1
MikeMetroka
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Default Force Carb vs. Conditioning

I have been force carbonating thus far and not very happy with the results.
I apply 25 psi and shake gently for 10 min listening to co2 hiss.
According to, and I agree with the "sticky" with the chart showing that things settle down in the 2-3 week range. I'm usually serving the day after the force but not happy with the results for a couple weeks.

I'm considering conditioning in the keg with DME.
That would take a good 2 weeks, correct?

What are your thought on force carb vs. keg conditioning?

Cheers,
Mike



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Old 01-11-2012, 10:00 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeMetroka View Post
I have been force carbonating thus far and not very happy with the results.
I apply 25 psi and shake gently for 10 min listening to co2 hiss.
According to, and I agree with the "sticky" with the chart showing that things settle down in the 2-3 week range. I'm usually serving the day after the force but not happy with the results for a couple weeks.
Hitting it with 25+ PSI and shaking the keg is known as burst carbonating, not force carbonating. Force carbonation is done by chilling the beer and attaching the gas (typically at 12-PSI or so) then letting it carb up slowly over a period of about 2 weeks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeMetroka View Post
I'm considering conditioning in the keg with DME.
That would take a good 2 weeks, correct?

What are your thought on force carb vs. keg conditioning?
Carbing naturally using priming sugar or force carbing with C02 both work great. I use both methods with good results. Usually takes about 2 weeks for the beer to be fully carbed using either of these methods.

Burst carbing can work in a pinch but you may get unexpected results if you're not careful. It's possible to over-carbonate very easily using this method.


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Old 01-11-2012, 10:00 PM   #3
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Patience is a virtue.....that being said....my standard operating procedure is for ales and most lagers - carb under 30# for 24 hours, then lower it to around 12# for another 24 hours and enjoy. For my porter I do 20# for 24 hours and enjoy. I typically serve at 9-12# of pressure and have good results.

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Old 01-11-2012, 10:04 PM   #4
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Condition the keg for three weeks before you even think of putting the beer in the kegerator. Same as a bottle. Green beer, is green beer. I agree with Seven. Hook it up and leave it alone for 2-3 weeks. You can't hurry the process and then not be happy with the results.

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Old 01-11-2012, 10:51 PM   #5
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I tried the "burst" carbing a couole of times. Now I ser it at the proper pressure for the appropriate CO2 volume and let it sit for 2 weeks. try it, you will be surprised with the result.

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Old 01-11-2012, 11:15 PM   #6
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I just keg the beer, give it a little shot of co2 (to make sure the lid is seated and there are no leaks), and place it in the kegerator at 12 psi with the other kegs. It's pretty decently carbed at about day 7-10, but it gets better over the next few days.

I don't shake the keg, as I hate that "carbonic acid bite" I've had when I've burst carbed in the past.

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Old 01-11-2012, 11:37 PM   #7
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I don't shake the keg, as I hate that "carbonic acid bite" I've had when I've burst carbed in the past.
I've noticed this too. I don't think i will do the keg shake thing again. On our first ipa we set it to 30 for 24 hours, then set to ten. After about a week it was drinkable, but has definitely improved after yet another week. I think the key is patience, and having a keg carbonating while drinking the already carbed and conditioned beer.
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Old 01-12-2012, 01:10 AM   #8
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I am pretty new to kegging...maybe 8 kegs down so far. I have burst carb them all - chilled to 39 degrees, 100 seconds on 30 psi while rolling back and forth on my knees while seated - which has actually worked pretty well and consistent. I haven't overcarbed once yet.

But I am thinking there are two factors at work here. Green beer is green beer, so time will help whether carbed in a keg or sitting in secondary. And there is a carbonation maturity that happens after a week or two, even in a beer that has been burst carb. They just start to settle, and the carbonation is creamier and stays in the beer longer. I just say this because it was confusing to me because at first when I was trying to find info on this topic, these two "maturity" issues were mixed, at least in my brain.

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Old 01-12-2012, 01:48 AM   #9
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So you set it to 12 psi and then stick in the fridge and wait 2 weeks? Or let it wait at room temp?

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Old 01-12-2012, 09:14 AM   #10
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So you set it to 12 psi and then stick in the fridge and wait 2 weeks? Or let it wait at room temp?
In the fridge...the lower the temp, the lower the PSI needed.

Cheers


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