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Old 10-05-2012, 03:19 PM   #11
porcupine73
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Here's a test the home consumer can do, the taste test. Take some spring water and bubble the co2 through it for a while then taste the water. If it has a rubbery or any other off taste - bam there you go don't use it if you don't want your beer to taste like that. The taste test rigs usually they have a pin lock keg they put the water in, then bubble/pressurize that with CO2, then draw some out to taste.

Right sometimes the industrial grade products have higher purity requirements than medical or food grade. Sometimes there are other quality tests done that aren't done on industrial grade, such as the benzene mentioned above.

I've also seen a FCC (Food Chemicals Codex) grade CO2. The beverage grade checking for benzene was mainly pushed by Coke and Pepsi some years back, I think that was around the time random samples of beverages in stores were turning up benzene, but it was thought those products contained potassium benzoate as a preservative that was breaking down into benzene.

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Old 10-05-2012, 03:19 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xmacro View Post
Damn, good post; bumping this for newcomers
No offense, but a quick Google search for the info in that post doesn't pull up anything but reposts of that same material. Plus it comes from someone with a single post... raises all kinds of red flags for me as to the validity of the statement.
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Old 10-05-2012, 04:06 PM   #13
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Are you referring to the statement about the benzene?

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Old 10-05-2012, 04:29 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IffyG View Post
No offense, but a quick Google search for the info in that post doesn't pull up anything but reposts of that same material. Plus it comes from someone with a single post... raises all kinds of red flags for me as to the validity of the statement.
Hmm, good point.

I did some digging and found a few more threads (all from this forum, which is the reason I joined )

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/food-grade-c02-260588/
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/food-grade-co2-18805/
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/food-grade-co2-vs-industrial-co2-199270/
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/co2-kegging-322631/
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/there-such-thing-industrial-co2-180925/
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/what-type-co2-do-i-need-220097/

Tons of opinions:

- some say welders/industrial is more pure than food grade because welders get screwed up with impurities
- others say that food grade is more pure and that industrial has an argon gas mix
- still others say that industrial is the same as food grade, that they're the same thing
- minority opinion is that industrial contains machine oil; this is unsubstantiated though and it may be the posters were thinking of paintball CO2, which no one seems to recommend using

Others say an inline filter will take care of any impurities out there, others say the gas doesn't matter, the cleanliness of the tank is what matters

All in all, very confusing
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Old 10-05-2012, 04:50 PM   #15
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Yeah I read some very conflicting things when I first built up my keezer. To add another thing to the list, I've heard a bunch of people say that their local welding shop and beverage supply stores both use CO2 recovered from a large brewery (ex AB).

Here's what I did, to try and balance practicality with these potential safety issues:
1) I can easily imagine some contamination issues coming from sketchy old steel tanks, so I bought a new aluminum cylinder that I never swap. I also chose a regulator with integrated check valves.
2) As a CO2 supplier I chose a local fire extinguisher shop that's known for filling cylinders for home kegerators (I found out about the shop via a homebrew club's web site, and the guy at the shop told me they fill tons of tanks for homebrewers). I figured if their CO2 was a problem, somebody would have noticed by now.

If you know your tank is clean, but you suspect your CO2 is giving the beer off-flavors, I'd just switch sources. If you're lucky enough to live near a major city, there's probably one or two welding/homebrew/fire extinguisher shops that the majority of homebrewers use, so ask around.

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Old 10-05-2012, 09:09 PM   #16
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Well I have seen the local gas supplier filling beverage/supply and welding supply co2 from the same line, told me that they only have ONE main tank for co2. They're a large chain supplier (coast to coast) so take it for what it's worth I know personally how pure welding gas has to be did a ton of food grade welding where FDA personal wold take a perfectly good weld and make us cut it open to check for contaminates/and inclusions bites when there done you get to weld it closed.

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Old 10-05-2012, 09:17 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xmacro View Post
- others say that food grade is more pure and that industrial has an argon gas mix
That one I know is incorrect. There are multiple gas mixes used in the welding industry, particularly with regard to CO2, which is likely where the confusion lies.

However, if you ask for CO2, you get CO2. There is no "mix" unless you ask for one, regardless of the application.
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