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Old 10-19-2010, 03:36 PM   #1
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Default Foam problem that will not die

Well, here is the problem, and suggestions would be fantastic:

I have foam, lots of foam. I've kegged for 5 years with no problems, but recently I switched from American to English Ales, and I like the way they taste at 50-55 F. Unfortunately I get loads of foam at this temp.

I already tried replacing my liquid hose line with 9 feet of new 3/16th inch brewery line, and my setup is a uncooled tower on top of a bar fridge (never used to be a problem).

This problem has existed through several kegs (1 was carbonated at 18psi for 10 days, the other was 2 were the shake at 30psi method), and the only way to "fix" it is to bleed off all the Co2 and then serve at 1psi, which obviously is not a real solution.

I've consulted the C02 chart for my temperature and pressure, but the prescriptions don't work for some reason.

I also have a Perlick SS525 on order, maybe that will help.

Of the kegs that are in there now, one is currently carbonating and one is siting there fully carbed (and disconnected from Co2)

As long as the regulator is set at at least 18psi, the carbonation stays in the beer right up to the tap, below about 15psi I can see air pockets form in the line.

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Old 10-19-2010, 11:17 PM   #2
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It sounds like you need longer lines, or you have a leak somewhere.

Between the beer being at 50-55F, the uncooled tower, and the higher pressure needed to carb the beer, I'm thinking you need about 12-15' of line. That's just a guess though, since I haven't done any math.

Longer lines will probably solve your issue though.

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Old 10-20-2010, 02:26 PM   #3
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Thanks, I'll order a longer liquid hose. Does it matter how I store the hose in the fridge, i.e. in a coil vs. not?

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Old 10-20-2010, 06:08 PM   #4
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I am not sure where the thread is, but you may want to search on how to balance your system. Depending on the various types of beers and pressures, you may need to do a whole new system balance. Another thing, when was the last time you disassembled your faucets and cleaned them. I know with my Perlicks, if you dont put them back together just right, the pull is shorter. This would act like a creamer effect, especially at higher pressures. Think in terms of what happens when you put your thumb over the end of a garden hose and turn the water on higher, except with beer.

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Old 10-20-2010, 07:46 PM   #5
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The charts don't work in all cases, and they were way off for me. I think most of them are useless personally. I had two different calcs and they both told me 6 feet, the correct line length for me was 12 feet at 10-12 psi and at around 40 degrees. IMO, 9 feet is a bit short at 50-55, have you tried colder temps with the same conditions? Same results?

Have you tried not overcarbing and using the set it method?

Air coming out of solution in the lines means you overcarbed, and the pressure behing it is not as high....or the temps are fluctuating...or you are not waiting enough time between bleed offs and pours. Gas shouldn't come out of solution in the lines if it's balanced. Wait a few days, bleed off pressure, and pour a glass, then wait a day or so more.

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Old 10-20-2010, 09:29 PM   #6
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You're trying to fix overcarbed kegs of beer. What you need to do is refer to the carb charts, set the pressure and wait (Before you crank and shake or boost the pressure in haste).

9' of serving line should be enough for up to 15psi or so.

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Old 10-20-2010, 10:13 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shroomzofdoom View Post
The charts don't work in all cases, and they were way off for me. I think most of them are useless personally. I had two different calcs and they both told me 6 feet, the correct line length for me was 12 feet at 10-12 psi and at around 40 degrees. IMO, 9 feet is a bit short at 50-55, have you tried colder temps with the same conditions? Same results?

Have you tried not overcarbing and using the set it method?

Air coming out of solution in the lines means you overcarbed, and the pressure behing it is not as high....or the temps are fluctuating...or you are not waiting enough time between bleed offs and pours. Gas shouldn't come out of solution in the lines if it's balanced. Wait a few days, bleed off pressure, and pour a glass, then wait a day or so more.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobby_M View Post
You're trying to fix overcarbed kegs of beer. What you need to do is refer to the carb charts, set the pressure and wait (Before you crank and shake or boost the pressure in haste).

9' of serving line should be enough for up to 15psi or so.

His PSI is fine for what he's doing. And it appears that he has tried the set it and forget it method. 18psi should yield a little under 2.5 volumes at 50-55 degrees. That's perfect in my opinion.
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Old 10-21-2010, 02:56 PM   #8
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Thanks to everyone for the responces, to address them here goes:

I have done the soap test, and I can say with virtual certainty that there is no leak.

I disassemble and clean my standard fuacet after each keg (every 2 weeks). I also run sanitizer through the line. The beer comes out the full bore of the faucet, no restricton from being put back together incorrectly.

The charts don't seem to work in some cases

With a cooler temp (40 degrees) the problem goes away, but I want the higher temp.

I did the "bad keg practice" of shake and throttle pressure for 2 of the kegs, but set and forget for the one that is in there now at 18psi, with exactly the same result.

Other suggestions?

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Old 10-21-2010, 03:09 PM   #9
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testing - I tried quick reply and nothing was posted

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Old 10-21-2010, 03:11 PM   #10
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these things are awesome. and they allow me to serve at upto 30 psi(soda) without any major foaming issues

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/cure...oubles-100151/

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