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Old 05-31-2012, 01:41 AM   #1
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Default Foam and Air

Hey guys! Quick question. I have a beer which I know I overcarbonated one weekend. As a result I've been bleeding off the keg the last few nights by purging the head space. My pours are still coming out foamy. My beer is disconected from the CO2 and still foam. I noticed that after pouring, my line tends to have air or CO2 space develop in it. Could I have an air leak? The keg holds pressure and I have no liquid leaks. I'm stumped! This foam thing is killing me!



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Old 05-31-2012, 01:46 AM   #2
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What is the inside diameter and length of your beer lines?

What you're most likely seeing is CO2 bubbles "breaking out" because there isn't enough resistance in the beer serving path to keep enough pressure on the beer to keep the CO2 in solution.

If the beer is good and truly overcarbed then you should expect that phenomenon to continue until you get that keg tamed to a suitable carbonation level. But, in addition, if you're using short lines or over-sized diameter for their length, even a properly carbed keg may produce excessive foam even at a proper serving temperature...

Cheers!



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Old 05-31-2012, 02:36 AM   #3
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I'm using 8 feet of 3/16 inch tubing at a serving temperature of 35 degrees. This is the exact same setup as my three other kegs which I am having no prolems with. As you said, I guess that I just overcarbed this one. How would you recommend fixing this? Leaving it off of the gas and purging the headspace everynight, pouring, and repeating this process until I no longer am developing gas space inside of the beer line? Thanks in advance!

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Old 05-31-2012, 03:38 AM   #4
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Yes, shut off the gas and start relieving the head space gas pressure every chance you get until the keg is tamed. Could take a few days...

Cheers!

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Old 05-31-2012, 03:42 AM   #5
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Thanks man! Will do!

I hate to see this one go down in foam! It's one of my better beers! The beer I legged following this one I followed the "set it and forget it" method. Worked great! I'll be doing this from now on! No more rush force carbing for me!

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Old 05-31-2012, 05:01 AM   #6
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If you can see the gas breaking out of solution in the lines when it's just sitting, then it's either still overcarbed, or the lines are significantly warmer than the beer in the keg. My guess is that it's still overcarbed, since it takes a lot of venting to degas a keg that's even just a little overcarbed.

FWIW there is a very quick way to degas the keg, but it could remove more carbonation than you want. Put your gas line on a liquid QD, and push gas through the liquid diptube at a couple psi while holding the pressure relief valve open. The turbulence caused by the bubbles will knock a lot of the CO2 out of solution. Doing this for 30 seconds at a time 4-5 times will be enough to degas even a severely overcarbed keg.

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Old 06-01-2012, 04:02 AM   #7
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Thanks man! I know my lines are the same temp as my beer. I can see it breaking out of solution. Thanks for the tip! However, I'm going with the slow method this time. I've just had problems when I rush things! Slow but steady for me! Thanks again! Hoping for improvement very soon!



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