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-   -   First pour (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/first-pour-342462/)

msmith92 07-19-2012 07:02 PM

First pour
 
When I used 5' of beer line I never had this problem. Now at 10' beer line I get the foamy first pour.

Fridge is at 38.

Do I need to turn off c02 and release pressure then turn c02 back on and pour?

Is there a remedy for this?

msmith92 07-19-2012 08:24 PM

Maybe this is the solution:

http://towercooler.com/index.php?opt...d=47&Itemid=54

erikpete18 07-19-2012 09:17 PM

Yeah, it sounds like your lines are warming up. If you've got a tower, figure out someway to either get some cool air up in there (ie fan) or you can just put a heat sink in (long copper rod) to cool the lines off that way. Even if you don't have a tower, a small fan inside can help to circulate the cold air up to where the taps are (like in a collared keezer), keeping your lines cool.

The other option is if your lines are hanging down by the sides of the kegs. If there's a big height change, that can cause the co2 to come out of solution. So if with your new 10' lines they come from the top of the keg, drop to the bottom of the fridge, and then come back up to the tap, that might be why you're having problems (although I'd think it would happen for more than the first pour). Coil the lines up and tie them off with a twisty tie, then lay it flat on top of the keg if you think that might be the problem.

JuanMoore 07-19-2012 10:39 PM

If it's only the first pour that's foamy, then either the lines/faucet/shank are significantly warmer than the temp of the beer in the keg, or the beer is carbed slightly higher than what corresponds to your serving pressure and temp. If you take a look at the lines after they've been sitting undisturbed for a few hours, are there any pockets of gas in them, or is it solid beer all the way?

tmm0f5 07-20-2012 12:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JuanMoore (Post 4264442)
If it's only the first pour that's foamy, then either the lines/faucet/shank are significantly warmer than the temp of the beer in the keg, or the beer is carbed slightly higher than what corresponds to your serving pressure and temp. If you take a look at the lines after they've been sitting undisturbed for a few hours, are there any pockets of gas in them, or is it solid beer all the way?

If you leave the lines undisturbed and there's a pocket of air, what does that imply? Overcarbed or lines/faucet too warm.

I have that problem and always notice some pockets of gas in there. Always have the first pour foam and the second pour is fine.

Thanks,
Tim

erikpete18 07-20-2012 12:32 AM

If you're getting pockets of air, that's definitely because your lines are warmer than the rest of the beer. The beer has a certain amount of co2 in it, but then it warms up while sitting in the line and some of that co2 comes out of solution, causing a bubble. Look into hooking up a small computer fan to move the air around inside, should keep your lines cooler.

JuanMoore 07-20-2012 07:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tmm0f5 (Post 4264614)
If you leave the lines undisturbed and there's a pocket of air, what does that imply? Overcarbed or lines/faucet too warm.

I have that problem and always notice some pockets of gas in there. Always have the first pour foam and the second pour is fine.

Thanks,
Tim

It implies that the temp of the faucet and shank aren't the issue (or at least not the main issue), and that the more likely cause is overcarbonation. Still could be the lines themselves getting warmer than the keg, but that's less likely unless they're running through a tower or coffin. How are you carbing the beer?

Quote:

Originally Posted by erikpete18 (Post 4264673)
If you're getting pockets of air, that's definitely because your lines are warmer than the rest of the beer. The beer has a certain amount of co2 in it, but then it warms up while sitting in the line and some of that co2 comes out of solution, causing a bubble. Look into hooking up a small computer fan to move the air around inside, should keep your lines cooler.

Beer carbed higher than the corresponding serving pressure shows the exact same symptoms.

msmith92 07-20-2012 02:02 PM

No. I don't have any air pockets.

JuanMoore 07-20-2012 02:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by msmith92
No. I don't have any air pockets.

Most likely cause then is your faucet and shank are warming up too much. Where are they mounted, fridge door, tower, coffin box, keezer collar?

carlisle_bob 07-20-2012 02:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JuanMoore (Post 4265704)
Most likely cause then is your faucet and shank are warming up too much. Where are they mounted, fridge door, tower, coffin box, keezer collar?

Hi

I'd also include beer lines on that list. Even more so if there's no fan in the fridge.

Bob


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