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Old 09-25-2012, 02:20 PM   #1
noreaster40s
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Default Fermentation In Keg

I just went to keg a 10 gallon batch into 2 kegs and noticed by the hydrometer reading that it looks like it should ferment more. It'd been fermenting in the primary for a week and longer than that in the secondary and the beer is actually pretty clear. But I want it to ferment a bit longer even though I did put it in the kegs. When letting it ferment in the kegs do you keep the pressure release valve open or just seal it up? Thanks.

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Old 09-25-2012, 02:29 PM   #2
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I think it is only a problem if the pressure builds too great, I've heard 30psi is too much for the yeast. However I have kegged beer that still had a ways to go, I wouldn't call it a "secondary" more like "almost done, but let it sit a while more". I just closed it up because I had no concern about it generating enough CO2 to make the pressure go up. I just figured any CO2 would just start the carbing process earlier.

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Old 09-26-2012, 01:59 PM   #3
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I had the same issue in 3 kegs 2 weeks ago.

One was an Imperial Stout 2 years old. It quit at 1.030 or so. I set it out at basement temp and popped the relief to de-carbonate it. Then pitched a .5 liter US-05 starter. Finished at 1.020

The other 2 kegs were the same deal as you. Fermented 10 gallons in a Sanke, and transferred to cornies before checking the gravity.
I did the same thing - Popped the relief, pitched US-05 starter, and let them set for another week and a half.
One finished at 1.020 and the other at 1.018
Not too bad.

As long as you have fermentation happening, you'll have positive pressure inside the keg, and no o2 should enter through the relief valve.

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Originally Posted by Ecnerwal View Post
What does the primary pressure gauge on the tank tell us? That's right, the temperature. Put it on a scale if you want to know how much is in it...
Put some duct tape over the gauge - Or better yet - Replace the high pressure gauge with a plug - High pressure gauges are useless!
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Old 09-27-2012, 02:14 AM   #4
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I was just sitting here thinking about this and it just struck me that I didn't put CO2 to the keg at all to disperse any oxygen that would be in there after I transferred the beer. Is that something I should do? It wasn't a very active fermentation at all when I kegged it so I don't know that the oxygen will get displaced from that. Also, should I pitch a starter in them? Thanks for the feedback.

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