The Great Bottle Opener Giveaway

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > Fellow homebrewers, meet my new beer engine . . .

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 06-23-2006, 05:20 AM   #11
sonvolt
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 902
Liked 8 Times on 6 Posts

Default

The pump is the only thing that I am using to serve the beer. I am a little worried about how the beer will age after tonight. Me and two buddies drank about half of it. So, I am going to throw a little bit of CO2 into the keg and purge it of oxygen. No matter what, though, the beer will be different when I drink it next. It will be interesting to see how the oxidation affects the product - but this is what real ale is all about.

Too buzzed tonight to describe how I built it or get any pics of the inside, etc. So I will update tomorrow. Basically, I just coiled up a bunch of beer line inside the cooler and used some brass fittings/barbs/couplers on each side of the cooler wall to get the beer from the keg and through the pump. I filled the cooler with ice, but there is only 10 feet of line inside the cooler - just enough to get the temp of the ale down to about 45 degrees. I am going to make a sparkler for the tip of the faucet itself, but after seeing the head that I get just from the hand pump itself, I am not sure I need it.

I am very pleased with its performance tonight, and my buddies got a huge kick out of it.

__________________
sonvolt is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-23-2006, 07:09 AM   #12
wild
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Surprise, AZ.
Posts: 1,496
Liked 3 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sonvolt
I am a little worried about how the beer will age after tonight. Me and two buddies drank about half of it. So, I am going to throw a little bit of CO2 into the keg and purge it of oxygen.
I've thought of hooking up keg filled with CO2 unpressurized to the inlet of the beer keg. This way the CO2 can be drawn out of the keg only as beer is pumped.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sonvolt
Basically, I just coiled up a bunch of beer line inside the cooler and used some brass fittings/barbs/couplers on each side of the cooler wall to get the beer from the keg and through the pump. I filled the cooler with ice, but there is only 10 feet of line inside the cooler - just enough to get the temp of the ale down to about 45 degrees.
Great job. I never thought of putting mine on an ice chest. I just made a box with left-over wood and coiled 10' of 1/4" copper line inside it. I still haven't needed a sparkler. I do like that idea.

Wild
__________________
On Tap -
  1. 3 year old Oak Aged Bourbon Porter
  2. Irish Red Rye
  3. Robust Porter
  4. Russian Imperial Stout
  5. Mirror Pond Clone dry hopped with Citra
  6. Mirror Pond Clone dry hopped with Centennial
Primary - Nada
Secondary -
From man's sweat and God's love, beer came into the world. -- Saint Arnoldus
wild is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-23-2006, 09:26 PM   #13
Brewsmith
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Brewsmith's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 6,259
Liked 23 Times on 22 Posts

Default

I'm thinking for a future build here... My kegerator will be finished in a week or so when all of the rest of the parts come in (I'm waiting on the taps and shanks), but does it sound reasonable to instead of building one out of an ice chest, to use the existing fridge and freezer? My keger has one large single door with the freezer inside and on top. Couldn't I keep the keg outside of the fridge, run the beer line in to the freezer to a coil and mount the tap/engine to the door or side of the fridge? Then I could have four kegs inside cold, and a real ale on tap as well. Sound plausable to anyone else? I already have the 5 kegs...

__________________
Fermenting:#160 Apollo/Calypso Pale Ale
Kegged:#153 Old Helicon Barleywine 2013, #157 Irish Red, #158 Mosaic IPA, #159 Bravo/Delta ESB
Up Next:Brown Porter, American Stout, Imperial Stout
My Recipes
Tuba Sonata

Smith & Co. Custom Tap Handles
Brewsmith is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-23-2006, 11:21 PM   #14
NEPABREWER
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
NEPABREWER's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Scranton PA
Posts: 188
Default

real ale? please digress or post a link please - I am all about learning tradition, ht eway it used to be - the way it ought to be and then sh*tting all over it. rock on
I've heard of cask conditioned hand pump etc is that what this is? a beer line chiller with a hand pump?

__________________

Primary #1 too
Primary #2 busy
Secondary #1 with
Secondary#2 school
Secondary#3 to brew
Bottled and fine: Belgian spiced wheat
Bass Ale in the keg

NEPABREWER is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-24-2006, 01:03 AM   #15
david_42
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
david_42's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Willamina & Oak Grove, Oregon, USA
Posts: 25,648
Liked 131 Times on 124 Posts

Default

I like it. I've got a little cooler that is too small for much else, but would probably work.

__________________

Remember one unassailable statistic, as explained by the late, great George Carlin: "Just think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of them are even stupider!"

"I would like to die on Mars, just not on impact." Elon Musk

david_42 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-24-2006, 02:57 AM   #16
sonvolt
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 902
Liked 8 Times on 6 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brewsmith
I'm thinking for a future build here... My kegerator will be finished in a week or so when all of the rest of the parts come in (I'm waiting on the taps and shanks), but does it sound reasonable to instead of building one out of an ice chest, to use the existing fridge and freezer? My keger has one large single door with the freezer inside and on top. Couldn't I keep the keg outside of the fridge, run the beer line in to the freezer to a coil and mount the tap/engine to the door or side of the fridge? Then I could have four kegs inside cold, and a real ale on tap as well. Sound plausable to anyone else? I already have the 5 kegs...
This would work . . . so long as you had a place to mount the pump, since it needs a flat surface. You would have to put it on top of the fridge, right? As for the keg of real ale sitting alongside the fridge, be careful in terms of the environment it is in. If you gear is in your garage, say, your real ale would experience some pretty dramatic shifts in temperature, etc. While a truly hard-core real ale enthusiast might say that the changes due to this are all a part of the real ale experience, I think that your keg will last longer than the traditional cask from which real ale is served in England. You would probably have some pretty nasty beer after a while.

If you kegerator is sitting in a consistently cool place; however, you should be ok.
__________________
sonvolt is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-24-2006, 03:02 AM   #17
sonvolt
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 902
Liked 8 Times on 6 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NEPABREWER
real ale? please digress or post a link please - I am all about learning tradition, ht eway it used to be - the way it ought to be and then sh*tting all over it. rock on
I've heard of cask conditioned hand pump etc is that what this is? a beer line chiller with a hand pump?

For information about real ale, visit the website of an organization called CAMRA. They are a consumer advocate group in England who are concerned with the survival of real ale (cask conditioned ale). Basically, real ale is any ale that is still "alive." When your ale naturally conditioned and unfiltered, it is technically "real ale." Most homebrewers who bottle are making "real ale," but the term is mostly reserved for cask conditioned ale which is served from a firken (cask) with a traditional beer engine (hand pump) without the aid of CO2. The casks are allowed to vent air, so the beer oxidizes over the course of the few days it is on tap. True real ale lovers enjoy the oxidation and can tell with just a taste how many days the ale has been open.

Cask conditioned ale is traditionally served around 50-55 degrees (I think), but most Americans prefer it a bit cooler. If you find a brewpub offering a true cask conditioned ale, try it. When pumped from a beer engine, the head is thick and creamy and smooth - the beer is rich and creamy with very little CO2. IMO, it is a truly magical experience.
__________________
sonvolt is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-24-2006, 04:41 AM   #18
NEPABREWER
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
NEPABREWER's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Scranton PA
Posts: 188
Default

Their is a local rest that occasionally offers cask conditioned ale "on the hand pump", but I find it hard to beleive that they would be strict purists. The beer on tap was Victory Brewing Co "Hop Devil" and it was quite fine, but I think it must be in a cooler or something, because around here if beer is not <40 deg its B A D

__________________

Primary #1 too
Primary #2 busy
Secondary #1 with
Secondary#2 school
Secondary#3 to brew
Bottled and fine: Belgian spiced wheat
Bass Ale in the keg

NEPABREWER is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-24-2006, 01:46 PM   #19
sonvolt
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 902
Liked 8 Times on 6 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NEPABREWER
Their is a local rest that occasionally offers cask conditioned ale "on the hand pump", but I find it hard to beleive that they would be strict purists. The beer on tap was Victory Brewing Co "Hop Devil" and it was quite fine, but I think it must be in a cooler or something, because around here if beer is not <40 deg its B A D
Yeah, most of the places I have been serve it very cold, because Americans want beverages cold. This is unfortunate, because the extreme coldness often confuses the palate to the degree that the complexities of flavor are often lost. The brewpub near me (Rhodell's in Peoria) serves it warmer than the other brews, but still colder than he would if serving in Scotland (where the brewer is from). The added benefit of this colder serving temp is that the beer is preserved longer than if kept at room or cellar temps.
__________________
sonvolt is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-25-2006, 08:08 AM   #20
Brewsmith
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Brewsmith's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Torrance, CA
Posts: 6,259
Liked 23 Times on 22 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sonvolt
This would work . . . so long as you had a place to mount the pump, since it needs a flat surface. You would have to put it on top of the fridge, right? As for the keg of real ale sitting alongside the fridge, be careful in terms of the environment it is in. If you gear is in your garage, say, your real ale would experience some pretty dramatic shifts in temperature, etc. While a truly hard-core real ale enthusiast might say that the changes due to this are all a part of the real ale experience, I think that your keg will last longer than the traditional cask from which real ale is served in England. You would probably have some pretty nasty beer after a while.

If you kegerator is sitting in a consistently cool place; however, you should be ok.
I was thinking of mounting a bracket to the side of the fridge so the beer engine could be mounted on a surface. And the temp in the garage isn't really that bad. I'm just ouside of Los Angeles and get the ocean breeze constantly (nobody search for the thread where I said I hate LA please ). I need to insulate and better temp regulate the brewery anyways, but for right now it works ok. Right now I'm just thinking hypothetically. I need to get the kegerator up and running before I attempt anything else. Plus, if I find that the keg doesn't last I can 1. make a smaller batch. 2. Get a smaller keg. or 3. I can just drink more .
__________________
Fermenting:#160 Apollo/Calypso Pale Ale
Kegged:#153 Old Helicon Barleywine 2013, #157 Irish Red, #158 Mosaic IPA, #159 Bravo/Delta ESB
Up Next:Brown Porter, American Stout, Imperial Stout
My Recipes
Tuba Sonata

Smith & Co. Custom Tap Handles
Brewsmith is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Fellow homebrewers, need donations for multiple sclerosis bike ride DSrugis General Chit Chat 0 03-17-2009 01:56 AM
Enclosure for a beer engine? kentmich Bottling/Kegging 0 11-03-2008 12:24 PM
Look for DIY Beer Engine & Jockey Box Schlenkerla General Beer Discussion 3 10-31-2008 06:12 PM
Hello fellow homebrewers - Baraboo, WI! Baraboo Brew Introductions 6 06-09-2008 02:32 AM
beer engine help! Zymurgrafi DIY Projects 3 08-04-2007 08:27 PM