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Old 02-13-2010, 12:41 AM   #1
Lord_Lycoperdon
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Default Does pressure stop fermentation?

I was talking to guy who sells kombucha here in Oakland about how he bottles it. He just uses glass bottles with plastic lids. and that the pressure stops the fermentation and that you don't have to worry about it with kombucha.

Is this guy right? Is the same true about beer? Has anyone ever even had a bottle explode? (I never have...)

I searched the internet for answers and I found this article (below) but it is kinda confusing and I'm not sure how much pressure is in a bottle of beer~

Titre du document / Document title
How does yeast respond to pressure?
Auteur(s) / Author(s)
FERNANDES P. M. B. ;
Résumé / Abstract
The brewing and baking yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used as a model for stress response studies of eukaryotic cells. In this review we focus on the effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on S. cerevisiae. HHP exerts a broad effect on yeast cells characteristic of common stresses, mainly associated with protein alteration and lipid bilayer phase transition. Like most stresses, pressure induces cell cycle arrest. Below 50 MPa (500 atm) yeast cell morphology is unaffected whereas above 220 MPa wild-type cells are killed. S. cerevisiae cells can acquire barotolerance if they are pretreated with a sublethal stress due to temperature, ethanol, hydrogen peroxide, or pressure. Nevertheless, pressure only leads to protection against severe stress if, after pressure pretreatment, the cells are also re-incubated at room pressure. We attribute this effect to the inhibition of the protein synthesis apparatus under HHP. The global genome expression analysis of S. cerevisiae cells submitted to HHP revealed a stress response profile. The majority of the up-regulated genes are involved in stress defense and carbohydrate metabolism while most repressed genes belong to the cell cycle progression and protein synthesis categories. However, the signaling pathway involved in the pressure response is still to be elucidated. Nitric oxide, a signaling molecule involved in the regulation of a large number of cellular functions, confers baroprotection. Furthermore, S. cerevisiae cells in the early exponential phase submitted to 50-MPa pressure show induction of the expression level of the nitric oxide synthase inducible isoform. As pressure becomes an important biotechnological tool, studies concerning this kind of stress in microorganisms are imperative.
Revue / Journal Title
Brazilian journal of medical and biological research ISSN 0100-879X CODEN BJMRDK
Source / Source
2005, vol. 38, no8, pp. 1239-1245 [7 page(s) (article)]
Langue / Language
Anglais
Editeur / Publisher
Associação Brasileira de Divulgação Científica, Ribeirão Preto, BRESIL (1981) (Revue)
Localisation / Location
INIST-CNRS, Cote INIST : 14110, 35400013239836.0120

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Old 02-13-2010, 01:01 AM   #2
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At those pressures cited in that write up the bottle would not stand a chance and the beer would be grossly overcarbed. 50Mpa (500atm) is 7200psi. Its not the pressure that stops yeast its the lack of fermentables . If there is to much fermentables the beer will end up overcarbed and if the pressure gets to high or the bottle is weak.

Of all the beer that I have bottled over the years I have had one bottle bomb.

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Old 02-13-2010, 01:05 AM   #3
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Not sure about kombucha or what the actual pressures are, but since there are people who do closed pressurized fermentations, I'd say that pressure does not stop fermentation. Plenty of people have accidentally added too much priming sugar, or bottled beer prematurely, and had exploding bottles.

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Old 02-13-2010, 04:45 AM   #4
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My wife makes kombucha. It's bottled after most of the fermentation is complete and not much pressure develops after that. Just enough to make a little fizz.

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Old 02-16-2010, 02:59 PM   #5
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Thanks.

After thinking about it for a little bit I realized that he also refrigerates the drink when done and sure that slows down or stops the fermentation, but it's still kinda crazy that someone who sells a fermented drink told me that pressure stops the fermentation.......

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Old 02-16-2010, 06:19 PM   #6
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It will kill the yeast, AFAIK. I have heard from yeast manufacturers that PIS of 2-3 is enough to stress them and cause off-flavors, so I can only imagine at pressures higher than that would kill them. Try sending an e-mail to White Labs, they'll tell you for sure.

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Old 02-16-2010, 06:30 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jipper View Post
I have heard from yeast manufacturers that PIS of 2-3 is enough to stress them and cause off-flavors
Not sure what PIS is, but.... During storage, yeast will maintain improved viability if stored under low pressure (< 5 PSI).

However, pressure during fermentation does not cause off flavors. In fact, it reduces esters and the formation of certain undesirable compounds. For example, some breweries routinely apply 15+ PSI of top pressure to fermentation tanks during active fermentation. That is on top of the 6 - 10 PSI of hydrostatic pressure already present due to the sheer height of the unitanks.

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Try sending an e-mail to White Labs, they'll tell you for sure.
Yes, do that.
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Old 02-16-2010, 06:32 PM   #8
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Yeah PIS ... you know, Pressure In Suds. Yeah thats it.

Well now I'm curious ... Thanks for the challenge to that, I hope I was wrong.

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Old 02-16-2010, 06:40 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jipper View Post
Well now I'm curious ... Thanks for the challenge to that, I hope I was wrong.
FWIW, I compiled a short summary for what the brewing literature says about fermentation top pressure.
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Old 02-16-2010, 06:40 PM   #10
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Lord of Wolf Farts? Ha.

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