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-   -   Do you turn off your Co2? (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/do-you-turn-off-your-co2-28243/)

jeffg 04-24-2007 07:17 PM

Do you turn off your Co2?
 
So once you have kegged a beer and gotten it stabilized to a proper carbonation level (via patience or shake and roll), do you shut off your Co2 valve after the last pour or do you leave it on all the time?

Just curious what others do. I recently went from a tried and true 1 keg system to two and after two weeks discovered my tank is empty and one of the nearly empty kegs did noteven have enough pressure to pour out the last beer. the more full keg is fortunately still pressurized. At this point the leak could be anywhere, but maybe I should start turning off the Co2 valve between beers to avoid this situation?

poguemahone 04-24-2007 07:23 PM

I'm interested in input on this as well.

I've been turning my CO2 off once my keg is carbed up. They maintain enough pressure for a week or so (1-2 pints a day) before i put in 12 psi for a few hours. I suppose it is up to how much usage they are getting..??

olllllo 04-24-2007 07:24 PM

The only reason to do this, IMO, is to be absolutely sure that you have no CO2 leaks.

I did so for quite awhile (months), but I have reached a point where it is on all the time now.

BierMuncher 04-24-2007 07:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jeffg
So once you have kegged a beer and gotten it stabilized to a proper carbonation level (via patience or shake and roll), do you shut off your Co2 valve after the last pour or do you leave it on all the time?

Just curious what others do. I recently went from a tried and true 1 keg system to two and after two weeks discovered my tank is empty and one of the nearly empty kegs did noteven have enough pressure to pour out the last beer. the more full keg is fortunately still pressurized. At this point the leak could be anywhere, but maybe I should start turning off the Co2 valve between beers to avoid this situation?

Your questions has two answers:

For a system that works well with no leaks, no need to shut off valvees or regulators. The gas will stabilize at the 12 (or so) PSI. If you shut off the CO2 and let the residual pressure push your beer out, the CO2 will deplete as you loose pressure and then CO2 will come out of the beer into the head space to equilibriate (word?)...making your beer go flat.

For a leaky system: shutting off your valves to prevent gas escape is a short term fix but again, you'd face the same issues with letting gas discharge and beer go flat.

I'd say rethread everything with teflon tape and get some soapy water around those joints and the keg valves to identify (via bubbles) the leaky areas.

krispy d 04-24-2007 07:28 PM

I usually turn off my gas at night for a couple of reasons.

1) I am afraid of surprise leaks. I have had a tank mysteriously drain itself and don't want to deal with that again.

2) I am afraid of equalization/over carbonation. In all honesty I don't even remeber if this is a valid fear but in the bar I used to work at we shut of the gas every night so that beer wouldn't over carbonate. I've done it at home that way for years and am a creature of habit.

Cheesefood 04-24-2007 07:54 PM

I don't think I've shut my tank off since I turned it on, and that was a while ago.

EdWort 04-24-2007 08:03 PM

I have two 5# tanks, both with a stainless cross that feeds 3 cornies (one is in the kegerator and the other in the chest freezer). I leave both on 24/7.

My 20# I do turn off when not in use though. It's my jack of all trades for moving beer, purging kegs & carboys, etc.

Drunkensatyr 04-24-2007 08:06 PM

The only time my tank gets shut off is when I'm brewing (I use Co2 to move all my wort around)

sirsloop 04-24-2007 08:14 PM

You should have taken the time to check for leaking CO2 when you built the keg system. If you didn't, now would be a good time to test all of the fittings w/ some soapy water or by submerging it.

Its kinda like building a race car and not checking for fluid leaks after you get it put together. :)

johnsma22 04-24-2007 08:29 PM

Your system was fine when you were only serving one keg, correct? Now that you have added another keg it leaks, correct? Well, simply go back over the fittings and keg that you have added to find your leak. Soapy water works OK, but if you go to a plumbing supply house you can get some gas leak detector solution that you can apply with an applicator instead of spraying on. It WILL locate your leak.

A great way to leak check a keg is to pressurize it to say 30 psi and submerge it in a bathtub full of water. The bubbles never lie.


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