Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > Counterpressure bottling foaming issues

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 11-24-2009, 11:36 AM   #1
chode720
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Cleveland
Posts: 528
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default Counterpressure bottling foaming issues

I am planning on taking some homebrew back home for Thanksgiving and tried to fill them, following the http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/we-no-need-no-stinking-beer-gun-24678/ instructions.

However, when i filled the bottles, I got a ton of foam and had a hard time even getting the beer to fill into the neck.

I chilled the bottles and lines down in the freezer to get them nice and cold, turned the regulator to 5 PSI, and vented the keg. However, still lots and lots of foam. I can only think of a few things it may be:

A. Do i need to turn the regulator down to 2 or 3 PSI to reduce the flow even more?
B. I dont think I completely vented the keg. I pulled the pressure release valve for a few seconds and got most, but not all, of the co2 out.
C. There was some starsan foam in the bottles from when I sanitized them. Could the beer have reacted with the foam and caused the co2 to come out of solution?


I am going to try again tonight and see if I have better luck, but any input/advice would be appreciated!

__________________

Primary1: Pumpkin Ale
Primary2: Christmas Ale
Pimary3: Apfelwein
Secondary: Sour Brown
Drinking: Warrior Pale Ale, Wit, American Rye
chode720 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-24-2009, 01:09 PM   #3
HairyDogBrewing
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Mechanicsburg, PA
Posts: 580
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

I've noticed that it helps to run a little bit through the racking cane into a mug.
Just until it runs clear.
If it doesn't run clear the pressure may be too low.
I have 10 ft of 3/16 vinyl icemaker tubing and use 6 to 8 psi.

Also, sometimes the first bottle or two will foam alot, but then it will settle down.

__________________
HairyDogBrewing is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-24-2009, 02:37 PM   #4
sea2summit3
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Reno, NV
Posts: 164
Default

How long is your line? You may need to use a loner one. I push with 3 psi, so try turning your pressure down as well. Also, fill slowly. The first time I did it, I was getting tons of foam. I learned that you really need to fill slowly so there is always some counter-pressure within the bottle.

__________________
"A bar is better than a newspaper for public discussion."
-Jim Parker


Primary:-
Secondary:IPA, just "IPA"
Bottled: Applewood Smoked Porter, Windy Bridge Stout, Maple Chocolate Pumpkin Ale, Maple Pumpkin Ale, California Steam, Black Cat Porter, Irish Coffee Stout
Kegged: Blackberry Stout, Nut Brown, Sweet Cider, Apfelwein #2, IPA, SNCA Clone
sea2summit3 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-24-2009, 02:40 PM   #5
Homercidal
Moderator
HBT_MODERATOR.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Homercidal's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Reed City, MI
Posts: 23,228
Liked 2019 Times on 1451 Posts
Likes Given: 1106

Default

I vent mine and then turn the pressure up until it just starts filling.

Also, in case you didn't realize it, the point is to seal the bottle with the stopper. The beer might foam a bit until the pressure in the bottle equalizes with the co2 saturation point. usually in about .5 inches or so. I generally don't get much foaming, even with highly carbed beers. Sometimes I get practically ZERO foam.

Keep the stopper sealed until the beer stops flowing, then crack it open with your finger. You can adjust the flow rate by how much you crack open the seal.

I've filled bottles without having to even create a seal sometimes. You just never know.

__________________
Livin' after midnight. Rockin' til the dawn. Lovin' til the morning. Then I'm gone. I'm gone.
Homercidal is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-25-2009, 12:27 AM   #6
RogerMcAllen
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Decatur, IL
Posts: 619
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts

Default

I'll second Homercidal and guess that you probably not aren't making a good seal with your stopper. If you can't completely stop the flow of beer something is wrong. I don't do any of the silly extras (cold bottles, cold lines, turning down the pressure) and have no problem as long as I have a good seal.

Last time I made the mistake of storing the solid plastic tube in my stopper, and it stretched the stopper ever so slightly. I couldn't make a good seal, and had foam everywhere.

__________________
RogerMcAllen is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-25-2009, 02:13 AM   #7
Bobby_M
Vendor and Brewer
HBT_SPONSOR.png
Vendor Ads 
Feedback Score: 2 reviews
 
Bobby_M's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Whitehouse Station, NJ
Posts: 21,893
Liked 935 Times on 622 Posts
Likes Given: 28

Default

I agree with the bit about purging the air out of the tubing and racking cane into a glass... drink this later.

If you start the fill with a layer of foam, it only gets worse. Leave the stopper firmly seated until the flow stops, then pinch the edge with your fingernail to vent slowly. One other tip I have is to reduce the temp on your fridge controller to 33F the night before you plan on filling. Cold cold beer likes to hold CO2.

__________________
BrewHardware.com
Sightglass, Refractometer, Ball Valve, Weldless bulkhead, Thermometer, Decals, Stainless Steel Fittings, Compression Fittings, Camlock Quick Disconnects, Scale, RIMS tube, Plate Chiller, Chugger Pump, Super Clear Silicone Tubing, and more!

New Stuff?
Bobby_M is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-25-2009, 11:29 AM   #8
chode720
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Cleveland
Posts: 528
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

I tried this again last night and it worked much better! I turned the PSI down to about 2 and vented teh keg completely first. I previously did have a very good seal with the stopper, but i think my issues there was that i was venting the gas too fast once the flow stopped. It was causing big bursts of beer, not just a slow flow.

I had about a half inch of foam on top as I was filling it, but it didnt cause any issues with filling the bottle all the way. I'll crack one tonight to see if the carbonation is okay and if so, start filling a ton for Thanksgiving!

__________________

Primary1: Pumpkin Ale
Primary2: Christmas Ale
Pimary3: Apfelwein
Secondary: Sour Brown
Drinking: Warrior Pale Ale, Wit, American Rye
chode720 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
over-carbonated beer? keg/foaming issues. Gritsak Bottling/Kegging 11 07-21-2014 07:20 PM
Scale & bottling issues - Please help!!!! EamusCatuli Bottling/Kegging 2 07-07-2009 12:31 AM
Foaming Issues DanBirdman Soda Making 9 06-14-2009 11:45 PM
Picnic tap foaming issues Gonefishing Bottling/Kegging 8 11-17-2008 09:39 AM
Foaming while bottling Brewno General Beer Discussion 11 08-19-2006 12:56 AM