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Old 05-16-2012, 06:33 PM   #11
deadboy
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Yep, don't make the mistake I did. That bridge rectifier is SUPER important. That motor spins very fast and even with the right amperage/voltage AC power will burn that motor out in about 2 minutes. It really is very easy to install. If you have any questions be sure to ask me (or the teacher ) milesvdustin!

Dangit, I wish I'd know that had a name as was a thing I could just buy. soldering the 4 diodes to a board in sequence that would fit in the box I built was kind of a pain in the posterior. Seeing how compact they can be makes me wish I'd just gotten one of them instead of 4 individual diodes.

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Old 05-16-2012, 06:43 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deadboy View Post
I use a bilge fan to blow the air from the bottom up into my coffin box (it's a keezer rather than a kegerator). The advantage to this type of fan is that it's designed to run in a damper environment than a PC fan. Also it's a lot more powerful and therefore better able to push the air.
I use an Atwood 4" Quiet blower. The only challenge was that it requires a 12 volt 3 amp DC Power source. If you've got a rudimentary knowledge of electronics all you need to do is wire it up to a stepdown transformer from Radioshack (110v to 12v 3A) then added 4 diodes to convert it to DC power. It runs like a champ and keeps my coffin box cold.
That looks like a good idea. When my CPU fan breaks(and it will) I think I will replace it with one of these.

Now I just need to figure out that 4 diode thingy. Can I buy something already built?
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Old 05-16-2012, 06:54 PM   #13
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Yep, absolutely. You could would use a 10A bridge rectifier and a step down transformer to turn 120v AC from the outlet into 12v 3A for the fan.. The rectifier will have 4 pins. One +, one -, and two ~. You solder the two ~ into the yellow wires from the transformer and the + and - to the appropriate leads on the fan and presto.

I should probably add that the "quiet" description is a relative term. It is a bilge fan for a boat with a motor. you'll hear it blowing inside your keezer/kegerator. It's not loud but you'll hear it. When you open said beer receptacle you will DEFINITELY hear it. It moves a LOT of air.

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Old 05-16-2012, 07:31 PM   #14
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Having a lot of air is a good thing. I was planning on running a supply to the tower from the same fan, so that works even better!

When you say it makes noise, how much noise are we talking? Is my wife going to make me "undo" the work after I do it? ;-)

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Old 05-16-2012, 08:30 PM   #15
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Where is your kegerator/keezer? Mine is in my garage/man cave so even when it's open it's quieter than anything I'd be doing in there.

It's inside a box that is insulated to stay cold so it generally will be pretty good at keeping the noise in. I'd say when my Keezer is shut, which it should be 99.8% of the time, it's not much louder than a box fan on low.

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Old 05-16-2012, 08:43 PM   #16
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my fridge has a couple of 12V connectors, one tied to the compressor and another circuit on the light switch. I hooked up a 3" computer fan to blow across the plate when the compressor is on and a 1" fan to blow up into the tower (using flexible fiber conduit).

No external noise from the fans. But it really depends on the fan, i've seen some that sound like jet engines (usually server fans).

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Old 05-16-2012, 08:50 PM   #17
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Computer fans GENERALLY run on 300-500mA. The atwood bilge fan I'm using wants between 2.5 and 3.2 A (nearly 10x the amperage). It's considerably louder but it's moving a LOT more air.

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Old 05-17-2012, 03:54 AM   #18
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My kegerator is in the kitchen, virtually right next to the dinner table :P

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Old 05-17-2012, 02:52 PM   #19
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I listened to it again. Mine doesn't currently have any sort of enclosure around it to muffle the sound and it's not any louder than a box fan on low. Unless you or your wife are PARTICULARLY sensitive to sound it's just a soft white noise.


When you open it up that's when it gets loud.

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Old 05-17-2012, 05:25 PM   #20
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I had noticed my lines (at the top I my keezer) were a lot warmer than the kegs, so I added a fan to my keezer to circulate the cool air and break the stratification. My kegs are on a stand in my keezer so all the cool air just sat below Ye kegs and wasn't cooling them nearly as well as I wanted. The holes in the PVC sit below the stand and the fan pulls the cool air up to the top. I've had this guy running 100% of the time for over a year and it's worked great (looks like crap, but cost me nothing).

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