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Old 11-04-2010, 12:58 AM   #21
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This thread has been a good read. I'm about to start my keezer built, and I'd really like to do one with a coffin.

My first thought was aquarium fans too. I probably have an extra or two laying around, I'll have to give it a try and report back. May be a few weeks though.



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Old 11-04-2010, 10:13 AM   #22
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I completed my kegerator with a coffin box a few weeks ago. I chose the 'simpler' method to start which was to encase the beer lines in copper right from the shanks and then down into the fridge about 10".
I think the 10" extension into the compartment is where your design might be substantially different to what I've tried...I just didn't have that kind of real estate, and also copper for six taps would have been rather pricey. One of the best PC fans I could find was about $15. The copper and insulation for my two tap proof of concept was around $20. Ultimately, this would have been around 3x the price of the fan setup for me.

I also found that the fan did a much better job of cooling for me. I used remote probe thermos to check the temp at the floor, collar/lid, top of coffin, and also at the shank. My shanks now are about 6 degrees off of floor temp, with the copper this as around 14 degrees. This improved my foam situation greatly, but it did not solve it---the first third of my first beer was always foam.

If the end result is NO foam, then you are all set! But please do share your design a bit more: photos, temps, collar/no collar, size of coffin, etc. Also, why would you go the copper route versus the fan?

As I mentioned earlier, I have every intent of modifying the original post as examples come up. But to do so I'll need some pics and details. Keep us posted and thanks for the input.




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Originally Posted by JByer323 View Post
This thread has been a good read. I'm about to start my keezer built, and I'd really like to do one with a coffin.

My first thought was aquarium fans too. I probably have an extra or two laying around, I'll have to give it a try and report back. May be a few weeks though.

Thanks and please be sure to post photos and log your temps. The goal is to make this thread about the successful attempts and document the designs that work. I though of Aquar. pumps as well and they could fit the bill. If you have one laying around by all means go for it and post up your results.


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Old 11-09-2010, 12:16 PM   #23
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I truly know how much effect a tower/coffing cooler can have. I installed a simple blower system in my Summit kegerator and it made a world of a difference. Runs full time and I used quick disconnects for the power so if the fan dies I can replace it easily and quickly.

BUT
In your design I have 2 questions.
1) The air movement in your diagram flows vertically up into the coffin, then has to make a 90 degree turn, flow across the shanks, make another 90 turn downwards and then flow back into the main keezer compartment. Forgive me, but this sounds kind of JFK'ish Kevin Costnerish in terms of efficency. Forgive me for mentioning his Waterworld name, lol. I shall not do it again. How much air do you feel coming out of the coffin area after it's made its journey?

2) How did you mount the fans horizontally to blow into/out of the coffin?

Your keezer is just awesome BTW. I just set up my buddies keezer using a tower and I showed him your keezer and his jaw dropped at what he COULD have had versus what he got.

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Old 11-09-2010, 01:23 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by skibumdc View Post
I truly know how much effect a tower/coffing cooler can have. I installed a simple blower system in my Summit kegerator and it made a world of a difference. Runs full time and I used quick disconnects for the power so if the fan dies I can replace it easily and quickly.

BUT
In your design I have 2 questions.
1) The air movement in your diagram flows vertically up into the coffin, then has to make a 90 degree turn, flow across the shanks, make another 90 turn downwards and then flow back into the main keezer compartment. Forgive me, but this sounds kind of JFK'ish Kevin Costnerish in terms of efficency. Forgive me for mentioning his Waterworld name, lol. I shall not do it again. How much air do you feel coming out of the coffin area after it's made its journey?

2) How did you mount the fans horizontally to blow into/out of the coffin?

Your keezer is just awesome BTW. I just set up my buddies keezer using a tower and I showed him your keezer and his jaw dropped at what he COULD have had versus what he got.
Thanks for the kind words on the design. It had to fit into our overall design for the basement/bar area and look like furniture. Clearly A LOT more work, but it had to meet my fiance's seal of approval to get funding.
AS you can see, the base freezer that I used was downright fugly. I beleive someone referred to my work as 'polishing a turd'...lol


If you look at the coffin itself, you can see that the fan simply fits into a small cutout in the insulation. It's an interference fit, no screws or sealant are used to hold it in. My coffin is 'rear entry' so I can remove the back panel to service the lines or replace the fan for any reason.


Regarding the overall design, mine is HORRIBLY inefficient. I guess that's sort of the point of my OP. If you look at the some of the others' designs I linked to, they are much more efficient. Ultimately...even an inefficient design will work. The keys are good air movement and unrestricted airflow. The air moves in one side and out the other and it's very brisk. I guesstimate that it's around 60CFM at the voltage it's running. There's no chance for air to pool or stagnate in the coffin as the entire air volume is probably changed 50 or more times per minute.

I hope this helps; if you have any other questions...let me know.
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Old 11-09-2010, 03:21 PM   #25
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Here is my setup


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Old 01-18-2011, 11:53 PM   #26
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Gearing up to design a coffin setup - this is really helpful stuff. Thanks for posting.

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Old 01-19-2011, 01:52 PM   #27
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Gearing up to design a coffin setup - this is really helpful stuff. Thanks for posting.


Thanks! Glad to hear it. Been going strong for several months now and the first pint is as good as the second, and the third, etc
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Old 05-16-2011, 03:19 AM   #28
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I just took delivery of a Danby 10.2 cu. ft. chest freezer. It is a monster that can fit 8 corneys if I want. I will do at most six and probably 4 or 5 and use the rest of the space for fermenting lagers or storing ingredients.

I didn't do enough reading on this subject before I bought this thing and perhaps this has been answered else ware but, how are most people attaching the hinges and where are they attached? Does the flat table top flip up or does the whole thing collar includes raise up? I could see advantages to the whole thing lifting up but I wonder how I find hinges that will deal with the weight.

I used 2x6 to build a basic collar and have the original top resting on it now. In the future I was planning on "padding out" the 2x6 collar with some 1/2" thick nice looking wood so it looks better and will go flush with the outside edge of the freezer. This is kind of hard to describe with out pictures.

Ultimately, I would like to build a cooled tower/coffin top with 4 - 6 taps and room for up to 8 taps. I would like the table top to have some glass tile on it or something nice looking but the weight of this thing fully loaded with taps, wood, tile etc. and lifting that up and having it stay up while I switch out kegs kind of scares me. Any suggestions of parts (hinges especially) would be appreciated.

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Old 05-17-2011, 11:08 AM   #29
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how are most people attaching the hinges and where are they attached? Does the flat table top flip up or does the whole thing collar includes raise up? I could see advantages to the whole thing lifting up but I wonder how I find hinges that will deal with the weight.
Mine is designed more or less like a car hood with a piece of 1x2 as a 'prop'..

Some guys do design it so that the collar lifts up with the lid. They seem to be most concerned with lifting cornies in over the higher collar. Lifting the weight of the lid/collar/coffin assembly seemed to be too much for the OEM freezer hinges to me. Plus I wanted more a finished look. Having the door break in the middle of my panels just wouldn't look right.

In my case, I simply detached the original lid and spring loaded hinges from the freezer compartment. I then glued my 2x6 collar to the freezer body with a healthy bead of silicone (no screws) The original lid and hinge assembly was then just mounted to the 2x8 collar with sturdy 1 1/4 inch screws. The surface of the keezer, along with the coffin, simply lift up and get propped with the 1x2 while loading/unloading.


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I used 2x6 to build a basic collar and have the original top resting on it now. In the future I was planning on "padding out" the 2x6 collar with some 1/2" thick nice looking wood so it looks better and will go flush with the outside edge of the freezer. This is kind of hard to describe with out pictures.
I think I get what you are going for--more of a 'finished' look. You can use wood to finish out the collar-no problem. Just pay attention to the freezer's specs regarding sidewall clearances. In my case (above in the thread) I went with finished panels that are easily removable and mounted to the face with small screws. This works perfectly with my freezer's recommended sidewall clearance of only 3/4".

Hope this info helps, congrats on your decision to build a keezer--you won't regret it.
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Old 05-17-2011, 03:28 PM   #30
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Thanks for the info. Now I'm off to find some nice looking 1/2" plywood to go on top of the 2x6. I will also get some kind of table top instead of the original lid. I am thinking of getting some copper sheet metal for the bar top but we'll see how much it costs.



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