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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > CO2 Tank in the Fridge or Out?
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Old 05-25-2007, 04:18 PM   #11
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And here once again for your viewing and reading pleasure is my generic response whenever the subject of cold or warm CO2 cylinders comes up. Enjoy my friends!

CO2 in a liquid/vapor state has a direct pressure/temperature relationship, as can be seen in the chart below. The pressure will stay the same, at a given temperature, until all the liquid has been vaporized. Once only vapor exists, the pressure in the tank will drop rapidly.



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Old 05-27-2007, 04:18 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnsma22
CO2 in a liquid/vapor state has a direct pressure/temperature relationship, as can be seen in the chart below. The pressure will stay the same, at a given temperature, until all the liquid has been vaporized. Once only vapor exists, the pressure in the tank will drop rapidly.
in other words, the tank pressure gauge is effectively a thermometer, unless you happen to look at it when you're pouring that last all-vapor pint. I still don't know why I have one...
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Old 05-27-2007, 04:28 AM   #13
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The tank contains a given volume of CO2. That volume reacts with temperature to vary the pressure. Whether it's cool or not does not alter the volume. Once the gas has turned to liquid, the head pressure will remain constant at a given temperature until the volume is insufficient to maintain it. Then it drops rapidly. Whether or not the tank has been cooled prior to filling shouldn't alter the volume that's put into it, but it may have something to do with making it easier to fill. I can't comment there. In any case, you still get the same amount of gas.

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Old 05-27-2007, 02:40 PM   #14
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I started with my tank inside and moved it outside to make room for another keg. I also like to be able to disconnect the tank easily for portable use. Of course, I now have two five pound tanks & regulators.

Even with a 5 pound tank, once you hit 200 psi you'll have enough for another keg or two, but it's time to refill, there's no liquid left.

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Old 05-27-2007, 04:25 PM   #15
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one thing about keeping co2 in the fridge is that you need to be more careful about making adjustments to the regulator psi.

i have my co2 outside, but i have secondary regulators inside the kegerator, and adjustments need to be slow and methodical. the gauges won't change immediately like they do in room temperature, so if you keep your co2 in the fridge, make small changes and check back in a few hours, don't try to make a change and expect to see it and overcorrect, then have to recorrect it later.

as far as ways to put the co2 out of the kegerator: i used a flare bulkhead connector through the door. this was easier for me since i use all flared connectors for pretty much everything. i've also seen designs with npt nipples and female threaded barb nipples, and attaching the gas line with clamps. some people just drill a hole the size of their tubing and just put their tubing directly through the door.

also, if you want to look for a coolant line, drill from the inside, not the outside. you want to drill the inside, search for a coolant line, if one is found, drill in a different location until you find an area that is safe to drill, then drill to the outside. if you drill from the outside first, then you will possibly have multiple holes on the outside of the fridge which looks pretty bad. you could also get very lucky when drilling from the outside and only have to drill once though. it's up to you.

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Old 05-27-2007, 07:23 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gnef
one thing about keeping co2 in the fridge is that you need to be more careful about making adjustments to the regulator psi.
gnef is absolutely right about that. I forgot to mention that in my post. The elastomer that the diaphragms are made of react more slowly to a change in output pressure when they are cold. So for example, if you wanted to change the output pressure from 10 to 15 psi it is best to set it to 12 psi or so and it will creep up slowly to 15 psi. That is just an example. Your mileage may vary.
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Old 05-29-2007, 06:05 AM   #17
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I have been getting Co2 bottles filled for years for paint ball games and I always put mine in the freezer before taking them to get it filled. They tell me it takes less for them to fill it. I think what they are doing is clear the some what empty bottle and chilling it before they fill it. This has been told to me by a few different places that fill my bottles for me.
I haven't gone to keg's yet but I will probably do the same to my Co2 bottles when I do.
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