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Old 08-10-2012, 04:12 AM   #1
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Default CO2 Regulator Options

I am looking to get started in kegging and was hoping to get some opinions on CO2 regulators. I was looking at a triple gauge - 2 product/2 pressure regulator that I can get for about $90, but I am not sure that I need it. Since most beers are usualled carbonated between 2.2 and 2.6 volumes of CO2 do I need a regulator that can be adjusted to two different pressures, or should I save the money and buy and dual gauge, single pressure regulator instead.

More about me, I plan to have 3-4 corny kegs full at all times in a keezer. I usually brew wheat beers, and various ales (PA, IPA, ESB, etc) with the ocassional (very rarely) stout or porter.

So let me know what you guys (and ladies) think is the best route for me to go with this keezer build. THANKS!

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Old 08-10-2012, 04:16 AM   #2
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I went with Taprite, and you can always add a body if the need presents itself.

Personally, I like having two pressures, 9psi and 30psi. I carbonate at room temp and use the high pressure line to seal kegs.

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Old 08-12-2012, 12:57 AM   #3
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The hubby wanted to go with the dual when we started kegging about 5 yr ago, I talked him into starting with one that we can add on to later. So far we haven't bothered to do that. I like the set and forget method for carbing and so far we've been okay keeping everything around 2.6 vols CO2 (up to 6 kegs at any one time - mostly wheats, Belgians, PA's and IPA's, stouts, the rare lager). If you're more finicky about carbing to style you probably want to go with the dual body. 90$ actually sounds like a decent price.

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Old 08-12-2012, 01:23 AM   #4
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I went with a 2 keg system, taprite reg and 2 port manifold, thinking that's all I would ever need. One big problem, how do I carb a keg while serving 2 others? I was going to order another 2 port manifold and join them together, but I have decided to order a add-a-body so I can carb at a higher pressure or serve a beer with a different carb level. I would have saved some money if I had thought about this before ordering.

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Old 08-12-2012, 01:28 AM   #5
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I used to have a triple, but then I ended up with a better fit with a single pressure and a 4-way distributor. I like my beers pretty well carbed, and so one pressure works for me for all my kegs.

If someone really wants to have two different pressures, say, soda and beer, or a low carbed barleywine and a highly carbed weizen, then two regulators would be needed. I'm happy with one pressure, all the time.

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Old 08-12-2012, 01:35 AM   #6
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I've wanted a dual-pressure for as long as I've been kegging... 6 years or so now. I'm finally going to pull the trigger on one of them since building a 6-tap keezer, as I want to have one keg for apfelwein, carb'd up to a higher pressure than everything else.

But really it's just an excuse to buy it, since I have two CO2 tanks anyway, and now have a lagering fridge where I'm going to want to carbonate my kegs, so I need a second regulator. If I'm going to buy a regulator, I figure I might as well buy a dual-pressure version...

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Old 08-13-2012, 06:53 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oze152 View Post
I am looking to get started in kegging and was hoping to get some opinions on CO2 regulators. I was looking at a triple gauge - 2 product/2 pressure regulator that I can get for about $90, but I am not sure that I need it. Since most beers are usualled carbonated between 2.2 and 2.6 volumes of CO2 do I need a regulator that can be adjusted to two different pressures, or should I save the money and buy and dual gauge, single pressure regulator instead.

More about me, I plan to have 3-4 corny kegs full at all times in a keezer. I usually brew wheat beers, and various ales (PA, IPA, ESB, etc) with the ocassional (very rarely) stout or porter.

So let me know what you guys (and ladies) think is the best route for me to go with this keezer build. THANKS!
Since you are just starting out go with a single pressure, 2 gauge regulator. Then later, if you need multiple pressures you can buy a multi-pressure secondary regulator set and feed the secondary set with your original primary cranked up to 45 PSI. At the same time you can tap off the 45 PSI pressure between the primary and secondarys to force carbonate kegs.
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