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-   -   CO2-Proof Tubing (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/co2-proof-tubing-142891/)

-TPM- 10-22-2009 04:52 AM

CO2-Proof Tubing
 
In my search for a CO2 tank I came across a site that sells CO2-Proof Tubing. It claimed that normal airline tubing can lose up to 20% of CO2 through its membrane. Does anyone know if that's true/is it worth buying?

The site: http://www.co2-canisters.com/index1.html

Scut_Monkey 10-22-2009 05:45 AM

You could figure out cost wise if it's worth it. I'm sure it's more expensive then a typical beer gas line so you could figure what 20% in gas savings would be for the extra cost of the tubing. However, I'm sure it's only a partial truth that 20% is lost through the tubing.

-TPM- 10-22-2009 05:50 AM

Yeah 20% sounded pretty high to me too. It's $0.89 a foot, but really it's not so much the cost saving but saving the hassle of refilling the tank.

Yuri_Rage 10-22-2009 05:55 AM

I'd be surprised if CO2 can escape in any appreciable volume through the significant thickness of beverage tubing.

Click here: http://www.micromatic.com/draft-keg-...549NE1200.html.

Scut_Monkey 10-22-2009 05:58 AM

Yuri,

What is the link for? I see that the hose wall thickness is ~1/16 inch. Was this your point? I just don't want to be the guy that misses the point.

Yuri_Rage 10-22-2009 06:03 AM

I linked to standard gas tubing for draft systems. The wall thickness is 1/8". The stuff's actually pretty stout if you've ever seen it or used it.

Additionally, the tubing I linked is polyethylene, not silicone. The OP's site only states that silicone is poor for CO2 use.

jaobrien6 10-22-2009 06:17 AM

The stuff you linked to is 1/6" wall. 5/16" ID, 7/16" OD. That's 2/16" for the walls, 1/16" each. Am I missing something too?

Edit: As to the OP's question, no clue about the CO2 permeability of normal gas line, but the stuff you linked to is 4mm ID, which is between 1/6" and 1/7", with only 1mm thick walls. I don't know what kind of fittings you'd use with that, or if it would stand up to much pressure.

Yuri_Rage 10-22-2009 01:34 PM

Sorry, you're right. 1/16" wall.

david_42 10-22-2009 01:35 PM

I've had CO2 lines sitting pressurized for weeks without the tank valve being open. I think the loss is as close to zero as one could measure. So, I'm calling BS.

-TPM- 10-22-2009 01:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jaobrien6 (Post 1625355)
Edit: As to the OP's question, no clue about the CO2 permeability of normal gas line, but the stuff you linked to is 4mm ID, which is between 1/6" and 1/7", with only 1mm thick walls. I don't know what kind of fittings you'd use with that, or if it would stand up to much pressure.

That's a good point, they don't seem to have any other thicknesses either so this maybe pointless. I'll dig around and see if I can find anything else.


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