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Old 08-28-2007, 10:46 AM   #1
Ken Powell
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Default Co2 or Nitrogen beer blend?

I was wondering what to push my porter with co2 or nitrogen beer blend...does it make much difference on taste? Currently I don't have the proper set up for nitrogen blend.

Thanks

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Old 08-28-2007, 11:56 AM   #2
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I wouldn't think it matters at all just for dispensing. Carbonation with nitrogen blend gives you a creamier head but the cost is double or more than what straight co2 will cost. Here in Hotlanta Cintas want's $35 for a 5 lb. bottle.

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Old 08-28-2007, 12:41 PM   #3
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cool...I was just wondering if the blend was merely for looks as far as the pour goes. Wasn't sure if the blend would have and effect on taste or not.

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Old 08-28-2007, 05:07 PM   #4
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Yes, it affects the mouthfeel and flavors of the beer, mainly due to the aromatics.

don't believe me? pour a Guinness draft, and once you have the full creamy head...remove it with a spoon. Then drink your Guinness and try not to make nasty faces.

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Old 08-28-2007, 07:46 PM   #5
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Well, hence the reason for the post...knowing good and well what a Guinness taste like and how it is dispensed prompted the question. I was also wondering at what point do you start dispensing with a blend? Wasn't sure how porters were generally dispensed. I know Guinness is a blend. So, should a porter? Not far from a stout.

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Old 08-28-2007, 08:49 PM   #6
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I don't know why you couldn't dispense a porter with beer gas. Boddingtons Pub Ale is done this way I believe. My understanding (which could be wrong) with using beer gas though is that it doesn't do a very good job of actually carbonating the beer. The Nitrogen doesn't get absorbed the same way as the CO2. I think you would have better luck with it if you used regular old CO2 to carb the beer, then switch over to bg for serving. I also think you will need a stout faucet to get the desired result.

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Old 08-28-2007, 09:17 PM   #7
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The gas in beer gas has really no effect on tastes besides keeping the beer carbed. The mouth feel and creaminess that you get when pouring a Guinness or Boddington's comes from the beer being forced through a restricter plate. N2 does not get absorbed at all into the beer. It is used because the force that is need to push the beer is so great that using CO2 would over carb the beer way too much. When using a stout faucet you use about 20 psi. So if you're using a normal faucet just use co2.

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Old 08-28-2007, 09:34 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sause
The gas in beer gas has really no effect on tastes besides keeping the beer carbed. The mouth feel and creaminess that you get when pouring a Guinness or Boddington's comes from the beer being forced through a restricter plate. N2 does not get absorbed at all into the beer. It is used because the force that is need to push the beer is so great that using CO2 would over carb the beer way too much. When using a stout faucet you use about 20 psi. So if you're using a normal faucet just use co2.
I'm glad you set that straight sause... The guy at my LHBS has a tap at his house that is straight CO2 and has flow regulators in the lines, he gets the same exact creaminess, thickness, etc that you get with Guinness. The reason to use beer gas is for conservation of beer... The Flying Saucer has all of their beers on Beer Gas to keep from losing more beer per pour (at least here they do).
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Old 08-29-2007, 12:42 AM   #9
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Thanks alot for the input. Yes, I was wondering if I needed to go to all the exepense of buying the stout faucet and extra bottle and gas. I will just dispense this batch with co2 and maybe santa will bring the faucet...never to old to believe in santa are we?

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Old 12-27-2011, 05:33 PM   #10
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Ok. I am really new to the whole home keg thing. Havent actually even set mine up yet. Get the stuff this week but i am a huge stout fan. Especially Youngs DC Stout. I am confused though after reading this. So u believe i can run a stout on straight co2 w a regular spout and get the same result as N and a stout spout? I just dont understand the reason they would do N and a special spout then i guess. Or did i misinterpret something? Thanks.

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