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Old 03-05-2014, 01:32 AM   #1
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Default Carbonic acid

Question for you chemistry guys.
Carbonic acid is produced when the beer is carbonated.
What if you lose carbonation and re-carbonate does the acid level increase?
Put another way if the bubble disappear does the acid remain?

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Old 03-05-2014, 06:20 AM   #2
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First of all, carbonic acid is not a harmful substance at all and it's everywhere. We have it in our blood and it's in all the water and just about every beverage you drink! It's a bit different from what you may think of as an "acid". Carbonic acid can simply be thought of as CO2 gas dissolved in water. H2O + CO2 = H2CO3. In practice, the carbonic acid is not much different from CO2 gas dissolved in water, so when you lose carbonation, you also lose the "acid" component because the carbonic acid will just break apart to again form CO2 and H2O: gas and water, so the CO2 IS the "acid" here.

Getting a bit more complicated, the CO2 that is dissolved in water or beer actually takes on many different phases and exists in a few different phases at the same time. We usually have CO2 gas sitting above the beer in a separate phase, and then that CO2 is in equilibrium with CO2 that is dissolved in the beer. A little thing called Henry's Law tells us that these two pressures are proportional and the gas moves back and forth between being dissolved in and being "on top" of the beer. Once the CO2 is dissolved, another thing can happen and that is that it can lose a hydrogen (H) to create bicarbonate (HCO3-) and an acidic H+ ion. Or it can lose both hydrogen ions to make two H+ ions and a CO3-2 ion (carbonate). How much of which ion is produced at an equilibrium state (pressures and temperatures being equal) depends on the pH of the beer or water solution. The more acidic the beer, the more of it will be in the H2CO3 form, and the more basic, the more will be as bicarbonate or just dissolved CO2 in solution.

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Old 03-05-2014, 07:52 AM   #3
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So, if I let something go flat, it no longer contains carbonic acid? (For the health of my tooth enamel, I'd like to be 100% clear on this one! Lol)


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Old 03-05-2014, 06:36 PM   #4
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There is no such thing as 100%. You will probably still have minute amounts of it. If you don't mind me asking how serious of an enamel problem do you have that you are worried about this?

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Old 03-05-2014, 09:19 PM   #5
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I stopped drinking carbonated juice about 12 years ago. There is severe erosion on my lower 4s and upper right 4, but it hasn't got any worse since then. I'd just like to know if I could minimise the damage by letting carbonated juice go flat if do drink it, or if that's just a waste of time. Lol


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Old 03-06-2014, 07:50 PM   #6
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Understood.

Few good options , invest in a foodsaver with bottle attachment so you can vacuum out the CO2. Or get yourself a kegging setup with nitro. The nitro beers are still carbed with CO2 but the CO2 is knocked out of suspension when it is forced through the orifice plate!

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Old 03-06-2014, 10:19 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigAndo View Post
I stopped drinking carbonated juice about 12 years ago. There is severe erosion on my lower 4s and upper right 4, but it hasn't got any worse since then. I'd just like to know if I could minimise the damage by letting carbonated juice go flat if do drink it, or if that's just a waste of time. Lol


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Hmmm.......Did you quit grinding your teeth 12 years ago, when you dropped those sweet, carbonated juices?............
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Old 03-06-2014, 10:22 PM   #8
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Good info

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Old 03-07-2014, 04:54 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stealthcruiser View Post
Hmmm.......Did you quit grinding your teeth 12 years ago, when you dropped those sweet, carbonated juices?............
Lol, no, never been a grinder! I just drank gallons of diet coke, thinking it was ok because it didn't have sugar in it. Rookie mistake.


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Old 03-10-2014, 06:28 PM   #10
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You guys shouldn't be worried about the acidity of beverages due to carbonic acid, it's almost negligible as carbonic acid disassociates into CO2 as soon as it can. However, most all of those beverages contain large amounts of sugar and phosphoric acid which are the real culprits.

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