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Old 09-01-2008, 05:13 PM   #1
g1976b
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Default Carbonation: WAY too much foam...ideas??

I'm down to my 'last resort' here.

I bought a direct draw 4 keg cooler and have plans to get all 4 taps up and running eventually with home brew. For starters, I bought a keg of domestic light beer for use at a party, and to fine tune the kegging system.

The problem I'm having is that there is WAY too much foam in the beer. Instead of the nice 3/4" head, I'm getting around 4-6" of foam. I've got the liquid temperature right at 38 degrees.

I tried turning UP the co2 level to 14 psi. That didn't work. I bled the valve on the keg...tried to turn it DOWN to 10psi...still nothing. Finally, I replaced the co2 valve and apparently that may have been faulty as the new guage initially read 22psi!!!

Again, I bled the keg and set my psi to 12. I still have problems though. Can anyone provide me with any other advice of what I can try?! Should I completely shut off the co2 to the keg and bleed it off? Wouldn't that cause the beer to go flat?

Thanks in advance for any help...

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Old 09-01-2008, 05:36 PM   #2
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How long are your serving lines and what is the inside diameter? You should be running something like 10 feet of 3/16" ID tubing.

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Old 09-01-2008, 05:37 PM   #3
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Generally speaking, you set the pressure to achieve a desired carbonation level, then vary the line length/diameter in order to get a good pour.

You'll usually want to set 8-12 psi. 8 psi will lightly carbonate the beer, and 12 psi will make it pretty effervescent. This page will help you with the correct pressure, given a particular style and serving temperature.

Then you need to balance the system with the correct line length. 6 to 10 feet of 3/16" ID line should work. Start with 10 feet, and slowly trim it back until you have an acceptable pour. This page might help you fine tune the system.

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Old 09-01-2008, 06:03 PM   #4
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Hmm, thanks for the tips guys. I'm running 3/16" beer line at a length of 5 feet. Using the chart provided, I came up with a "suggested" length of 3.61 feet. (I'm happy to have someone check my math, but I think everything is correct)

12psi, 2.5' from middle of keg to faucet, and 3/16" beer line which brings a 2.7 resistance factor.

Now the thing is, this chart tells me my beer line, at 5' currently is too LONG while Bobby is suggesting I might be too SHORT.

Any further thoughts?

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Old 09-01-2008, 09:08 PM   #5
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Bobby_M didn't suggest your line was too long. Re-read his post. He just asked how longnthey wrre. Trim your lines back to teh sggested length on the chart and report back

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Old 09-01-2008, 10:30 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IrregularPulse View Post
Bobby_M didn't suggest your line was too long. Re-read his post. He just asked how longnthey wrre. Trim your lines back to teh sggested length on the chart and report back
That will have the opposite effect -- shorter beer lines mean more foam, not less. My thought is, this is a domestic light beer he's pouring -- it's probably already got two and a half volumes of CO2 in it. The last thing he needs to do, IMHO, is force more gas into that stuff. I would suggest cutting the gas pressure back to about 5 psi. You want just enough to get it out of the keg. If it starts acting a little flat, turn it back up a bit.

Good luck!

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Old 09-01-2008, 10:36 PM   #7
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If your first reg was faulty, then you may have really overcarbed your beer. it will take multiple bleed-offs of pressure, and TIME (possibly up to 12 hours) to drop the carb level to serving pressure.

I didn't look at the chart, but I know I'd get nothing but foam with 3-4 ft of 3/16" line at your temp and pressure. I also need 6-8 ft at those settings for a foam free pour.

Also, you can drop the pressure to 5 psi as suggested temporarily, but if you leave it there too long, the beer will begin to go flat.

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Old 09-02-2008, 05:42 PM   #8
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Default Update:

OK, so I backed the pressure off to 5psi overnight. It was better, but I'm now getting foam coming out of the tap in spurts.

You guys still think it's overcarbonated beer and I should keep it dialed down or might it be something else?

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