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LiquidLunch5211 12-10-2012 11:59 PM

Carbonation question
 
I have been brewing for a while and the one thing I can never get right is my keg system carbonation. I force carb my beer then lower the set psi and when I go to pour a pint the first few beers are always filled with foam. I keep my regulator set at around 6 psi. Advice?

zachattack 12-11-2012 12:06 AM

Assuming you have everything else figured out (cold lines/tower, balanced system), chances are the foaming is because CO2 is coming out of solution in the lines. This is because 6 psi probably isn't enough pressure to maintain the carbonation level in the beer, so gas is coming out to try to re-balance things.

I'd suggest using a carbonation table or calculator to find the proper pressure for your beer, then leaving it there until the keg is kicked. It'll take about 2 weeks to carbonate but the beer won't lose carbonation as you go through the keg. If your system can't handle the 10-14 psi (or whatever the table tells you) without foaming, you probably just need a longer line to balance the pressure.

LiquidLunch5211 12-11-2012 03:03 PM

Ok interesting. Thank you

Brewerforlife 12-11-2012 08:21 PM

Exactly what Zach said!!! Perfect advice!!

Yooper 12-11-2012 08:35 PM

Like many people, I have my "serving pressure" at 12 psi at 40 degrees. I would suggest that having two (or more) different pressures- one as a "carbing" pressure and one as a "serving" pressure is the problem.

"Force carbing" means not using priming sugar and naturally carbing a keg. It doesn't mean turning up the gas and shaking, or turning up the gas and turning it down- that is usually called "burst carbing".

So I think you mean you "burst carbed" the beer, and then set it to a lower pressure ("serving pressure") and as zach said, that doesn't work very well because the beer is overcarbed and will come out of solution as foam.

What did you carbonate at, and what is the keg at now (psi-wise), and what are the temperatures of the kegs? If you still have it at 6 psi, the beer will start to lose carbonation.

TheColorRed 12-12-2012 04:23 PM

I like to carb and serve at around the same pressure. I find that I get the best product when I carbonate at 13psi@40degrees and then keep it there for the duration of the keg.

Used to do the burst method, but I got sick of losing a bunch of beer.

LiquidLunch5211 12-14-2012 02:06 AM

Ok good info. I "forced carb" at 25 psi for 24 hours then drop it to 6 psi to serve. From what you have said it sounds like this is incorrect. How long do you all force carb the keg for? Or do you just carb it to 14 psi and leave it alone?

LiquidLunch5211 12-14-2012 02:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LiquidLunch5211
Ok good info. I "forced carb" at 25 psi for 24 hours then drop it to 6 psi to serve. From what you have said it sounds like this is incorrect. How long do you all force carb the keg for? Or do you just carb it to 14 psi and leave it alone?

O yeah I also set the temp to 36 degrees.

TheColorRed 12-14-2012 02:08 AM

I usually do 14psi for 4 days and then leave it like that while I'm serving it. Helps keep an even level of carbonation.

zachattack 12-14-2012 11:47 AM

If you're at 36 degrees, 14 psi is a bit high. Like I said, use a carbonation table or calculator. Here's one:

http://www.kegerators.com/carbonation-table.php

I'd go with 10 psi at 36 degrees.


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