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Old 01-14-2012, 04:25 PM   #11
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What the others said. I bought a tank, regulator and faucet. I use CO2 when kegging. Once the brew has conditioned, I put it on Nitrogen/CO2 mix (called beer gas) at 35 psi.

I get a wonderful cascade and very creamy head.

Currently have a Porter on this.

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Old 01-18-2012, 01:55 AM   #12
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I primed my stout with corn sugar and let carb for about 10 days. I then used beer gas and a pressure of 25-28 lbs. The first pour was perfect. Each pour since has been great. You can use a carbonation chart and find the pressure you need to keep the beer carbed. If you have a 70/30 mix just divide the pressure by 3.3 to get the corresponding carbonation pressure (I like to use 7 to 8 lbs for CO2).

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Old 05-12-2012, 09:38 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jersh View Post
Oh, and to answer your questions about expenses, the initial setup can pretty expensive.

The nitro/stout faucet is about $100 and then by the time you get the shank and all the fittings you're looking at another $20-$30 or more. The welding shop I use had beer gas in 5 lbs and 15 lbs tanks. I wanted the big one, so I went on Craigslist and found a 20 lbs CO2 tank for $50 and used that as an exchange for the beergas tank, which cost another $30 or so... So I would plan on around $200 at least, maybe more depending on how much a tank cost you, to get up and running if starting from scratch.
Just ran across this great info. Hopefully your still out there for a followup. How long did you allow the process to take using the cab stone? hours, days?
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Old 05-13-2012, 02:57 AM   #14
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What line lengths are you guys using for your beer gas run in comparison to what you are using for your normal CO2 lines?

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Old 05-13-2012, 02:48 PM   #15
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Good question! I found this . . . which helped me.
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/nitr...-length-58878/

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Old 05-13-2012, 06:36 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Newfermenter1 View Post
Just ran across this great info. Hopefully your still out there for a followup. How long did you allow the process to take using the cab stone? hours, days?
Good question. I've never tried carbing with beergas, but it takes ~18 hrs to carb with a carb stone and pure CO2. I wouldn't imagine it would take too much longer with beergas, but I don't really know.

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What line lengths are you guys using for your beer gas run in comparison to what you are using for your normal CO2 lines?
As mentioned in the link above, it doesn't really matter since the restrictor plate in the stout faucet provides the resistance. Obviously not a good idea to make them super long and add excess resistance, but other than that just make them whatever length works best. If there's a chance you won't always be serving a beer on beergas, you might consider making it the same length as your other lines just so you can use it for both if you need to.
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Old 05-13-2012, 07:26 PM   #17
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Thanks Juan!

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Old 11-01-2012, 05:51 PM   #18
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Default A Cheaper Alternative

I plan to us the cheap technique using conventional CO2 described at http://www.byo.com/stories/technique...itrogen-effect. Because homebrewers are dealing with smaller volumes, have shorter delivery lines, and don’t have to maintain a constant serving
pressure, we can re-create the nitrogen-pushed authentic English ale effect easily and cheaply, without nitrogen. With a little practice, you can achieve that “cascade” effect when drawing a pint of your favorite traditional English ale.

1) Carb beer to 1.2 volumes.
2) Drill five tiny holes in a food-grade pastic disk the size of a penny. The disk should just fit the inside diameter of your tap faucet.
3) To serve, increase CO2 pressure to 25-30 psi, but keep it there only while you are drawing the beer! Pressure this high would increase the level of carbonation in the beer in time, but in short spurts it won’t hurt anything. Carbon dioxide at 25-30 psi will push the beer through the restrictor and knock tiny bubbles of CO2 out of solution, producing the desired creamy effect.
3) Immediately after pouring a beer, turn the pressure back down to the pressure required to maintain 1.2 volumes of CO2 at your storage temperature.

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