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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > Can I use the same pressure for 2 styles?
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Old 02-09-2013, 03:10 AM   #1
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Default Can I use the same pressure for 2 styles?

I have a hefe and a robust porter I am about to keg. The problem is I only have 1 regulator. Can I carb these beers at about the same psi and get away it? What PSI would you guys recommend for force carbing these brews? Unfortunately, These kegs will not be refrigerated at first. They will be sitting at about 70-72 degrees.

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Old 02-09-2013, 03:33 AM   #2
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You'd be challenged to pick two beers so far apart on the carbonation levels for their styles.

+/- 0.5 volumes, the porter wants to be down in the 2 volumes neighborhood, while the hefe usually runs around 4 volumes. Referring to this carbonation chart, to achieve those levels at 40°F would require 7 psi and 29 psi, respectively. That's a 22 psi differential.

I picked that temperature because it's the highest that 4 volumes still fits in the chart. And even while there is no data for 70°F, if you look at the 2 volume vs 4 volume curves, the differential only gets larger with increased temperature.

So I'd say there's no practical sure-fire way to deal with that with a single regulator. For an impractical and/or hit-or-miss way, set the CO2 up to carb the hefe to 4 volumes, and take samples of the porter day to day, and take that keg off the gas once it hits a nice carb level.

Otoh, if you could live with both brews in the middle, say around 3 volumes, you could dial that in pretty easily, just use the chart and extrapolate a little bit...

Cheers!

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Old 02-09-2013, 03:45 AM   #3
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Taking it off the gas is a great idea. I think I will try that, and just add it back when the hefe is where it needs to be and put them both on at serving pressures. Thanks

So another question would be, could I inject the kegs separately? Pressurize the porter to its PSI. Take it off gas. Same thing for hefe at its PSI. Next day drop them both down and get them where they each need to be, and then hook them both up at serving pressure the next day.

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Old 02-09-2013, 03:49 AM   #4
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I carb at serving pressure set for the style, and it takes two weeks to get a brew to an acceptable carbonation level, and most it takes another week to be perfect. You'll need to factor much longer time periods into your plan...

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Old 02-09-2013, 03:51 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by day_trippr View Post
I carb at serving pressure set for the style, and it takes two weeks to get a brew to an acceptable carbonation level, and most it takes another week to be perfect. You'll need to factor much longer time periods into your plan...

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Well those time frames were for force carbing from what I have seen/read. Can you tell the difference between a force carb or the lengthy version?
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Old 02-09-2013, 03:54 AM   #6
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The pressure will always balance between to 2 kegs, so since you said you only had 1 regulator (like me) you probably have a tee junction between the two kegs. If there is a big pressure difference between the 2 kegs, you could end up with beer being sucked from one keg to the other through the IN tube (especially if they're full). IDK, but I would'nt want to mix a porter with a Hefe.

If you really want to stick to the style you'll have to get another regulator. Otherwise, you could put yours in the middle at like, 11-12 psi and leave it that way.

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Old 02-09-2013, 03:57 AM   #7
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force carb = shaking a keg with 30 psi or so on the regulator for a few minutes, then set it to serving pres., let it settle and serve.

lengthy : set and forget. Put the required pressure for the level of carbonation wanted, and forget for at least 1 week but preferably 2.

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Old 02-09-2013, 03:58 AM   #8
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"Force carbed" is any beer carbed up by externally supplied CO2, and unless qualified further generally means "set and forget" carbing, which means carbing at a constant serving pressure.

"Burst carbed" is using higher-than-serving-pressure to try to quickly achieve the same level of carbonation. At it's extreme, some folks claim they get satisfactory results in under an hour. If you want to give that a try, good luck, and vaya con Dios...

Cheers!

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Old 02-09-2013, 04:03 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by day_trippr View Post
"Force carbed" is any beer carbed up by externally supplied CO2, and unless qualified further generally means "set and forget" carbing, which means carbing at a constant serving pressure.

"Burst carbed" is using higher-than-serving-pressure to try to quickly achieve the same level of carbonation. At it's extreme, some folks claim they get satisfactory results in under an hour. If you want to give that a try, good luck, and vaya con Dios...

Cheers!
Well said.

Burst carbing works fine but it takes a while to get used to. I get good results and can drink an acceptably carbonated brew within 1 hour. I put the cold beer in the keg, 30 psi's, upside down keg and shake it for 3-4 minutes . Then, set and forget for 1 hour. After that, it's ready. In fact, i'm actually drinking a brew I kegged about 3 hours ago and it's amazingly good !

Cheers !
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Old 02-09-2013, 04:03 AM   #10
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[...]If there is a big pressure difference between the 2 kegs, you could end up with beer being sucked from one keg to the other through the IN tube (especially if they're full).[...]
Really could only happen when the higher pressure keg is filled above the gas dip tube. Otherwise there's not going to be any sharing of precious fluids

Cheers!
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