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Old 11-11-2012, 03:35 AM   #11
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I just experienced this exact same problem with a sixtel of loose cannon. My line is only about a foot long. I would have to depressurize before each pore and then serve at 5 psi in order to get a pour that wasn't almost completely foam. So if I serve it at 10 to 15 psi will this solve my problem on my next keg?
Not with a 1' long beer line. You want the beer line to be long enough that it provides enough resistance to slow the pour down to below 1 gal/min at the serving pressure that corresponds to the carbonation level of the beer. One foot of beer line isn't going to do that, even for a really low pressure/carbonation level.

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The above leaves me wondering if that loose beer line gasket is somehow allowing CO2 from inside the keg/coupler to sneak into the beer out line. I don't know enough about Sanke couplers to know if that could happen or not.

The analogy on a Cornelius keg is the small O-ring under the Out dip tube flange. If that's missing or damaged, CO2 in the head space will be injected directly into the beer stream at the Out post, which causes all kinds of foamy spitting havoc...

Cheers!
I'm pretty sure he's talking about the tailpiece o-ring, which would have no impact. Although rare, the gas getting into the beer line can happen with sanke kegs too if the rubber valve in the spear gets really really mangled. It would be immediately apparent when looking at the top of the keg before putting the coupler on, and would likely result in beer leaking out from under the coupler too.

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im gonna depressure the keg and let it sit for tomorrow then repressure with my co2 and try to re equalize on monday and hopefully not haft to run 16 psi ...

end result mb a little less carbed yuengling... not as bad as over carbed flat foam beer....

i should be good with a flat keg for a day or so as long as it stays cold right
Just depressurizing once isn't really going to do anything. You'll need to turn the gas off and vent the pressure from the keg a few dozen times throughout the day to bring the carbonation down.
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Old 11-11-2012, 06:18 PM   #12
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Not with a 1' long beer line. You want the beer line to be long enough that it provides enough resistance to slow the pour down to below 1 gal/min at the serving pressure that corresponds to the carbonation level of the beer. One foot of beer line isn't going to do that, even for a really low pressure/carbonation level.
So if I were to serve an ale at 50F at 14 psi how long should the beer line be?
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Old 11-11-2012, 06:28 PM   #13
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I had a similar problem when I first built my kegerator. I did the whole line balancing mumbo jumbo with all the equations and everything... From the gauge of my beer line, the temperature of the kegerator, the rise in height from the keg to the tap, etc, I was told that I needed around 5 feet of beer line. I had major foaming problems. Finally, Yooper actually suggested that I go with 10 feet of beer line and store the slack coiled up around the top of the keg. This completely fixed my foaming problems. I use 3/16th gauge beer line, btw. So maybe you should try going with 10 feet of line 3/16th gauge line and see how that works. BTW, if you are using 5/16th gauge hose for you beer line (what is typically used for gas lines), you will need a MUCH MUCH longer beer line. This has to do with the amount of friction and pressure that is placed upon the beer as it travels through the line.

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Old 11-12-2012, 04:09 AM   #14
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So if I were to serve an ale at 50F at 14 psi how long should the beer line be?
That's pretty warm, and my best guess would be ~15' of 3/16" ID line. The only side effect of longer lines is a slightly slower pour, so it might be best to err on the side of caution, and get extra long lines. Also, if the pour speed is problematically slow, it's a lot easier to trim a couple feet off than it is to buy longer lines.

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I had a similar problem when I first built my kegerator. I did the whole line balancing mumbo jumbo with all the equations and everything... From the gauge of my beer line, the temperature of the kegerator, the rise in height from the keg to the tap, etc, I was told that I needed around 5 feet of beer line. I had major foaming problems.
The line balancing equations and calculators assume that a flow rate of 1 gal/min will work for you. In the commercial systems they were designed for where the temps are kept low and the carb levels don't vary much, this is true. When a homebrewer wants to serve a beer a little warmer, or carb a belgian or hefe to 3.5 vol or more, serving that fast creates a ton of foam.
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Old 11-12-2012, 02:43 PM   #15
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ok so i tried de pressurizing the keg every couple hours and i still got bubbles but i got the psi up to about 18 with almost no bubbles except right after a pour but of course i had a shotgun pour into the glass and beer tasted flat ...

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Old 11-12-2012, 02:46 PM   #16
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can someone please recommend a systematic apprach to what i should do i really dony wanna waste anymore beer ...

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Old 11-12-2012, 04:06 PM   #17
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can someone please recommend a systematic apprach to what i should do i really dony wanna waste anymore beer ...
If you'd really like a systematic approach, there are a few things you can try. First thing is to extend your beer line length and make sure you are using 3/16ths gauge beer line (not any of that 5/16th stuff that some brew shops try to sell as beer line; its better as gas line). If you are serving at around 50*F (which is actually kinda warm), try having around 15 feet of beer line from your keg to your tap. If that doesn't solve your problem, then next you could try to get your kegerator a bit colder, say around 40*F. With your kegerator (and beer to boot) sitting around 40*F with 15 feet of line, you should not have foaming problems. If, after all of this, you still have foaming problems, you should modify your the CO2 vols that you're pushing into the keg. 18 PSI at 50*F is a bit high, although it is appropriate for some styles. Still, I'd lower it a bit (like by 1 or 2 PSI) and see if that helps. If you were to lower your kegerator to 40*F and then try 12 PSI, it might help as well. Still, start with changing the beer line length, then try changing the kegerator temperature (and give everything a day or two for the temp to equalize), and then try messing with the PSI. I hope this helps...
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Old 11-12-2012, 04:24 PM   #18
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thanks man i just went in and adjusted the thetmostat by dissassembling it and roatating adjuster i have a glass of water in there and am periodically checking when i gey to my LHBS i will deffinetwly pick up an extra long line and i will let yall know for sure

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Old 11-12-2012, 04:54 PM   #19
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ok so i tried de pressurizing the keg every couple hours and i still got bubbles but i got the psi up to about 18 with almost no bubbles except right after a pour but of course i had a shotgun pour into the glass and beer tasted flat ...
And you kept the gas pressure off the whole time right? I doubt you had time to release the pressure enough to lower the carb level much, so I'm not surprised it took 18psi to stop the gas coming out of solution in the lines. You never did answer the question about your kegerator temp, but based on the info so far I'm going to guess it's around 43°-44°. Trying to serve a highly carbonated beer like yeungling that warm is going to require a lot of resistance to slow the flow way down.

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can someone please recommend a systematic apprach to what i should do i really dony wanna waste anymore beer ...
Start by buying 15' of 3/16" ID beer line. Also, if you didn't answer the beer temp question because you don't know, get a thermometer in there and find out.
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Old 11-12-2012, 04:57 PM   #20
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yes pressure off the whole time with keg coupled and would periodically release pressure ... my ambient temp in yhere was from 38-42 and i have turned it down and will be checking peridically

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