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Old 02-24-2013, 05:07 PM   #671
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Originally Posted by PintOfPlain
Hi

While I note your comment "High OG = longer time" for carbonation, and this matches with my experience, I am also wondering if bottling from primary or secondary has any effect also on the time / amount of sugar required for bottling? As there is less remaining yeast then.

From the 10 batches I have made, the 2 that took longest to carb were both strong OG (1.080+) and where the only ones I had racked to secondary.

They both took 2 months+ with 3-4 oz white table sugar for 5gallon batches.

thanks
Going to secondary will not change the amount of sugar you need to add. Unless you let the beer sit over 6 months, you will have enough yeast to carb your beers. However on big beers or beers that have sat a long time, I will pitch some fresh yeast from a starter or vial. It doesn't take much though for a 5 gal batch.

Your issue is that 3-4 ounces is a big variance in the amount of sugar. You need to be precise and weigh out your sugar you are priming with. Usually 5 oz in 5 gallons is the right amount. Also, always measure how much beer you are bottling because I'd you only have 4 gal in the bottling bucket, you will only want to use 4 oz of sugar.
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Old 02-24-2013, 07:24 PM   #672
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Also note that the amount of yeast (within reason) won't affect the amount of sugar you need. Unless you have so little that it just doesn't do anything, *eventually* whatever yeast population you have will consume all the fermentables. As long as the CO2 doesn't escape, the amount added due to priming depends only on the quantity of fermentable sugar you used for priming.

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Old 02-25-2013, 12:46 AM   #673
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Also note that the amount of yeast (within reason) won't affect the amount of sugar you need. Unless you have so little that it just doesn't do anything, *eventually* whatever yeast population you have will consume all the fermentables. As long as the CO2 doesn't escape, the amount added due to priming depends only on the quantity of fermentable sugar you used for priming.
Makes sense - thanks!
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Old 02-25-2013, 01:21 AM   #674
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No problem. Also, don't forget that the beer contains CO2 before you start, at roughly the volume necessary to saturate it at the highest temperature it's been stored at since fermentation completed. So the additional CO2 depends on the priming sugar, but the total CO2 depends also on how much you started with. The warmer the beer has been, the less CO2 it will start with. The calculators correct for this. In general it's not terribly important since it's rare to worry about a few tenths of a volume of CO2, but if you did a cold lager beer without a diacetyl rest, are shooting for a high carb level, and plan to bottle, you'll want to be careful.

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Old 02-25-2013, 04:40 PM   #675
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Zeg, about a year ago I was bottling a batch that I noticed 2 things about...first, it seemed noticeably carbed and second the FG was unexpectedly high. I bottled it anyhow without any adjustment and all worked out fine. Since then I made a wine kit and they have you degas the wine before you take a gravity reading and I was amazed at how much gas pressure there was after covering the test container with one hand and shaking vigorously. This made me wonder if it is possible my beer batch batch had relatively high CO2 saturation.
So, should we all be degassing the beer before the FG reading? Or does the standard hydrometer factor "normal" CO2 saturation in somehow? On a related note, how valid would it be to open a bottle, shake all the gas out and take a belated FG reading? I realize these questions mean very little relative to any change in process....just things I wonder about!

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Old 02-25-2013, 07:18 PM   #676
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This thread http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f128/doe...ravity-286783/ has a post by AJ Delange about disolved CO2 affecting the gravity reading. I checked and found that sometimes the reading goes down after degassing.

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Old 02-25-2013, 07:44 PM   #677
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The linked thread is accurate, as far as I can tell. Based on this article (sorry, I think it's behind a paywall), the density change from dissolved a volume or so of CO2 is of order a few grams per cubic meter---roughly a few parts per million of the beer's density. So, yes, it does increase the density, but not nearly enough to affect the hydrometer, which is reading changes of a few parts per hundred.

The buoyant effect of escaping gas bubbles are the bigger concern. You should degas if you're trying to be accurate. I usually pour mine vigorously a few times, then let it sit to settle. This isn't ideal, since there's some evaporation (and because it may lead to knocking over a sample and shattering your hydrometer ), but it's good enough for my purposes.

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Old 03-24-2013, 09:00 PM   #678
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Great write-up.. It helped alot on my first day of bottling!!

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Old 04-03-2013, 02:18 AM   #679
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I have been having some issues after bottling. We always taste our beer on bottling day, and it always tastes good. However, 2 plus weeks after bottling, some of our beer tastes weird. Some have had a crazy high "alcohol / burning" flavor, while others, I can only think of maybee as an olive-ish flavor..
We use recylcled bottles (which we immediately clean after drinking) and de-label. On bottling day, we let them soak in sanitizer and pull them out for immediate bottling. (we make sure to shake out the excess sanitiser starsan foam.

We boil the water (and then add the priming sugar / dextrose) , and once it is boiling we add the sugar mix it and we dump it into our secondary fermentation bucket (which has a spigot). I don't overly mix the water to avoid oxygen and stirring the bottom yeast cake.

What could be causing our good tasting beer to go bad after bottling? We have been very sanitary with it, even cleaning our caps w/ sanitiser.

We let the caps sit on the beer for 10 mins for oxygen to escape / be pushed out from co2 as well, before capping. and store in a basement.

We have brewed at least 15 times and probably get a 50% bad bottling turnout, and always the beer tastes good before bottling...

Thanks,

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Old 04-03-2013, 04:19 AM   #680
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Do you just use sanitizer (starsan) or do you use a cleaner like PBW or oxyclean first? There is a difference.
And do you let the beer settle for a while between adding the sugar mixture and bottling? Thinking maybe the priming sugar isn't mixed well enough and some of the yeast is getting added to the bottles unevenly.
Just wondering.

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