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-   -   Bottling Tips for the Homebrewer (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/bottling-tips-homebrewer-94812/)

Whut 02-14-2011 12:24 AM

Great thread, thanks Revvy . . .
 
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While I didn't read all of it I did read enough to learn a ton. I used an old racking cane to make a pickup tube for my bottling bucket (it leaves only about 2 ounces behind) and especially enjoyed learning about how to add flavor when bottling (adding to priming sugar). So thanks Revvy and every other contributor.

Trace


lgilmore 10-20-2011 04:53 PM

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"Are people using Teflon tape of the threads when installing the PVC elbow?"

I used a combination of parts to make mine work great. I took the spigot with me to home depot. With mine the threads were more like a garden hose than a plumbing one. So I found a attachment that was designed female female of different sizes. The one side screwed onto the spigot and the other side took a male elbow piece and fit perfectly inside my bucket. No need to tape. Cost? under two bucks.


LucaBrasi 01-16-2012 02:03 PM

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Well it's been said a thousand times now, but this thread was so incredibly helpful as I prepared for bottling day. I installed a $.65 3/4" PVC elbow for a dip tube, and only left 1 ounce of beer behind in the bottling bucket. I poured what was left into a shot glass to measure it. Unbelievable. And installing the wand directly to the spigot was another lifesaver. Thanks again to Revvy and everyone else who contributed. This forum is an incredible resource to those of us that are always looking for ways to improve our process.


LucaBrasi 01-16-2012 02:03 PM

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Well it's been said a thousand times now, but this thread was so incredibly helpful as I prepared for bottling day. I installed a $.65 3/4" PVC elbow for a dip tube, and only left 1 ounce of beer behind in the bottling bucket. I poured what was left into a shot glass to measure it. Unbelievable. And installing the wand directly to the spigot was another lifesaver. Thanks again to Revvy and everyone else who contributed. This forum is an incredible resource to those of us that are always looking for ways to improve our process.


hnsfeigel 01-27-2012 04:43 PM

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Thanks to Rev and everyone for the tips, my bottling went awesome last weekend with all the advice. As for the dip tube, I got a #3 drilled stopper and a piece of 7/16 o.d. tubing at the LHBS. With the spout for my bucket (drilled my own) and the piece for the wand it was like $4. Worked great!


thanantos 05-27-2012 08:19 AM

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Quote:
Originally Posted by progmac

Thanks to whomever made this suggestion. I picked up the 3/4" PVC elbow at Lowe's for peanuts. Like less than a dollar. It works great. It's amazing how it is exactly the right size. Just apply and tighten the spigot like normal and put this on the end.

A note for those looking at Lowe's. I didn't think they had a threaded one at first, I could only find a non-threaded 3/4" elbow. The threaded 3/4" is in a totally separate section from the non-threaded; in my store it was in a different aisle, so be sure to look around.
Super cool suggestion. I did the same although I had to chop a bit off with a hacksaw to make it fit.

However, with the bucket upright I have to get the liquid down to about 1/4 inch before I hit air!

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lgilmore 08-22-2012 06:52 PM

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yesfan,

Idealy you want that end of the elbow facing down with very little clearance between it and the bottom of the bucket. Maybe it's the photo, but it looks like your elbow is a tad too big so you will still have to tip at a certain point and it won't stop the dregs from coming in. Hope this pic shows up... Note: mine uses two connection pieces to make the elbow, as the elbow can sivel. Cost about $1.50 at Home Depot.


Max2012 10-05-2012 05:44 PM

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I have constant trouble with carbonation. I am with my 5th bottled 5gallon batch and I decided to increase the amount of sugar. Not sure that it is a good idea, but I cannot think of anything else. With my last 2 batches I went with 200 g (7oz) of sugar and after full 2 weeks at 19c (66 F) and 2 days in the fridge no carbonation, zilch. Though the flat beer taste very good, it is ale with OG of 1042 and FG 1012.
I understand perfectly well Revvy’s point “As I've said repeatedly the 3 weeks at 70 is just a minimum....and a rule of thumb anyway”
But after 15 days there should be something?
On the picture two different beers from two different batches with the same time in the bottles (1 L bottles)


jeffjjpkiser1 10-09-2012 11:26 PM

Believe what you want
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NordeastBrewer77 View Post
I think so.... you're referring to the little vent that goes into the hole in the bung atop my carboy, right?



That's one of the many things that can cause a change in pressure inside the fermenter, resulting in a change in the rate of airlock bubbles. Some of the others are a change in temperature, barometric pressure, floorboards shifting, or as the OP of this Sticky likes to point out, the family cat rubbing up on the carboy. There's a laundry list of others, but I think you catch my drift.



Personally, I let the yeast determine when fermentation is complete. When I see that there's no activity in the carboy, I take an SG reading. ~72 hours later I'll take another. If those two readings coincide, I'll consider fermentation to be complete, and will take the appropriate next step.



Based on what? How does one's assumption of the end of fermentation influence the time bottle conditioning takes?



I agree, the bottle conditioning process takes longer than ten to 14 days.



Tell me Jeff, is all this wonderful information that you're sharing on this Sticky part of the education you received at UC Davis or where ever?

FWIW, if you haven't figured it out yet, I don't believe for a second that you have any sort of formal training in brewing, much less one from a well respected program like UC Davis. I base that solely on the fact that had you the education you claim to have, you would know better than to claim such education as a means to legitimize the things you've said on this and other threads over the last couple of days. I'm not gonna beat around the bush with sarcasm here, lets be real, it's f'n laughable that you think anyone would believe you're an alum of UC Davis' brewing sciences program when you're saying things like "airlock bubbles every 2-3 minutes means fermentation is complete" and "If you do everything else right, you don't need a yeast starter". The latter being something you claim to have heard "in your last class at Davis". In my best 'Boomer' voice, "C'MON MAN!"
***You have every right to believe what you want. No one will stop you from saying what you want to say. I just figured that I had to dum it down for you. If you wanted me to get technical with you, you should have just said so. If I read your posts correctly, you brew, you place your carboy in the closet and wait. Then check it whenever. That might work for many people but I tend to take temp readings daily at the same time of the day so I can see how the fermentation is progressing and so I can repeat it fairly easily in the future. The brewing environment that you work in plays a big role if you try to control certain aspects of your production. I'm the type of person that calculates his IBU beforehand based on my AA%'s/Utilization from boiling time. I consistently test my water pH every few months to make sure nothing has changed (even if my city sends me a breakdown) and I filter it. Every person has their own approach. Having more or less posts in here does not make you an expert. I've only posted when I was unsure of something or when I was looking for responses to difficult questions. If you sole intent is to be a douche, then be a douche.

As to the question of my schooling from Davis. Great group of guys there. A few pics from the Sudwerk brewery and one of the notebooks.
****

jeffjjpkiser1 10-09-2012 11:26 PM

Believe what you want
 
3 Attachment(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by NordeastBrewer77 View Post
I think so.... you're referring to the little vent that goes into the hole in the bung atop my carboy, right?



That's one of the many things that can cause a change in pressure inside the fermenter, resulting in a change in the rate of airlock bubbles. Some of the others are a change in temperature, barometric pressure, floorboards shifting, or as the OP of this Sticky likes to point out, the family cat rubbing up on the carboy. There's a laundry list of others, but I think you catch my drift.



Personally, I let the yeast determine when fermentation is complete. When I see that there's no activity in the carboy, I take an SG reading. ~72 hours later I'll take another. If those two readings coincide, I'll consider fermentation to be complete, and will take the appropriate next step.



Based on what? How does one's assumption of the end of fermentation influence the time bottle conditioning takes?



I agree, the bottle conditioning process takes longer than ten to 14 days.



Tell me Jeff, is all this wonderful information that you're sharing on this Sticky part of the education you received at UC Davis or where ever?

FWIW, if you haven't figured it out yet, I don't believe for a second that you have any sort of formal training in brewing, much less one from a well respected program like UC Davis. I base that solely on the fact that had you the education you claim to have, you would know better than to claim such education as a means to legitimize the things you've said on this and other threads over the last couple of days. I'm not gonna beat around the bush with sarcasm here, lets be real, it's f'n laughable that you think anyone would believe you're an alum of UC Davis' brewing sciences program when you're saying things like "airlock bubbles every 2-3 minutes means fermentation is complete" and "If you do everything else right, you don't need a yeast starter". The latter being something you claim to have heard "in your last class at Davis". In my best 'Boomer' voice, "C'MON MAN!"
***You have every right to believe what you want. No one will stop you from saying what you want to say. I just figured that I had to dum it down for you. If you wanted me to get technical with you, you should have just said so. If I read your posts correctly, you brew, you place your carboy in the closet and wait. Then check it whenever. That might work for many people but I tend to take temp readings daily at the same time of the day so I can see how the fermentation is progressing and so I can repeat it fairly easily in the future. The brewing environment that you work in plays a big role if you try to control certain aspects of your production. I'm the type of person that calculates his IBU beforehand based on my AA%'s/Utilization from boiling time. I consistently test my water pH every few months to make sure nothing has changed (even if my city sends me a breakdown) and I filter it. Every person has their own approach. Having more or less posts in here does not make you an expert. I've only posted when I was unsure of something or when I was looking for responses to difficult questions. If you sole intent is to be a douche, then be a douche.

As to the question of my schooling from Davis. Great group of guys there. A few pics from the Sudwerk brewery and one of the notebooks.
****


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