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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > Bottling Lager, add yeast?
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Old 09-28-2008, 04:52 AM   #1
milracing
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Default Bottling Lager, add yeast?

Hi
I'm going to be bottling my first lager in about a week. I used wyeast 2308.
My question is should I add any yeast to the bottling bucket? I'm going to try yeast washing from the secondary, if I get anything. It seems that fermentation is either complete or close to it so I'm not sure what will form on the bottom of the secondary. Also I think this is supposed to go into bottles and right in to cold storage for 40days (40deg I think). I just want to make sure that with that temperature and time I will get carbonation.
Thanks!

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Old 09-28-2008, 05:16 AM   #2
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I'm new to brewing myself having only two batches under my belt (1 kit PM brew and 1 AG brew). With that said, I can't imagine why you would put yeast into the bottling bucket. The yeast in your brew already should be built up more than enough to do the carbonation.

As for sedimentation, you'll probably get sediment as long as the yeast are still active as they settle out and probably continue to multiply to some extent. It's why you'd get sediment from bottle conditioned beers. At least that's my take on it all.

As for the other bits I can't comment. I've not yet done a lager.

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Old 09-28-2008, 05:58 AM   #3
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I would guess you would get a better sample of washing yeast from a primary rather than a secondary.

No don't add yeast to the bottling bucket, add sugar instead. Approximately 3/4 cup corn sugar for 5 gallons of beer. Melt the sugar in a small amount of water on the stove and then add to your bottling bucket. Rack the beer from the secondary on top of it so it mixes evenly. Then bottle your beer and wait.

I am making my first lager tomorrow, but it will be kegged instead of bottled. I plan on keeping it in the low 40's after it is done.

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Old 09-28-2008, 10:44 AM   #4
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At 40 degrees it will take months for those bottles to carbonate. Have you already been doing the lagering phase? If not, I would do the diactyl rest first, then lager, then bottle. You *can* bottle after primary then lager, but you will still need to fit three weeks at 70º in there some time if you expect bubbles in bottles.

When I bottled my Oktoberfest it'd been lagering for three months, and I didn't have to add yeast, just the bottling sugar.

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Old 09-28-2008, 11:15 AM   #5
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Thanks. Yeah, my main worry is that if I lager it first I may not have enough yeast strength to make co2 in bottles. I think I will just try and lager it in the secondary then bottle after that, It sounds a lot easier....

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Old 10-10-2008, 05:21 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilTOJ View Post
At 40 degrees it will take months for those bottles to carbonate. Have you already been doing the lagering phase? If not, I would do the diactyl rest first, then lager, then bottle. You *can* bottle after primary then lager, but you will still need to fit three weeks at 70º in there some time if you expect bubbles in bottles.

When I bottled my Oktoberfest it'd been lagering for three months, and I didn't have to add yeast, just the bottling sugar.
How about 6 months lagering -- think there will be enough active yeast to carbonate in the bottle? Had planned to buy a keg setup at the end of lagering but I lost all of my money on the stock market.
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Old 10-10-2008, 06:13 PM   #7
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Milracing, based on your post, I believe you have some of the right ideas, but here is a bit of input:

-After primary fermentation and diacetyl rest, slowly cool (5dF per day) to lager temps (~34df) while keeping it in the primary fermenter.

-Transfer to the secondary fermenter and keep at lagering temperature for the chosen lagering time (I use about 7 days per 8 points of OG, so a 1.048 lager goes for 6 weeks).

-Then bottle and, if using corn sugar for priming, store at room temp for 3-4 weeks before refrigerating and drinking. (If using DME, LME or saved wort, store bottles at primary fermentation temps.) There is no need to add yeast as long as you don't lager for more than 8 weeks. I just bottled a 6-week-lagering lager w/o adding yeast and it carbed up fine in a couple weeks. If you lager for more than 2 months, just add 1/4 to 1/2 a pack of dry lager yeast per 5 gallons to the bottling bucket.

It's not recommended to lager in the bottle as some fermentation/yeast activity is still going on and you could have too much carbonation and/or bottle bombs. If you want to wash the yeast, do it from the primary as the yeast sediment from the secondary is less "viable" than the yeast from the primary.

Hope that helps.

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Old 10-10-2008, 07:38 PM   #8
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Cool -- thanks, menschmaschine. I had arrived at the decision to use dry lager yeast but I was not sure how much to use.

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Old 01-27-2011, 01:22 PM   #9
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Before too long I will be bottling my first lager, too, and so I find this thread very interesting!

Mine is lagering in a secondary at 40dF. I take a peek at it every now and then and there is almost no sediment/yeast at the bottom. Should there be?

I have heard, however, that one can indeed throw a small amount of dry yeast into the bottling bucket come bottling time if there is worry about not having enough yeast after secondary to carbonate.

Given how little yeast there seems to be in my secondary, maybe I do want to add a little extra yeast?

Cheers,
JWiC

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Old 01-27-2011, 01:45 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jwic View Post
Before too long I will be bottling my first lager, too, and so I find this thread very interesting!

Mine is lagering in a secondary at 40dF. I take a peek at it every now and then and there is almost no sediment/yeast at the bottom. Should there be?

I have heard, however, that one can indeed throw a small amount of dry yeast into the bottling bucket come bottling time if there is worry about not having enough yeast after secondary to carbonate.

Given how little yeast there seems to be in my secondary, maybe I do want to add a little extra yeast?

Cheers,
JWiC
Is there very little sediment in your beer because it's still in suspension in the beer, or is it a very clear beer?

If you want to add some yeast at bottling, it certainly won't hurt the beer. What I have done is add about 1/3 package of dry nottingham yeast to the boiled and cooled priming solution right in the bottling bucket. Stir well, and then simply rack the beer into that. It works well, for those times I lagered 12 weeks.
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