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Old 10-11-2011, 05:44 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by subliminalurge

Depends on the beer. If it's a DIPA or an RIS, then, yeah, you can definitely get it carbed long before it's really ready to drink.
DIPAs despite their gravity are best young. If they aren't best young, they weren't fermented clean enough. I've found hop flavor fades really quickly on those beers.


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Old 09-03-2012, 12:21 AM   #12
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Okay, so then can I age a beer in a keg? Put priming super in the bottling bucket, transfer all the beer to the keg, put the lid on with no co2 connection, and let it sit at room temperature to age and naturally carbonate for a few weeks?



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Old 09-03-2012, 12:53 AM   #13
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I make it simpler than that.
Clean & sanitize your keg, boil your priming sugar, add to keg and let cool. Purge your keg with CO2.
Prep for racking beer from your primary or secondary ( I always go to secondary).
Vent keg and rack beer into keg avoiding any splashing. Close keg & apply enough CO2 pressure to seal.
Let sit for two weeks, cold crash, hook up CO2, serve.

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Old 11-30-2012, 03:10 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by govner1 View Post
I make it simpler than that.
Clean & sanitize your keg, boil your priming sugar, add to keg and let cool. Purge your keg with CO2.
Prep for racking beer from your primary or secondary ( I always go to secondary).
Vent keg and rack beer into keg avoiding any splashing. Close keg & apply enough CO2 pressure to seal.
Let sit for two weeks, cold crash, hook up CO2, serve.
I am wondering if there is any difference in the taste of the beer between the method above (I am going to assume that you allow the beer to carbonate at a temperature above 70 degrees, as per the post above) and the following:

Keg beer and carbonate at @ 10 - 12 psi/@ 35 degrees (depending on the beer and the carbonation desired) for 4 weeks.

In other words, does it take longer to mature green beer at a lower temperature?

I am using the second method and have noticed a vast improvement in the taste of the beer from week 1 to week 3.

Best,

Steve
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Old 11-30-2012, 08:16 PM   #15
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I have a kink to add to this one, I have a batch of black IPA that is going in my spare keg next week but there wont be room in the kegerator for a while. I know I can purge the air and let it sit for however long I want and let it condition but the kit I got also came with priming sugar for bottles. I have had cask aged/carbed beer before, a local nano brewery does one every couple weeks, so I was thinking I could probably do something similar with this, seal it up in the keg with the priming sugar and when room comes available in the fridge toss it on and have it ready to pour with out having to worry about force carbing it.

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Old 11-30-2012, 08:17 PM   #16
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Oh, now I feel like a derp, I didn't notice the second page.

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Old 12-01-2012, 03:19 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NateG View Post
Oh, now I feel like a derp, I didn't notice the second page.
Don't worry about it - I think that I have already made most of the mistakes and wrong assumptions that you can possibly make - but never say never, lol...

Putting in a "carbonate keg sugar" search on hbt pulled up some threads that suggested that the amount of priming sugar used should be less, per volume, than the amount of priming sugar used if one were bottling.

My question, above, probably needs to be restated: Does carbonating your beer with priming sugar in a purged, sealed keg at room temperature have any advantages over force carbonating, sans sugar, in the fridge?

I would think that the sugar priming method leads to a cleaner, more balanced beer.

Best,

Steve
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Old 12-03-2012, 03:48 AM   #18
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Ok... Another kink. 10% Belgin Strong. I want to bottle half and keg half. I was thinking I would prime and add small amount of yeast to keg and rack beer out of the carboy onto the sugar mix and then bottle half. Put both the keg and bottles in warm room (77 deg) for two weeks. Cellar the bottles and move keg to tap. Does this sound like it would work.

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Old 12-12-2012, 08:23 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lhommedieu View Post

In other words, does it take longer to mature green beer at a lower temperature?
I'd like to know the answer to this, too. I understand that bottles and kegs both need time to mature, but if I fill a keg, purge it, let it set at room temp for 2 weeks, then carb it for a week, will it taste any different from a keg that I fill, chill to 35 degrees, hook directly up to CO2, and drink 3 weeks later? (assuming carbonation is the same)

I suppose we'll just have to brew a 10g batch, split it between two kegs, and try it both ways...
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Old 12-12-2012, 08:26 PM   #20
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Nevermind, it looks like it was answered here



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