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hophead1148 12-14-2012 12:22 AM

Bottle conditioning
 
2 weeks ago I bottled a 90 minute double ipa. Went to drink one today and it is still flat and very sugary. Thought maybe there wasn't a good seal with the cap so I tried another one and it was the same. Does a 90 minute boil need to bottle condition longer then a regular ipa or did I just mess something else up altogether.

masskrug 12-14-2012 12:24 AM

2 weeks isn't enough time. Go 2 more and try again.

hophead1148 12-14-2012 12:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by masskrug
2 weeks isn't enough time. Go 2 more and try again.

Would that have anything to do with the amount of hops or the time of the boil? I did a normal ipa and after 2 weeks that was good to go.

Revvy 12-14-2012 12:28 AM

The 3 weeks at 70 degrees, that we recommend is the minimum time it takes for average gravity beers to carbonate and condition. Higher grav beers take longer.

Stouts and porters have taken me between 6 and 8 weeks to carb up..I have a 1.090 Belgian strong that took three months to carb up.

And just because a beer is carbed doesn't mean it still doesn't taste like a$$ and need more time for the off flavors to condition out.

Everything you need to know about carbing and conditioning, can be found here Of Patience and Bottle Conditioning. With emphasis on the word, "patience." ;)

Carbonation is actually foolproof, you add sugar, the yeast eats it and farts co2 which carbs the beer. It's not a complex system, and there's very little that can go wrong...It just takes time.....And if it's a "double ipa" that implies that it will take LONGER than 3 weeks.....bigger beers take slonger time.

ArcaneXor 12-14-2012 12:30 AM

It has to do with temperature and alcohol content. A big beer needs more time to carb and beer generally takes longer to carb during winter than summer (at least here in the south where room temp during summer is 80+ whereas it's closer to 68 during winter).

Edit: I was considering saying something about the minimum of three weeks thing as a joke... guess I was beaten.

hophead1148 12-14-2012 12:37 AM

Ok that makes sense. It's been sitting for 2 weeks and probably only at a temp of about 65-68 degrees. I'll let it go 2 more weeks and try it again.

hophead1148 12-14-2012 11:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Revvy
The 3 weeks at 70 degrees, that we recommend is the minimum time it takes for average gravity beers to carbonate and condition. Higher grav beers take longer.

Stouts and porters have taken me between 6 and 8 weeks to carb up..I have a 1.090 Belgian strong that took three months to carb up.

And just because a beer is carbed doesn't mean it still doesn't taste like a$$ and need more time for the off flavors to condition out.

Everything you need to know about carbing and conditioning, can be found here Of Patience and Bottle Conditioning. With emphasis on the word, "patience." ;)

Carbonation is actually foolproof, you add sugar, the yeast eats it and farts co2 which carbs the beer. It's not a complex system, and there's very little that can go wrong...It just takes time.....And if it's a "double ipa" that implies that it will take LONGER than 3 weeks.....bigger beers take slonger time.

Slonger?

storytyme 02-02-2013 06:16 PM

Once the beer is carbonated in a controlled temp setting (chest freezer fermentor), then where should I store it when I need the room for new bottles for conditioning or carboys fermenting? My concern is temperatures. I will store it in my garage where currently the temp is between 50-60ish in a 24 hour period. What about when it gets warmer and the temps are 70-80 degrees? At what temperature will you ruin beer once it is bottled and carbonated?


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