Happy HolidaySs Giveaway - Winners Re-Re-Re-Re-Drawn - 24 hours to Claim!

Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > Bottle bomb confusion...need help
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 06-15-2013, 06:09 AM   #1
storytyme
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 145
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default Bottle bomb confusion...need help

I am coming up to the end of my first year home brewing. It has been awesome. I enjoy every part of it. I have brewed 20 batches thus far and most recently I have had some problems with bottles exploding. When they first started blowing up I quickly concluded that storing them in a 95 degree cabinet in my garage will not work (rookie error). So I put them in a chest freezer with a Johnson thermo control set at 70. I use this freezer for them to bottle condition and then stay in there until I transfer them into the fridge for a few days before drinking. I was happy with this set-up until I returned from a family trip to Disneyland for five days and found that 2 of the bottles exploded. They were from the same batch and their 3 week conditioning period was to end June 15th. I have followed exactly the measurements given on beersmith for priming sugar, so what gives? Just a weird coincidence? I must say that cleaning up shattered beer bottles is not a fun part of home brewing and I would not like to repeat it. Help please!!!

__________________
storytyme is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-15-2013, 06:15 AM   #2
Pratzie
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
Pratzie's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Northeastern Pennsylvania
Posts: 1,549
Liked 153 Times on 108 Posts
Likes Given: 112

Default

How long after fermentation did u bottle?

Thats commonly the problem with bottle bombs... Bottling before primary fermentation is complete while the yeast are still active. The addition of sugar, even if its the recommended amount of priming sugar, can lead to chaos if the yeasties are still active.

U can also cold crash for a few days before bottling to drop any excess yeast that are in suspension. There will still be enough left to bottle carb but not enough that you would have to worry.

__________________
Bottled: Nothing :(
Kegged: Nothing :(
Primary: Empty
Secondary: Empty
Aging:
On Deck: Deception Cream Stout, BierMuncher's Centennial Blonde, Yooper's Oatmeal Stout, Joe's Ancient Orange Mead, Reaper's Mild
Pratzie is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-15-2013, 07:16 AM   #3
storytyme
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 145
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

It was in the primary for 20 days. OG was 1.057. FG was 1.006. If I were to cold crash, how do you do it and how long? Not sure if I have the facilities to do so.

__________________
storytyme is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-15-2013, 07:22 AM   #4
Pratzie
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
Pratzie's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Northeastern Pennsylvania
Posts: 1,549
Liked 153 Times on 108 Posts
Likes Given: 112

Default

get it to as close to freezing as possible for 1-3 days. I usually get and hold my carboy to 34 or so for two-three days. U'll see it'll clear up a bit as yeasties settle to the bottom. When i take it out (as gently as possible) i put it on top of my fermentation chamber and let it sit for a half hour (just so anything that may have stirred up can settle again). Rack that into my bottling-bucket/keg/secondary and im done.

__________________
Bottled: Nothing :(
Kegged: Nothing :(
Primary: Empty
Secondary: Empty
Aging:
On Deck: Deception Cream Stout, BierMuncher's Centennial Blonde, Yooper's Oatmeal Stout, Joe's Ancient Orange Mead, Reaper's Mild
Pratzie is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-15-2013, 07:54 AM   #5
BBL_Brewer
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
BBL_Brewer's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Kokomo, IN
Posts: 3,701
Liked 429 Times on 297 Posts
Likes Given: 323

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pratzie View Post
How long after fermentation did u bottle?

Thats commonly the problem with bottle bombs... Bottling before primary fermentation is complete while the yeast are still active. The addition of sugar, even if its the recommended amount of priming sugar, can lead to chaos if the yeasties are still active.

U can also cold crash for a few days before bottling to drop any excess yeast that are in suspension. There will still be enough left to bottle carb but not enough that you would have to worry.
Too much sugar causes bottle bombs, not the yeast itself. Bottling before primary is complete leaves more fermentable sugar which in combination with the priming sugar generates too much CO2. In a normal batch of beer, the only consequence of having more yeast in the bottles is more sediment.

Sounds like one of four things has happened. Either the beer was bottled too early, too much priming sugar was added (whether intentional or not), you got an infection during the bottling process, or the priming sugar didn't get mixed well enough into the beer before you bottled it and some of the bottles ended up with more priming sugar than others. Be more careful next time and tighten up on sanitation. In the mean time, you might want to consider venting and recapping the rest of the bottles. Chill them first and be very careful when handling the bottles. Leather gloves and eye protection would be a good idea. Taste one too and make sure you didn't get an infection. If you did, keep the bottles chilled and drink as fast as possible. If it tastes ok, then warm them back up and continue to condition until you're ready to drink them.
__________________
Slots Down Brewery
Stick with the plan....not the sparge.


Never Ending Liquid Yeast - How to Farm Yeast and Freeze it.

BBL_Brewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-15-2013, 08:28 AM   #6
mike_in_ak
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: anchorage, ak
Posts: 544
Liked 84 Times on 52 Posts

Default

What amount of priming sugar are you using? Seems odd. I know you said followed directions, but what amount? And what type?

__________________
mike_in_ak is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-15-2013, 04:40 PM   #7
storytyme
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 145
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BBL_Brewer View Post
Too much sugar causes bottle bombs, not the yeast itself. Bottling before primary is complete leaves more fermentable sugar which in combination with the priming sugar generates too much CO2. In a normal batch of beer, the only consequence of having more yeast in the bottles is more sediment.

Sounds like one of four things has happened. Either the beer was bottled too early, too much priming sugar was added (whether intentional or not), you got an infection during the bottling process, or the priming sugar didn't get mixed well enough into the beer before you bottled it and some of the bottles ended up with more priming sugar than others. Be more careful next time and tighten up on sanitation. In the mean time, you might want to consider venting and recapping the rest of the bottles. Chill them first and be very careful when handling the bottles. Leather gloves and eye protection would be a good idea. Taste one too and make sure you didn't get an infection. If you did, keep the bottles chilled and drink as fast as possible. If it tastes ok, then warm them back up and continue to condition until you're ready to drink them.
I used 5 oz of corn sugar. Beersmith said to use 5.02 to be exact for a carb level of 2.3.

What is the best way to make sure it is mixed in well? I usually put the sugar in the bottling bucket after cooling to room temp and then fill the beer
onto it. I do no stirring at all because I have heard too much oxygen at that point in the process can be harmful.

I am for sure going to tighten up the sanitation. Throughout the brewing process I am very sanitized, but I realized that I had just been rinsing my bottles with water and then sanitizing, so the bottles that were given to me by others were probably not as clean as I had thought. I am going to soak the bottles in oxyclean now to clean them up better.

Thank you for all the replies. I appreciate it.
__________________
storytyme is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-15-2013, 07:41 PM   #8
m3n00b
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Orange County, Commiefornia
Posts: 1,134
Liked 150 Times on 114 Posts
Likes Given: 70

Default

I always gently stir my bottling bucket with my auto siphon. No splashing and you're good.

__________________
m3n00b is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-15-2013, 07:49 PM   #9
BBL_Brewer
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
BBL_Brewer's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Kokomo, IN
Posts: 3,701
Liked 429 Times on 297 Posts
Likes Given: 323

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by storytyme View Post
What is the best way to make sure it is mixed in well? I usually put the sugar in the bottling bucket after cooling to room temp and then fill the beer
onto it. I do no stirring at all because I have heard too much oxygen at that point in the process can be harmful.

I am for sure going to tighten up the sanitation. Throughout the brewing process I am very sanitized, but I realized that I had just been rinsing my bottles with water and then sanitizing, so the bottles that were given to me by others were probably not as clean as I had thought. I am going to soak the bottles in oxyclean now to clean them up better.

Thank you for all the replies. I appreciate it.
That's how I've always done it as well. Sugar in bucket and rack on top. Maybe you just had a few bottles that weren't all the way clean and the sanitizer couldn't do it's job. I started baking my bottles towards the end before I swithced to kegging. It actually sterilizes the bottles instead of just sanitizing. And if you screw up and use a bottle with some slime in the bottom that you missed, it will only screw up the flavor, no bottle bombs. What have you been using for sanitizer and how much contact time have you been giving it?
__________________
Slots Down Brewery
Stick with the plan....not the sparge.


Never Ending Liquid Yeast - How to Farm Yeast and Freeze it.

BBL_Brewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-15-2013, 11:11 PM   #10
storytyme
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 145
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

I am using an oz of Star San in a 5 gallon bucket. Submerge the bottles for 30-60 seconds. Dump and let dry on bottle tree (that was also sanitized). I think it was some dirty bottles that I need to pay more attention to cleaning properly.

__________________
storytyme is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
half bottle - bottle bomb? GeorgiaTiger Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 9 04-05-2013 03:51 AM
Confusion about bottle carbing and temps ScootersAle Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 8 09-18-2011 08:37 PM
Bottle Bomb Fear-Head in sealed bottle of beer KilhavenBrew Bottling/Kegging 19 05-08-2011 11:14 PM
6 oz beer + 12 oz bottle = bottle bomb? Butcher General Beer Discussion 1 03-17-2011 03:55 AM
Can you get bottle bomb from champagne bottle? naeco Cider Forum 3 08-18-2010 03:09 PM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS