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Old 12-02-2012, 03:18 AM   #21
KurtB
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Originally Posted by TX-straggler View Post
It leaves a weird metal after taste. Like if you had a coin in your mouth.

Set it and forget it?? Could you give me psi and days on that
Thanks for all the input
For a great explination, take a look at the sticky on force carbination at the top of this section.

But as a quick overview, you would use a chart like this one http://www.kegerators.com/carbonation-table.php to figure out the pressure needed at a particular temp to get to the volume of disolved CO2 that you are looking for.

So for example, if your kegs are at 39 degrees, and you want 2.4 vols of CO2, you would set the pressure at 11 PSI. With the "set it and forget it" method, you simply set the pressure and let the keg sit at temperature for a couple of weeks (2-3 weeks is usually enough for my kegs). The same beer at 45 degrees, would need 14psi to get to the same level of disolved CO2.
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Old 12-02-2012, 08:53 PM   #22
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KurtB why does it take so long to to carbonate your kegs?

On that same topic why don't any of the charts indicate the time it takes at the indicated temps and pressures for a 5 gallons of beer?

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Old 12-03-2012, 01:50 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by daksin
I'm going to guess that your beer is over carbonated. What is the pressure on your regulator? Over carbonated beer will taste sour or bitter, with a strong "bite" from carbonic acid.

CO2 is CO2 is CO2. It doesn't get "old" or go "bad." It's a chemical compound that doesn't really react with anything to get "bad."
So is it as simple as leaving it off if the co2 for a while if I did in fact over carb?? Will it have that over carbed off taste for good now??
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Old 12-03-2012, 02:21 PM   #24
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Physics is why it takes a while when simply setting the correct pressure and letting the CO2 dissolve (and probably some chemistry, but neither is my strong suit). I am not aware of any hard study that was done in the brewing community to figure out the exact point where equilibrium is achieved. My kegs may actually be carbonated within a week or so, at least to a drinkable point, but because I have kegs in the pipeline I don't even check them until the two or three week point, and often later than that. Besides, waiting a few weeks allows the beer to condition a bit more. If I need a keg to carbonate more quickly, I will hook it up to 30psi in my keezer for about 24 hours, then bleed it off and hook it to the lower pressure to finish. This seems to get good results within a few days to about a week.

My guess as to why nobody has put out a chart that includes the necessary time frame would have to do with the endless array of variables that may come into play. I would assume the shape of the keg and the surface area the specific shape creates would influence the speed that the beer carbonates. The temp/vol relationship comes into play as well. A keg at 60 degrees & 23psi will carbonate more slowly than one that is at 36 degrees & 10psi - though the volume of CO2 that is dissolved is the same. I am sure the volume of beer being carbonated would also come into play. What the chart allows me to do is know that for as long as I have the keg at the proper temperature & the CO2 to the correct psi, I will not have over carbonated beer.

I am sure the amount of time it takes to carbonate for a fixed set of rules (5 gallons of beer at 35 degrees, 2.4 vols, standard ball lock corney keg) could be calculated, and probably has been more than once, by somebody with more of a physics/chemistry background that I have (and the desire to do it), but is it really necessary? The keg will be carbed when it is carbed (similar to bottle carbonation, but without the complications of a natural fermentation generating the CO2). If it takes an extra day or two it probably isn't a big deal, especially once a pipeline has been established. There are many things that this hobby has taught me, but probably the two biggest things have been patience and longer range planning. In nearly everything I do I am a "wait until the last minute" person, but I know that if I need to have a beer ready to be served on a specific date, I need to plan on having it ready at least a week in advance or maybe even more just in case.

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Old 12-03-2012, 02:27 PM   #25
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So is it as simple as leaving it off if the co2 for a while if I did in fact over carb?? Will it have that over carbed off taste for good now??
Leave it off the CO2 and occationally vent the extra co2 out of the keg. Letting the beer warm up a bit will cause the extra CO2 to come out of solution more quickly. If you end up bleeding off too much and your beer ends up under carbed, that will fix itself once you hook the keg back up to the CO2 with the correct pressure for the temperature of your beer.

Will it still have that over carbed taste? It is hard to say. I over carbed two beers when I first started kegging. The taste in the blonde ale never seemed to go away, but I had a brown ale that the taste improved quite a bit (though in reading my notes it does not appear to have ever gone away completely).
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Old 12-03-2012, 05:29 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KurtB

Leave it off the CO2 and occationally vent the extra co2 out of the keg. Letting the beer warm up a bit will cause the extra CO2 to come out of solution more quickly. If you end up bleeding off too much and your beer ends up under carbed, that will fix itself once you hook the keg back up to the CO2 with the correct pressure for the temperature of your beer.

Will it still have that over carbed taste? It is hard to say. I over carbed two beers when I first started kegging. The taste in the blonde ale never seemed to go away, but I had a brown ale that the taste improved quite a bit (though in reading my notes it does not appear to have ever gone away completely).
Thanks a lot !!
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Old 12-03-2012, 07:53 PM   #27
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Perhaps maybe you got some nastiness blown back into your CO2 fitting/line from your last keg, then once you hooked it up to your new keg, it pushed the nasties in? Just a thought, but probably unlikely.

I just had the same kind of problem; never had diacetyl but a recent lager just developed diacetyl after a couple weeks on the co2. Sometimes diacetyl (which can come from a bacterial infection and taste like it) gets worse with time.

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Old 12-03-2012, 10:39 PM   #28
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Perhaps maybe you got some nastiness blown back into your CO2 fitting/line from your last keg, then once you hooked it up to your new keg, it pushed the nasties in? Just a thought, but probably unlikely.[…]
If that actually happened the regulator would be filled with beer. Hard to miss something like that...

Cheers!
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Old 12-05-2012, 05:04 PM   #29
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I once had a metallic off flavor that I did everything to track down. Eventually I ordered a new gas system, Voila, no more metallic taste. I ended up with rust in the tank. I guess from temperature changes and what not.

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Old 12-11-2012, 12:01 AM   #30
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I once had a metallic off flavor that I did everything to track down. Eventually I ordered a new gas system, Voila, no more metallic taste. I ended up with rust in the tank. I guess from temperature changes and what not.
They can rust internally for several reasons. Left outdoors with the valve open they can draw in moisture. I've seen cases where the hydro tester didnt thoroughly dry the cylinder after testing. If you think there's even a slight chance of internal rusting, dump the cylinder and have it tested immediately. I've seen one explode and it aint pretty. This particular case sent a guy to the hospital that led to his early retirement. A cylinder next to the one that exploded flew about 40 feet, ricocheted off a pole and then hit him in the head.

I'm not trying to scare anybody... I just can't over stress the importance of the safe handling off compressed gases. Respect 'em and they are invaluable. Neglect 'em and your beer making days could be cut short.
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