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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > Air Pockets forming in Beer Out Lines?
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Old 09-30-2007, 02:13 AM   #1
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Default Air Pockets forming in Beer Out Lines?

Hi,

I'm using two corny kegs with picnic taps in the interim until i finish building the collar and etc... Yesterday i hooked up my Hefe keg and for some reason the Picnic Tap line has air pockets all throughout. Therefore, every glass of beer is guaranteed at least 3" of head. Does anyone know why my beer out line would have gas in it?

The first second of beer comes out like pure foam. Then it's a solid stream of beer. Putting the picnic tap down, within a couple of minutes i have a couple of gas pockets in the hose.

FYI, the kegerator is running at 45 degrees fahrenheit and i'm serving at 8-10 PSI.

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Old 09-30-2007, 02:22 AM   #2
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How long is your tubing? If it's anything under 5 feet, you can turn the pressure down to around 5-6psi. As for the air pockets, you might have to use hose clamps on the tubing where it connects to the nipple. The hose could be sucking air in if it's not very tight. The other option could be that the beer line has some small holes in it and it's sucking air in, in this case you should replace the tubing.

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Old 09-30-2007, 03:12 AM   #3
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With my kegerator, the temperature at the top was 6 degrees c warmer than at the bottom. This was causing me to have CO2 coming out of solution (at 'normal' serving pressure of around 12-14 psi) in the lines. A small circ fan fixed that problem.

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Old 09-30-2007, 02:55 PM   #4
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Plus, it isn't air, it's CO2. Not a problem.

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Old 10-04-2007, 04:38 AM   #5
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Line is balanced at 45F at 8psi with 3/16" dia line at 25" or 36" at 10psi. If your line is 1/4" dia, multiply the line length by 4.

If I had to guess, you have one of three problems (other than what other posters mentioned):
1. You are using 1/4" line and have less than 8 to 12 feet. At that diameter, the line length needs to be long to scrub off the pressure.
2. You have dips in the line. The line needs to run uphill, even just slightly, from the keg to the tap at all times - pouring or just sitting.
3. You had the beer at higher pressure and reduced it (CO2 will then come out of solution to equilize) or you had the beer at 10psi at a colder temperature than 45F, then brought it up to 45F (warmer beer holds less CO2 forcing it out of solution).

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Old 10-04-2007, 01:57 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearcat Brewmeister
Line is balanced at 45F at 8psi with 3/16" dia line at 25" or 36" at 10psi. If your line is 1/4" dia, multiply the line length by 4.

If I had to guess, you have one of three problems (other than what other posters mentioned):
1. You are using 1/4" line and have less than 8 to 12 feet. At that diameter, the line length needs to be long to scrub off the pressure.
2. You have dips in the line. The line needs to run uphill, even just slightly, from the keg to the tap at all times - pouring or just sitting.
3. You had the beer at higher pressure and reduced it (CO2 will then come out of solution to equilize) or you had the beer at 10psi at a colder temperature than 45F, then brought it up to 45F (warmer beer holds less CO2 forcing it out of solution).
That is probably it, #3. I was serving at 36-38 degrees and then my friends couldn't taste the difference between an Oktoberfest and a Hefeweizen! So i warmed it up to 45. I also increased pressure to 9 psi from 6-7 to account for the difference in CO2 absorption.
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Old 10-04-2007, 01:59 PM   #7
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I had this problem not long ago. I think it's caused by a pressure differential between the beer and the CO2. (i.e. the psi of the beer is higher than the psi of the regulator, or vice versa). Give it a day for the temp and pressures to equlalize and everything will be fine.

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