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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > 3 weeks 70? Is anyone's beer really that good after only 3 weeks in the bottle?

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Old 09-05-2008, 03:26 PM   #1
TheH2
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Default 3 weeks 70? Is anyone's beer really that good after only 3 weeks in the bottle?

Just curious.

Seems like it takes 4 weeks to be pretty good for me and 5 weeks before I actually want to drink it. I always taste after 3 weeks, but maybe not anymore, seems like such a waste of beer.

Should the mantra be 5 weeks 70, or do my beers just take longer to condition?

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Old 09-05-2008, 03:27 PM   #2
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Quote:
Should the mantra be 5 weeks 70, or do my beers just take longer to condition?
The mantra is a minimum 3 weeks @ 70- YMMV, especially if there are harsh flavors that need mellowing.
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Old 09-05-2008, 04:16 PM   #3
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Anywhere between 3 and 5 weeks for me. It depends on the style and brew.

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Old 09-05-2008, 04:38 PM   #4
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It really depends on the style. A bitter or a regular IPA can be done in 3 weeks, whereas a Northern Brown or Amber may take longer. They you have the big beers that take forever to mellow out.

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Old 09-05-2008, 04:43 PM   #5
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I start at 3 with a bottle or 3, but then I stash the rest for a few months...ya know...just till it comes back into rotation.

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Old 09-05-2008, 05:32 PM   #6
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I've got a co-worker that used to brew. He gives me hell about being inpatient when I tell him I'm sampling bottles at 4 weeks. He thinks it takes a minimum of 8 weeks in the bottle to properly condition. You know what? He's right!! The longer they sit (up to about 6 months) the better they get. I like Big Kahuna's approach. Get a quick sample at 3 weeks just to satisfy your curiosity and then stash them away for a couple more months.

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Old 09-05-2008, 05:45 PM   #7
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Last night swmbo asked when we could drink that stuff I bottled on Wednesday (I split the sample with her) I told her we'll split a sample bottle in 4 weeks, then not touch them again for a couple months (Chocolate Hazelnut Porter). She thought I was joking, then got real sad when she realized I wasn't.

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Old 09-05-2008, 05:50 PM   #8
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The yeast and fermentation profile can make a big difference. I used Wyeast California Lager yeast for the first time in a steam beer, and its taking forever to mature. However, Wyeast's German Ale yeast matures very quickly, so much so that I expect to start drinking my 6% ABV Octoberfest-style ale just 3 weeks after bottling (6 weeks total from brew day).

Aging beers can help a lot. But if you brew good beer to begin with (i.e., with no flaws that need time to age out), then you can start drinking them sooner rather than later.

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Old 09-05-2008, 05:53 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beerthoven View Post
But if you brew good beer to begin with (i.e., with no flaws that need time to age out), then you can start drinking them sooner rather than later.
EAC JERK!
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Old 09-05-2008, 06:01 PM   #10
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Actually the mantra for carbonation is:


21 days at 70+ degrees

21 days at 70+ degrees
21 days at 70+ degrees
21 days at 70+ degrees
21 days at 70+ degrees
21 days at 70+ degrees

No shorter...no cooler...

This doesn't mean the beer is at it's best...only that it should not be expected to be carbonated until then.

A lot depends on how long the beer was bulk conditioned in the primary/secondary too.

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