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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > 10' 3/16" beer line, 14psi, foamy & flat. What gives?
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Old 01-26-2013, 02:00 PM   #11
alestateyall
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The cold temp will hold co2 in the beer. If you over carb your beer it is a difficult process to get the co2 already in the beer out. It is harder than just turning down the pressure and waiting a day. You really need to vent the pressure (vent all the pressure off), drop the pressure down half way below your target, wait a day, try your beer. Repeat venting daily or two to three times daily until the beer is serveable. Then turn the pressure back to your serving pressure.

Your experience sounds a lot like mine on my first kegged beer. All that rocking and setting the pressure high to burst carb is very difficult to do right. Every keg since I set the pressure to 12 PSI and wait 2-3 weeks. The beer is carbed after 2 weeks but I find it is better aged another week or two.

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Old 01-26-2013, 02:04 PM   #12
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Its likely overcarbed as BobbyM alluded to. If you overcarb it, time is not going to allow it to stabilize. The amount of gas absorbed by the liquid is directly proportional to the amount of pressure in the gas space above it. The only way to then remove the gas from solution is to reduce the pressure in the headspace (vent it). Then, as gas comes out of solution, the pressure in the headspace increases until the vapor pressure equalizes again. Then you vent again. Its a pain in the ass. So to test out your issue, set the keg for 24 hours with the vent open and let the CO2 escape. Pour it at your desired pressure and see what happens. If its pouring well, good. Then recarb it at the proper pressure.

The best way to to carb is to have patience. Determine your desired carbonating pressure at the beginning (16 psi?). Set your keg at that pressure and leave it for a week or two (like bottling). If you need it faster, rock and roll at that pressure. You will not overcarb it. However, ifyou attempt to speed things up by raising the pressure to 20 psi, you run the risk of overcarbing and messing with it for a week to get the pressure back down. Not worth it.

Do yourself a favor and be patient...also ensure some other tips that were mentioned like the proper line length (which you have), operating the tap properly (full open), and ensuring a cold line (glass is not as important...frosty mug = bad). You may still get some foam or flatness in the initial pour, but then you'll be golden. As for line length, you are correct, you need enough line to add enough friction to slow the liquid down and not foam out. This slows the pour rate. If the pour rate gets to be waaay to slow, you can trim back the line length 4 inches at a time and test your pour to reach the desired length.

There are a ton of misconceptions on this forum and elsewhere about how to keg beer, but its all in the science. Burst carbing is unreliable and inconsistent. Having to drop your pressure to serve it is a symptom of lack of friction loss in the line (too short or too big). Micromatic has some good info on draft lines. Hope this helps you guys out.

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Old 01-26-2013, 04:06 PM   #13
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Here, I determined that @ 38F, and 16psi, I would have a pretty good carb level @ 2.94vols. I'd like it a bit on the high side.
10 feet of 3/16" ID line works well for beers around 2.5 volumes or lower when serving temperatures allow ~12 psi or less to hit that volume. Beer held at warmer temperatures - or higher carbed brews, like nearly 3 volumes - are going to require longer lines. Regardless of whether that keg has been overcharged, if ~3 volume brews are going to be a regular thing I'd lengthen the lines to around 15 feet...

Cheers!
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Old 01-26-2013, 04:06 PM   #14
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We can wait 3-8 weeks for fermenting but feel the need to rush the carbing. Lucky I have 12 reasons I can wait
image-1381958125.jpg

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Old 01-26-2013, 10:22 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by day_trippr View Post
10 feet of 3/16" ID line works well for beers around 2.5 volumes or lower when serving temperatures allow ~12 psi or less to hit that volume. Beer held at warmer temperatures - or higher carbed brews, like nearly 3 volumes - are going to require longer lines. Regardless of whether that keg has been overcharged, if ~3 volume brews are going to be a regular thing I'd lengthen the lines to around 15 feet...

Cheers!

Thanks everyone

I was actually going to come back and post that I tried the "toss a few" thing, and it worked!

I pulled ~1/4 of a pint, all foam. Tossed it. Pulled an entire pint, 90% foam. Tossed it. The next pint came out great! 1" head, and hiiiiiighly carbonated.

Not sure if I'm still overcarbed at this point. If this is 2.94vols, I'm actually going to take the pressure down. This pint has a heckuva carbonic bite!

I've got an IPA that I'm gonna keg tomorrow, and just "set and forget". If it comes out as carbonated as this brew, I'll know to cut the pressure a bit.

If not, I'll know this one is just still overcarbonated, and I'll drink it like that till it kicks.
2013-01-26_18-26-33_423.jpg  
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Old 01-26-2013, 11:13 PM   #16
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I used to even have that same problem with commercial beers bought a new taprite regulator and have not had a problem since could be your regulator??

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Old 01-27-2013, 01:24 AM   #17
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^my reg does creep up a pound or two after i set it sometimes, but its a taprite :/

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Old 01-27-2013, 01:41 AM   #18
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That little rise in could be just be a variable of the gauge not the regulator

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Old 01-27-2013, 06:16 AM   #19
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Good to hear it worked. Cheers

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Old 01-28-2013, 10:50 PM   #20
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Thanks Man

Well, the keg kicked today Just racked an IPA into another keg yesterday, and set it @ serving pressure.

Gonna be a lonnnng week waiting for that thing to carb.

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