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Old 09-12-2009, 11:56 AM   #1
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Default When to add Campden and Pectic Enzyme

So I'm making my first, simple cider and the very first step is to put the apple juice in the fermentor with crushed campden tablets and pectic enzyme. I have to wait 24-48 hours before adding yeast, but in order to do this, I need to reopen the fermentor. Is there a chance of contamination when this is done?

It makes more sense to me, to keep the apple juice in the gallon jugs, add the campden and pectic enzyme to the jugs and then in 24-48 hours, pour the jugs into a freshly sanitized fermentor and add yeast.

Any thoughts?

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Old 09-12-2009, 01:06 PM   #2
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If you're using bottled (pasteurized) apple juice, there isn't any need for campden tablets. What they do is sanitize the must, killing wild yeast and bacteria so that when you add the yeast, you are fermenting with just that yeast strain. I like to add the campden tablets, then 12 hours later add the pectic enzyme and 12 hours after that add the yeast. Pectic enyzme works much better if you don't add it at the same times as the campden- that's why I wait 12 hours.

I ferment my wines, ciders, and meads in an open primary, with just a towel over the top, to keep out fruitflies and other bugs. The must needs some oxygen in primary. I don't airlock it until secondary.

It's good to be as sanitary as possible, but you don't have to worry about opening the fermenter. As long as anything you use to stir it with is sanitized, it'll be fine. You don't have to be unduly cautious.

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Old 09-13-2009, 02:15 AM   #3
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I don't know how to delete this message.

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Old 09-13-2009, 11:32 AM   #4
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Oh ok, so no campden at all since I'm using pasteurized juice? I'll try it your way, since you seem to know more about this than I do. I am a bit new at this, so what is the best way to know that the active fermentation has subsided in the primary without an airlock?

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Old 09-14-2009, 10:59 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DraperyFalls View Post
I don't know how to delete this message.
Don't worry, we all ask basic questions, and the more out there, the less the questions if people use the search function. This was not a silly question and I'm sure many new people need this info.
Thanks YooperBrew, (I kind of miss the Red Green avatar).
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Old 09-14-2009, 11:46 AM   #6
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Ha ha what I actually meant by "I can delete this message" was that I can't figure out how to delete something. I had said I wasn't using pasteurized juice but then realized later that day that I was... So I was trying to delete my older, incorrect post.

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Old 09-14-2009, 12:26 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by DraperyFalls View Post
Ha ha what I actually meant by "I can delete this message" was that I can't figure out how to delete something. I had said I wasn't using pasteurized juice but then realized later that day that I was... So I was trying to delete my older, incorrect post.
You can't delete posts. That's why you couldn't do it!

Well, I usually wait about 5 days or so before checking the SG to see if it's ready for secondary. You can usually see/hear/smell the fermentation. It'll have some bubbling, and have a yeasty smell.

I don't mean to disuade you from following your directions- that's a good thing to do if the recipe is from a good source. I was just pointing out that you don't have to be afraid to open the fermenter, stir it up, test it when necessary, etc. As long as you are sanitary and used sanitized tools, the cider will be fine. You just don't want stray bacteria, yeast, or especially fruitflies to make their way in there.
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Old 09-16-2009, 03:22 AM   #8
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I appreciate all your advice. I'm kind of half following the recipe and half making it up as I go along (Replacing sugar with brown sugar and adding raisins to the secondary). I am a little over-cautious about sanitation, because I didn't realize how important it was when I first started brewing, and had some gross tasting beer.

Thanks again!

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Old 10-15-2013, 12:02 AM   #9
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So, I forgot to add the campden before I added pectic enzymes in my 1.060 fresh pressed cider. Should I wait to add it or is it okay to add now? Is it a big deal I'm adding the campden after the PE?

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