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-   -   is there a proven method of not to get Rhino farts in cider (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f32/there-proven-method-not-get-rhino-farts-cider-355541/)

mfarah 09-20-2012 07:23 AM

is there a proven method of not to get Rhino farts in cider
 
I always get rhino farts in cider, it usually starts 1.5 month after the start of fermentation, and usually disappears in 3-4 moths after it first appeared.
Last year, the smell didn't disappear.
I tried to switch between white wine yeasts but it didn't help.
I usually do first racking after 3-5 weeks
I used mainly granny smith apples and mix with other kinds accoding to sugar and ph levels.
I add yeast neutriants

My question is there a proven way that will prevent this phase of rhino farts?

alchemedes 09-20-2012 09:26 AM

Maybe you could provide a little more info on your cider process - sugars, exact yeast strains, OG, FG, etc. Also, gaseous smells are natural byproduct of yeasties making love to sugars, so it's gonna happen either way I think. Two things you can do to maybe help 'lesson' the potency of these so-called rhino farts are:

1. Using correct yeast.
2. Fermenting at correct temps for the strain of yeast pitched. Not to warm or cold, etc.
3. Make a yeast starter so the yeast is not stressed during the beginning.

Like you mentioned, aging will usually remove off smells over time, but I think you could also degas a finished cider... though I have never done it. Anyone think that would help remove off smells after fermentation?

gratus fermentatio 09-20-2012 11:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by alchemedes (Post 4428370)
Maybe you could provide a little more info on your cider process - sugars, exact yeast strains, OG, FG, etc. Also, gaseous smells are natural byproduct of yeasties making love to sugars, so it's gonna happen either way I think. Two things you can do to maybe help 'lesson' the potency of these so-called rhino farts are:

1. Using correct yeast.
2. Fermenting at correct temps for the strain of yeast pitched. Not to warm or cold, etc.
3. Make a yeast starter so the yeast is not stressed during the beginning.

Like you mentioned, aging will usually remove off smells over time, but I think you could also degas a finished cider... though I have never done it. Anyone think that would help remove off smells after fermentation?

Good advice. The only things I can add would be to use an ale yeast instead of a wine yeast, and use yeast nutrient/energizer/DAP. I've had very little odor, even when using Montrachet yeast, which is known for producing odors in apple juice/cider. Also superior primary areation (post campden & pre-yeast pitch) will help quite a bit.
Regards, GF.

mgayer 09-20-2012 12:10 PM

I agree with Gratus, you should try it with an ale yeast. I started using safbrew yeast and am very pleased with the results. I still get a good 10.5% to 11% alcohol and am bottled or kegged in about 5 weeks. When doing any apple wines there will be period of yeasty smells but usually the rotten egg smell is a sign of stressed yeast.

Yooper 09-20-2012 12:48 PM

I've heard about the famous rhino farts, but never once experienced it. I've been making wine/mead/cider for years.

I always use yeast nutrient, aerate the must, provide proper temperatures, and stir the cider for the first few days.

I make apple wine and crabapple wine often- yearly- in a large batch. Never an odor.

I ferment in primary for 5-7 days, then rack to secondary and airlock.

Kuzu 10-29-2012 01:53 AM

I freaked out today when day 3 of my first graff fermentation started to go all rhino on me. Quick internet research led me to believe the yeasties didn't have enough nitrogen. At that point I realized I only put in 1/4 teaspoons vs the recommended 1/2 teaspoon of Wyeast Yeast Nutrient. I added the extra 1/4 teaspoon of yeast nutrient (boiled and cooled in some water first), swirled the carboy, and within 2 hours the sulfur smell went away and the yeasts went thru another vigorous round of fermentation--bubbling out the top again.
It's my first time at cider, but for me I think this solved the problem.
Below is the link that helped me figure this out:

http://www.grapestompers.com/hydrogen_sulfide.aspx

The article also mentions the wisdom of adding the nutrient dosage in 3 different phases, so I may do that intentionally next time before the rhinos charge. Hope this posts helps!

Beerrific 10-29-2012 02:01 AM

Dap.

mfarah 07-08-2013 05:09 PM

I've done three batches this year adding yeast nutrients; using the two type of yeasts I used in the past. no traces of rhino farts

thank you all for the help and replies

hbrookie 07-09-2013 01:49 PM

I bought a package of k-meta (campden tablets) the other day, and the package claims that they also help in the aging process and the release of sulfur from the brew. Might be worth a shot.

I'd wager a guess that the one that never lost it's sulfur was probably fermented too warm for your yeast and/or didn't have enough oxygen in it to start.


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