Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Wine, Mead, Cider, Sake & Soda > Cider Forum > Stopping Fermentation/Bottling

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 12-23-2012, 10:26 PM   #11
drewmey
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 25
Likes Given: 6

Default

I completely agree that it is just easier and more simple to wait and siphone a second time to remove as much yeast as possible. However, i don't agree about the alcohol thing. Alcohol begins to boil off at 170 degrees whereas yeast tends to die at 140. Also you have to boil alcohol for about 15 minutes just to remove about 50 percent of the alcohol. So i would think having the exterior at 190 would have almost no affect on the alcohol content. By the time the temperature begins to reach equilibrium between the two, the temperature should be less than 170. Then again...Haha this is my first time doing this.

__________________
drewmey is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-23-2012, 10:29 PM   #12
drewmey
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 25
Likes Given: 6

Default

I think i worded it wrong initially. I meant bring up the water to 190, turn it off, put the cider in, wait. Contents in the bottle probably won't reach 170 unless you leave it a long time. But yeah, it will be cleaner, less work and safer the way you mentioned.

__________________
drewmey is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-23-2012, 10:32 PM   #13
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 60,584
Liked 4342 Times on 3157 Posts
Likes Given: 845

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by drewmey View Post
I completely agree that it is just easier and more simple to wait and siphone a second time to remove as much yeast as possible. However, i don't agree about the alcohol thing. Alcohol begins to boil off at 170 degrees whereas yeast tends to die at 140. Also you have to boil alcohol for about 15 minutes just to remove about 50 percent of the alcohol. So i would think having the exterior at 190 would have almost no affect on the alcohol content. By the time the temperature begins to reach equilibrium between the two, the temperature should be less than 170. Then again...Haha this is my first time doing this.
Ok, if I can't dissuade you, please be VERY careful. Because the cider is young, it will be gassy and will easily blow up when heated. Keep the kettle covered, and keep children and pets out of the area until all are cooled.

Here's the thing- you wouldn't have to worry about "killing the yeast" anyway, if you'd get a $5 hydrometer and make sure fermentation is finished before bottling. Or wait a month. Seriously.

Unnecessarily pasteurizing something that either (or both) time or a $5 hydrometer would fix is really just making a super simple process difficult, time consuming and dangerous.

But you've been warned by people who have only been doing this, I dunno, 20 or 25 years. Once a bottle blows up in your kitchen, perhaps you will be more patient next time.

Be safe.
__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006
Yooper is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-23-2012, 10:53 PM   #14
drewmey
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 25
Likes Given: 6

Default

Ha I am in no way disagreeing with you. You are most certainly right. Currently I have no second carboy to siphon to and no store at which to buy a hydrometer. I will be investing in both very soon. I will be preforming the method you described with future batches because it makes the most sense and I know that it will be worth any extra time waiting.

__________________
drewmey is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-23-2012, 10:55 PM   #15
drewmey
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 25
Likes Given: 6

Default

Side note/question...is it likely that bottles will blow with a cider that has no carbonation? I had no trouble with mine but can see it easily occurring.

__________________
drewmey is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-24-2012, 02:12 AM   #16
thewinechik
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Baltimore, Maryland
Posts: 40
Liked 5 Times on 4 Posts

Default

I have made flat and carb cider. I have had bad cider where it doesn't ferment and I had to spike it. My two cents: sorbate the bitch up!! I make wine and I don't get sulfur taste.
I would NOT heat it for a million dollars. It will let out aromas, alcohol and flavors you want to retain.
You can rack it, leave most yeast behind, then add enough apple juice that has sorbate ( boil it for safety even if it should be pretty ok not boiled). After all this I would park it in a cold place before bottling. Then bottle it. Now to prevent explosions I put some in a plastic bottle and I would treat it just like you treat your glass ones. I it becomes too puffy, refrigerate again and start drinking ehehh.
Good luck !
Maria

__________________
thewinechik is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
stopping fermentation Tiroux Mead Forum 9 12-18-2012 03:05 AM
Stopping fermentation C-Rider Cider Forum 2 02-18-2011 01:46 AM
Stopping fermentation Entropy General Techniques 6 06-29-2010 10:48 PM
stopping fermentation DrunkTrucker Mead Forum 16 07-10-2007 03:14 PM
Stopping Fermentation voodoochild7 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 6 11-04-2005 10:36 PM