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adamant 08-11-2011 07:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CidahMastah

you can, but if you bottle carb please realize that the cider will ferment dry again. That is, if you add a gravity back up to 1.026 your will ferment back to 1.000 and get bottle bombs.

The only practical ways to ferment and keep residual sugar are the kegging method noted above, or heat pasteurization.

Are you looking to ferment to a bone dry 1.000 carbonated cider?

I would always go off a hydrometer gravity reading vs. the sugars noted on a package. You never usually know exactly how much liquid you have. Use that label as a starting point and add half in, stir, take a reading, add more in as needed (IMO).

I was planning on pasteurizing once I get my desired carb level.

Does anyone know how much the SG changes between priming and carbonated? ie what change in SG equates to a fully carbonated bottle?

Turlian 11-03-2011 08:30 PM

Kind of a bump on this thread, but I can't seem to find a straight answer anywhere. My current batch of cider has been in the keg (and in the keezer) for a good month at this point. Do I still need to try to kill the yeast if I were to backsweeten now? My thinking is that the yeast won't be able to do their thing at 38F.

FalkyBrew 11-28-2011 06:31 PM

I used this recipe and just took a reading. It was down to 1.004 and tasted sour. Did I screw it up or is that normal and will be fine in 8 months or so? Its about time to bottle but I don't want to waste my time if its crap. I plan on force carbing in a keg and bottling from there.

CidahMastah 11-28-2011 08:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Turlian (Post 3452971)
Kind of a bump on this thread, but I can't seem to find a straight answer anywhere. My current batch of cider has been in the keg (and in the keezer) for a good month at this point. Do I still need to try to kill the yeast if I were to backsweeten now? My thinking is that the yeast won't be able to do their thing at 38F.

my unpasteurized cider will always take off (start fermenting) in my refridge (36F). So yes, the yeast will likely still do their thing, just slower.

CvilleKevin 11-28-2011 08:59 PM

Depends on the yeast.

champagne, wine, lager and wild yeasts will usually continue to ferment at a slow rate when cold, if there is available sugar and nutrients.

most ale and wheat yeasts will stop

CidahMastah 11-29-2011 02:13 AM

i.e. if you want to play it safe... sorbate and sulphite

cgenebrewer 11-29-2011 04:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pappers_ (Post 3159871)
And Yooper's always getting mad that people think she's a man . . . ;)

I will do well to remember this, then. haha

FalkyBrew 12-06-2011 01:11 AM

What PSI did you use to force carb.

CidahMastah 12-06-2011 12:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FalkyBrew (Post 3544952)
What PSI did you use to force carb.

force carbing relies on your temperature in your keezer. I usually carb at about 15-16 (or more) PSI for my set up (34F). You may want to start at 12psi and move up to make sure your lines offer enough restriction (are long enough) for a 16+ carb

D_Nyholm 12-21-2011 11:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CidahMastah (Post 3545865)
force carbing relies on your temperature in your keezer. I usually carb at about 15-16 (or more) PSI for my set up (34F). You may want to start at 12psi and move up to make sure your lines offer enough restriction (are long enough) for a 16+ carb

Wow! That seems really bubbly! I carbed some blonde ale at 14 PSI at 42* and was really carbed, can't imagine if it was colder! Though that was beer, is cider usually carbed much higher?


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