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Old 01-13-2013, 01:36 AM   #1
MarkKF
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Default SG or FG of Cider?

I was wondering if there are ranges of Specific Gravity (FG) associated with what we call dry, semi-dry or semi-sweet and sweetened cider?

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Old 01-13-2013, 01:57 AM   #2
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That is a very good question which I would also like to know the answer to... therefore I'm sub'd.

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Old 01-13-2013, 05:01 AM   #3
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Found this info for some wine competition classes, it may be useful...

I. DRY WINES – Wines that have virtually no residual sugar (less than 0.5%). Specific gravity is < 1.000. Wines entered in this category have complete fermentation (not stopped by intervention of the winemaker) and have not been back-sweetened.

II. OFF-DRY WINES - Used to accompany a meal’s main course or drink by themselves. These wines are not completely dry (i.e., may be back sweetened or may have early termination of fermentation), but are too dry for a Social Wine. They have up to 1% residual sugar and less than 14% alcohol. Specific gravity is 1.000 to 1.010.

III. SOCIAL WINES - Primarily enjoyed in the evening or afternoon with snacks, but may be used with meals or any time. They typically have 1% to 4.0% unfermented sugar with less than 14% alcohol. These are commonly known as "semi-dry" or "semi-sweet" wines. Specific gravity is 1.010 to 1.025.

IV. DESSERT WINES - Full bodied, very sweet wines that are normally served at the end of a meal or with desserts or snacks. These wines contain more than 4.0% sugar and may contain over 14% alcohol. These are commonly referred to as "sweet" wines. Specific gravity is > 1.025.

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Oh, and get a hydrometer. Psychic brewing is great and all, but hard numbers get rid of MUCH of the guess work.
"No longer drink only water, but use a little wine for your stomach’s sake and your frequent infirmities." ~ 1 Timothy 5:23

Currently Fermenting:
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Old 01-13-2013, 10:52 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UpstateMike View Post
Found this info for some wine competition classes, it may be useful...

I. DRY WINES &ndash; Wines that have virtually no residual sugar (less than 0.5%). Specific gravity is < 1.000. Wines entered in this category have complete fermentation (not stopped by intervention of the winemaker) and have not been back-sweetened.

II. OFF-DRY WINES - Used to accompany a meal&rsquo;s main course or drink by themselves. These wines are not completely dry (i.e., may be back sweetened or may have early termination of fermentation), but are too dry for a Social Wine. They have up to 1% residual sugar and less than 14% alcohol. Specific gravity is 1.000 to 1.010.

III. SOCIAL WINES - Primarily enjoyed in the evening or afternoon with snacks, but may be used with meals or any time. They typically have 1% to 4.0% unfermented sugar with less than 14% alcohol. These are commonly known as "semi-dry" or "semi-sweet" wines. Specific gravity is 1.010 to 1.025.

IV. DESSERT WINES - Full bodied, very sweet wines that are normally served at the end of a meal or with desserts or snacks. These wines contain more than 4.0% sugar and may contain over 14% alcohol. These are commonly referred to as "sweet" wines. Specific gravity is > 1.025.
Each competition tends to have its own parameters. In my neck of the woods, dessert wine is a minimum of 15% ACV.
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Old 01-13-2013, 03:20 PM   #5
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Thanks. Anyone know where ciders such as Strongbow, Magners and Woodchuck fall?

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Old 01-13-2013, 04:57 PM   #6
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Quote:
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Thanks. Anyone know where ciders such as Strongbow, Magners and Woodchuck fall?
I'd consider them all sweet ciders.
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Old 01-13-2013, 05:04 PM   #7
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In my opinion, anything around 1.020 is sickly sweet. I would assume a lot of the American grocery store commercial ciders would be in the neighborhood of 1.015+?

Anyone ever made a gravity measurement of these?

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Old 01-13-2013, 07:34 PM   #8
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IIRC in another thread, UpstateMike measured one of the AO ciders around 1.030.

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Old 01-14-2013, 04:10 AM   #9
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Yes I have read multiple thread of 1.030 but in states like mine beer is only sold at 3.2 abv. So we need the sweet to hide the alcohol taste....:smh: lol

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Old 01-14-2013, 07:48 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LeBreton View Post
IIRC in another thread, UpstateMike measured one of the AO ciders around 1.030.
Sounds about right, it was the Angry Orchard Crisp that I measured.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shooter View Post
Oh, and get a hydrometer. Psychic brewing is great and all, but hard numbers get rid of MUCH of the guess work.
"No longer drink only water, but use a little wine for your stomach’s sake and your frequent infirmities." ~ 1 Timothy 5:23

Currently Fermenting:
Skeeter Pee
Blueberry Cider

Bottle Conditioning:
None

In Bottles / Drinking:
Cranberry Cider
Citron Cider
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