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Old 10-26-2009, 12:24 PM   #1
phishroy
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Default Rhino farts first time

Rhino farts.
Im new to brewing cider.
on this batch their was a strong smell of sulphur as it was bubleing.
I read on here that I souldent worry about it too much
To make a long story short…
I bottled the cider last night. I have added a bit of priming sugar to each bottle.
First question is.
Will the smell go away if the bottles are closed?
Second is.. how long will it roughly take for the smell to go away?

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Old 10-26-2009, 12:40 PM   #2
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I never had much of a sulfur/rhino farts smell from cider, what little sulfur smell there was went away long before the cider even cleared & so certainly gone by bottling time. What yeast did you use? Some strains produce more sulfur than others, but the smell should go away. Regards, GF.

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Old 10-26-2009, 01:15 PM   #3
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i used champagne yeast.
i didn't let it ferment all they way.
bottled at 1.010
starting SG was 1.065
i added a bit of priming suger to the bottles, let them sit for another 2 days and now they are in the fridge.

im hoping the sulphur smell wont be their.

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Old 10-26-2009, 03:38 PM   #4
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Usually the smell goes away before you bottle. How long did you have it in the fermenter? Cider, particularly with Champagne yeast, ferments down to .995 or so.

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Old 10-26-2009, 03:40 PM   #5
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I wrote this about beer, but the idea is the same...

The thing to remember though is that if you are smelling this during fermentation not to worry. During fermentation all manner of stinky stuff is given off (ask lager brewers about rotten egg/sulphur smells, or Apfelwein makers about "rhino farts,") like we often say, fermentation is often ugly AND stinky and PERFECTLY NORMAL.

It's really only down the line, AFTER the beer has been fermented (and often after it has bottle conditioned even,) when you should consider using this or the off flavor charts to diagnose the beer.

I think too many new brewers focus to much on this stuff too early in the beer's journey. And they panic unnecessarily.

A lot of the stuff you smell/taste initially more than likely ends up disappearing either during a long primary/primary & secondary combo, Diacetyl rests and even during bottle conditioning.

If I find a flavor/smell, I usually wait til it's been in the bottle 6 weeks before I try to "diagnose" what went wrong, that way I am sure the beer has passed any window of greenness.

Fementation is often ugly, smelly and crappy tasting in the beginning and perfectly normal. The various conditioning phases, be it long primary, secondarying, D-rests, bottle conditioning, AND LAGERING, are all part of the process where the yeast, and co2 correct a lot of the normal production of the byproducts of fermentation.

Lagering is a prime example of this. Lager yeast are prone to the production of a lot of byproducts, the most familiar one is sulphur compounds (rhino farts) but in the dark cold of the lagering process, which is at the minimum of a month (I think many homebrewers don't lager long enough) the yeast slowly consumes all those compounds which results in extremely clean tasting beers if done skillfully.

Ales have their own version of this, but it's all the same.

If you are sampling your beer before you have passed a 'window of greeness" which my experience is about 3-6 weeks in the bottle, then you are more than likely just experiencing an "off flavor" due to the presence of those byproducts (that's what we mean when we say the beer is "green" it's still young and unconditioned.) but once the process is done, over 90% of the time the flavors/smells are gone.

Of the remaining 10%, half of those may still be salvageable through the long time storage that I mention in the Never dump your beer!!! Patience IS a virtue!!! Time heals all things, even beer:

And the remaining 50% of the last 10% are where these tables and lists come into play. To understand what you did wrong, so you can avoid it in the future.

Long story short....I betcha that smell will be long gone when the cider is carbed and conditioned.

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Old 10-26-2009, 04:33 PM   #6
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well, i let it ferment for 3 weeks but i want to cold crash it in the bottle in order to get a semi sweet sparkling cider.
so i botled it at 1.010 and at bottling it still had a very sulfuric smell.

Does anyone have any experience with bottling a rhino fart smelling cider?
I dred the fact that the smell will still be in the bottle in a few months.

But it seems like a very real possibility because where else would it go.. ….right??
im hoping that im wrong..

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Old 10-26-2009, 07:49 PM   #7
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Well, it sounds to me like you bottled too early. Was your cider even clear? If you bottled at SG: 1.010 and added priming sugar, (BTW, how much is "a bit" of priming sugar?) and having used a champagne yeast, You might be in for a a few bottle-bombs.

I doubt the yeast would've been able to carbonate the cider in the 2 days you allowed between bottling & chilling. If conditions were right for it to do so, those same conditions would also pretty much guarantee bottle-bombs. Maybe you'll be lucky & not have any problems, I hope so. Batch size, type of bottles, amount of priming sugar, temp, all these things could significantly alter the outcome. Good luck, GF.

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Old 10-26-2009, 08:47 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gratus fermentatio View Post
Well, it sounds to me like you bottled too early. Was your cider even clear? If you bottled at SG: 1.010 and added priming sugar, (BTW, how much is "a bit" of priming sugar?) and having used a champagne yeast, You might be in for a a few bottle-bombs.

I doubt the yeast would've been able to carbonate the cider in the 2 days you allowed between bottling & chilling. If conditions were right for it to do so, those same conditions would also pretty much guarantee bottle-bombs. Maybe you'll be lucky & not have any problems, I hope so. Batch size, type of bottles, amount of priming sugar, temp, all these things could significantly alter the outcome. Good luck, GF.
Added a tip of a tspn of priming sugar per ½ liter bottle.
The batch was 5 gallon batch.
Bottles used are ½ liter pop plastic bottles.
temp is around 24c
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Old 10-26-2009, 09:34 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phishroy View Post
Added a tip of a tspn of priming sugar per ½ liter bottle.
The batch was 5 gallon batch.
Bottles used are ½ liter pop plastic bottles.
temp is around 24c
I've never used plastic bottles & have no idea what level of pressure they'll hold. Usually the whole batch is primed with sugar & then bottled; some use carb tabs or carb drops, they're just pre-measured sugar compressed into lozenge/tablet form. Are your bottles hardened up with pressure? I think that would be a good indicator of whether it's carbed or not. Open 1 bottle & see if it's carbed enough, if so, keep them in the fridge; if not take 1 out & let it come up to room temp till it hardens up. Keep track of temps & times, that way you can figure out what you'll need to do (if anything) to carb the rest of your batch. Regards, GF.
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Old 10-26-2009, 11:25 PM   #10
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SLOW DOWN, you're moving to fast. 3 weeks is way to fast to be bottling especially if it smells like sulfur. My guess is your yeast needed some nutrients or wasn't stirred enough in primary.
Some yeasts give off a sulfur smell. Could be a sign of Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) present. This could mean they need feeding (Fermaid-K or yeast hulls) and/or a good stir. You should gently stir your must once or twice a day for the first 4-5 days to get rid of H2S. If it is H2S, I don't think your going to get rid of it at this point.

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