Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway - Enter Now!

Home Brew Forums > Wine, Mead, Cider, Sake & Soda > Cider Forum > Quick sweet cider for the impatient

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 06-25-2008, 04:29 PM   #1
jay415
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 120
Default Quick sweet cider for the impatient

I found this on youtube and it looked interesting, This looks like a recipe that you can experiment with and have quick rewards while your waiting months for your normal batch of cider or Apfelwein to age and mature. I have not tried it yet but I plan to when I can actually get out to the store.

This guy made a wild yeast starter that he has been using for 2 years with organic store bought apple juice and an organic apple with good results. He makes a sweeter cider that is very quick (1 week w/ only 2-3% abv) and it is consumed cloudy. It is also a good way to make a wild yeast starter to have on hand.

Here is a quote from the following site:
http://www.eattheweeds.com/www.EatTheWeeds.Com/EatTheWeeds.com/Entries/2010/10/22_CIDER,_HARD,_BUT_QUICK_AND_EASY.html

Quote:
Using wild apple yeast is taking a chance that the yeast will throw a bad flavor. On the other hand, using a champagne yeast can make the cider taste wine-ish. I opted for wild apple yeast and there was an easy solution at hand. When I first bought a gallon of organic cider at the same time I bought an organic granny smith apple. It could have been any organic apple, but the key is it was an organic apple that should have wild apple yeast on it. I did not wash it. I took my apple cider and apple home. I peeled the apple and put the peeling into the apple juice and put it in a warm, dark place. It took almost two weeks for the yeast on the peeling to multiply to the point I could see bubbles rising in the cider. But by three weeks I was on my way.

When I bottled that first batch of cider I kept the dregs, which were apple sediment, some juice, and a lot of yeast. I put that in a two quart soda bottle, added a couple of tablespoons of sugar, and kept it in a warm place, letting off the gas build-up every few days. One can also store it in the frig long term. Now when I buy a gallon of cider, all I have to do is pour off a half a cup of juice, add a half a cup of starter, and then put that half cup of juice into the starter bottle with a little sugar. That wild yeast has produced very well for me for over two years.
Also here is the guy's video of the same process.
[youtube]6Cybdxjf7ac[/youtube]
__________________
jay415 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-25-2008, 09:01 PM   #2
Pogo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 344
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

jay415 -

If this is a valid recipe, and holds up as indicated when I test it, as I'm sure that it will, it will serve as a treasure trove of information about the simplicity of Mother Nature's laws.

All of the studying of winemaking that I have been doing can simply be digested down into the one post that you opened this thread with.

Being a newbie, the lights of unlimited homebrew possibilities went off like flashbulbs in my head as I read your post.

Thanks for taking the trouble to share this with us.

Pogo

__________________
Pogo is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-26-2008, 11:27 PM   #3
Pogo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 344
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Hopefully someone here has some experience with wild fruit yeasts.

I have three fruit trees in my backyard.

An apple, a peach, and a pear.

All are currently bearing fruit from the size of golf balls to hen eggs.

I'm thinking that natural yeast would be the most abundant when the fruit is fully ripe, but I'm thinking that the peels from immature fruit would still contain plenty of yeast to start a primary fermenting.

Does anyone know anything about this aspect of traditional style fermenting?

Pogo

__________________
Pogo is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-27-2008, 01:05 AM   #4
jay415
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 120
Default

I started mine today so I'll let you know how it comes out. 1 gallon of Trader Joe's organic unfiltered apple juice, and the skin of 2 organic fuji apples. Starting OG of 1.050 with no further additions.

__________________
jay415 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-05-2008, 07:59 PM   #5
jay415
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 120
Default

Ok here's an update: some noticeable fermentation started a few days ago with a few bubbles showing on the juice surface. Today is 9 days in and now there is obvious activity in the airlock, 1 bubble every 38 sec. awesome apple smell coming from the airlock. Unknown gravity at this point.

__________________
jay415 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-06-2008, 12:34 AM   #6
Pogo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 344
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Thanks for the update.

I've decided to try this, too.

Yesterday I dissolved 1/4 cup of cane sugar into a pint of warm filtered tap water.

After letting the water cool to room temperature, I then poured it into a glass quart Mason jar, added 1/4 tsp of yeast nutrient, put a lid on it, then shook it vigorously to aerate the solution.

Then I placed one of the largest of the, half mature, apples from my apple tree into the sugar solution.

Rather than peel the apple, I elected to put the whole apple itself into the solution. Actually, I tried to minimize handling the apple as much as possible in an effort to keep from removing and/or contaminating any of the yeast riding on the apples skin.

I use sanitized needle-nose pliers to grab the apples stem and pull it from the tree, as well as to pull the stem from the apple.

I had already prepared another Mason flat (lid) to accept an airlock by drilling a one half inch hole in it's center and inserting a 7/16 inch black rubber grommet [$0.36US @ the LHS (Local Hardware Store)] into the drilled hole. It seems to be a nice, snug, perfect fit.

So...now I've got my jar of genuine Alabama apple yeast starter under way!

The more I study this method, the less it seems to me that I'm using WILD yeast to ferment this batch of Apfelwein, but rather that, I'm using a yeast culture specifically adapted to ferment apples for my geographic region/climate!

How many here have been able to say THAT lately?

Pogo

__________________
Pogo is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-06-2008, 03:51 AM   #7
jay415
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 120
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pogo View Post
Rather than peel the apple, I elected to put the whole apple itself into the solution. Actually, I tried to minimize handling the apple as much as possible in an effort to keep from removing and/or contaminating any of the yeast riding on the apples skin.
I was a little concerned about this as well, It was the peeler that concerned me. So I used a paring knife fresh out of the dishwasher. So far so good no sign of mold, or other infections.
__________________
jay415 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-17-2008, 07:20 AM   #8
jay415
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 120
Default

So far so good, 3 weeks in as described too a T on the above site, I have a sweet hard cider that is about 2.358 % ABV. My OG was 1.050 and today's SG was 1.032. Very nice strong apple flavor and aroma w/ a very slight alcohol taste and light carbonation. Very sweet, not tart at all. I am going to test SG and taste weekly at this point. I want to see how low I can get the SG while still retaining some residual sweetness, apple flavor and aroma. I am shooting for 1.012 (unless it tastes too sweet). That would give me a 5% ABV cider. Then I am planning to cold crash to stop fermentation, and either drink as a fresh cider (as described on the above site), or sulfite, sorbate and force carb. So far I must say the experiment is a success.
My wife wanted a sweet hard cider and this will probably be it. Very easy to make with great results (so far). Upon completion of this 1 gallon I am going to use the sediment to make starters for 5 or 6 gallon batches. Maybe I'll try yeast washing. like this: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=41768

__________________
jay415 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-17-2008, 02:22 PM   #9
Freezeblade
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Oakland, California
Posts: 1,415
Liked 21 Times on 13 Posts

Default

I really wanted to do this, but finding an organic apple right now is out of the question, as it's not very close to apple season, and I'm not out in the country. I elected for an organic peach instead, as I heard there was plenty of yeasty beasties on the skin. I peeled the skin off with a paring knife and placed it into a 1.040 sugar solution a few days ago, and threw an airlock on the bottle (12 oz newcastle bottle) in order to begin a starter which I would later pitch into some apple juice after I build it up a bit. That was 2 days ago, and already I'm seeing some foamyness and bubble activity, peaches must have a heck of a lot of yeasts on them. I just can't wait for apple season to try it out with an apple.

__________________
Primary:Russian River Redemption clone, Kelly's Melomel, Graham's English Cider 22-23
Clearing:Apple Wine
Aging:Public House Dry Stout, Procrastination Porter, Mr. Brown Ale, Westvleteren 12 Clone, Mead, Duvel Clone, Graham's English Cider 6-21, Belgian Draak Strong Ale, Fig Melomel, Acerglyn, Restorative Tonic Metheglyn
Freezeblade is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-17-2008, 02:49 PM   #10
conpewter
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
conpewter's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: East Dundee, Illinois
Posts: 5,109
Liked 40 Times on 35 Posts
Likes Given: 7

Default

what temp you all fermenting this wild yeast at?

__________________

"People should not be afraid of their governments. Governments should be afraid of their people." - V

Primary: Nothin
Secondary: Shady Lord RIS, Water to Barleywine, Pumpkin wine, burnt mead
Kegged: Crappy infected mild
Bottles: Apfelwein, 999 Barleywine, Oatmeal Stout, Robust Porter, Robust smoked porter, Simcoe Smash

conpewter is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Quick Sweet Mead? Seems very drinkable after only a month. KCPyrate Mead Forum 8 08-31-2009 07:35 PM
Something Quick for an impatient Newbie Chicagobrewer Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 7 03-11-2009 06:49 AM
Backsweetening cider with frozen sweet cider benjita Cider Forum 12 01-14-2009 02:11 AM
Impatient and impetuous -- but at least the cider tasted good. JoeSponge Cider Forum 5 12-14-2008 04:47 AM