Electric Brewing Supply 30A BCS Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Wine, Mead, Cider, Sake & Soda > Cider Forum > Oak my cider: two options
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 12-24-2012, 11:00 AM   #11
zachattack
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: , MA
Posts: 2,503
Liked 242 Times on 208 Posts
Likes Given: 130

Default

Thanks everyone! I tried a sample last night, after 1 week on the cubes barely any oak flavor. I'll report back when I grab another taste.

__________________
zachattack is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-04-2013, 12:59 PM   #12
zachattack
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: , MA
Posts: 2,503
Liked 242 Times on 208 Posts
Likes Given: 130

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by KidMoxie View Post
I've only had experience oaking beer, but 3 oz for a month is a lot of oak, even for cubes. I did 1.5 oz medium toast hungarian oak in 5 gallons for 5 weeks in a rye strong ale and it was on the high end of tolerable oak, even ~6 months later.

I'd recommend tasting a sample every week or so lest you overdo it.
To update further... I ended up doing a 4 weeks on the 3 oz of Hungarian oak cubes (6 gallons of cider), then bottled. There was a noticeable oak flavor, but it was by no means overpowering. I don't have much experience tasting oaked cider or wine, and most oaked beer that I've had tends to have a pretty heavy whiskey flavor component as part of the oak. So it's interesting to taste the oak by itself without the bourbon flavor.

I tried one this weekend to see how the carbonation was coming along (~3 weeks in the bottle), and I'm really digging the oak. In addition to the subtle flavor, it added a really nice mouthfeel. I'm excited to see how this one ages out, since my last apple wine/cider tasted so much better after 6 months in the bottle. This one's near 11% abv so I know it's got a ways to go, but it already tasted great.
__________________
zachattack is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-06-2013, 12:22 AM   #13
WVMJ
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Karnage, WV
Posts: 1,059
Liked 97 Times on 92 Posts
Likes Given: 21

Default

Another option is to use oak powder in the primary like the wine kits do, toasted oak powder gets stirred in with everything else and eventually sinks to the bottom before you transfer, if its not enough oak taste add more powder to the secondary, or chips or beans or staves. I like the bigger pieces like staves in the secondary, they are always suspended in the wine, easy to remove and save for the barbeque for smoke. Of course you hit it on the head that everyone has an opinion on how long to leave it in oak, there are even some authorities who say most of the flavor is absorbed in a few days and leaving it in contact longer does very little to add to the flavors. For a cider some oak powder at the start and then some staves would give you really good control and you can easily remove the staves.As far as sterilizing your oak first, you ware wasting your flavor, these are already toasted and dried, not much growing on them, we just dump them straight into the carboy. WVMJ

WVMJ is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-06-2013, 02:45 AM   #14
zachattack
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: , MA
Posts: 2,503
Liked 242 Times on 208 Posts
Likes Given: 130

Default

Thanks for the info. I know nothing about wine making, I've never heard of oak powder! Most of what I was basing this on was the "wood aging" podcast linked in this thread: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f13/tips-wood-aging-119445/

I tend to trust Jamil's experience for my first attempt at any technique/recipe/style

__________________
zachattack is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-07-2013, 12:13 AM   #15
WVMJ
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Karnage, WV
Posts: 1,059
Liked 97 Times on 92 Posts
Likes Given: 21

Default

To bad he didnt know about oak powders, it would be very easy to use in oaking a beer also, quick release in the primary fermentor, drops right out with the yeast after the fermentation is done. I can understand the worry about some contamination when making low alcohol beer, but in wine and mead I have never had any problems with contamination from oak adding it in primary or secondary. There are only slightly more opinions on using oak than there are people using oak WVMJ

WVMJ is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-20-2013, 02:07 AM   #16
ToiletBrew
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 8
Default

Well,
I'm not making cider like you guys, I'm making toilet wine. I used SuperSmoother in my first batch it came out pretty good. The second batch I did not use it and it consistantly gave me acid reflux.
Super Smoother has liquid oak extract and glycerin.
You probably won't want to add the glycerin to your cider.

__________________
ToiletBrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-20-2013, 02:17 AM   #17
ToiletBrew
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 8
Default

Ok this is on the exact oppisite end of the oak spectrum.
I got one of these in a 5 liter version and used it to age some tequila back in the day for a big party we were having. It tasted fantastic. I mean amazing, smooth sippin.
Don't bother with the 5 liter version you need the 10 liter.
After you age your cider you can age some whiskey. Canadian Club put out a limited production Sherry Cask aged whiskey some years back and it was off the hook. You can get this on the bay for about $130 delivered.

__________________
ToiletBrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-21-2013, 04:11 PM   #18
Thegreatestgray
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Running Springs, California
Posts: 144
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts

Default

What about using apple wood has anyone tried this for their ciders

__________________
Thegreatestgray is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-25-2013, 04:49 PM   #19
Alfonsotropolos
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Lewes, East Sussex, England
Posts: 22
Likes Given: 8

Default

Here is a bit of stuff I recently came across, hopefully it helps a bit, let me know if you’d like to know more.

Volatile phenols released by wood in wine.

B-Methyl-y-octalactone – Coconut aroma
Eugenol – Smoky spicy aromas
Vanillin- Take a guess

In barrel-fermented wines there is less vanillin due to the reduction of vanillin by yeasts into vanillin alcohol which is almost odourless. Late barrelling and prematurely eliminating lees will produce white wines with excessive wood character; these techniques should only really be used with red wines.

I’m assuming you could apply this knowledge to cider making, if you are making a delicate light cider then perhaps you should ferment on the oak. If you are making a very strongly flavoured cider than aging on oak after fermentation may marry the flavour better.

I stole this info from:

Ribereau-Gayon, P., 2001. Handbook of Enology Volume 1: The Microbiology of Wine and Vinifications. New York: John Wiley & Sons.

__________________
Alfonsotropolos is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-26-2013, 01:54 PM   #20
ToiletBrew
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 8
Default

I am not into specific gravity and all that, so forgive my countertop brewing.

I have five gallons that I am going to ferment to about 16-18% or as high as the EC1118 will get it.
Then back sweeten with honey, not much, but just a little. I will let this sit in the big jug to make sure it is done fermenting.
three Gal of these I will add Super smoother(oak extract and glycerin) to and bottle. I'm just gonna put it back in the plastic jugs for a few weeks.
5 liters I will put in a 5 liter oak cask that I aged some tequilla in about 5 years ago. Do you think I should add the glycerin to this(obviously not the oak extract)? I don't think so. I may make this a semi-sweet wine. It might come out tasting like an apple honey bourbon.

__________________
ToiletBrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Wit hop options sendkyleanemail Recipes/Ingredients 10 03-14-2012 11:56 PM
Finishing Cider Options...? amarsolek Cider Forum 6 09-27-2010 02:36 PM
Cider Delima/Options pairing yeast with juice/fruits Hinez57SouthernScotsman Cider Forum 2 06-01-2007 12:13 PM
Cider very tart, little apple taste: options? ryan112ryan Cider Forum 6 10-19-2006 05:17 PM