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Home Brew Forums > Wine, Mead, Cider, Sake & Soda > Cider Forum > Nitrogen problem?
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Old 01-12-2013, 04:52 PM   #1
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Black cherry cider or wine= 1 gallon
D47 Yeast
58 to 64° temperature F
OG 1.092
Stalled at 1.034 and I don't think this is a pH problem?
Does Cherrywine have a lack of or too much nitrogen? Is it too late to add nitrogen if I need to?

And last question is how do I test the nitrogen level

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Old 01-12-2013, 08:28 PM   #2
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Nutrient added Badger? Could also try bringing it up a couple of degrees to kick strat those yeasties...

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Old 01-12-2013, 09:00 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WilliamSlayer
Nutrient added Badger? Could also try bringing it up a couple of degrees to kick strat those yeasties...
Zero Nutrient added
(But I forgot to mention I added a cup of brown sugar which brought that OG up to what it was)

And I brought it all the way up to 80 and I still didn't get them to kickstart so I wonder if I should bottle it at 1.034 Where it is now and just drink it like a cooler? Or if there's anything I can do to get it to ferment out dry?
There's already about 7% alcohol in there I believe and I'm wondering if I add champagne yeast if they will eat the rest of the sugar or have a hard time because of the alcohol?
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Old 01-13-2013, 01:31 AM   #4
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The other thread established that it wasn't a pH issue, you're well within D47 alcohol limits, and now higher temps don't help either, which all points towards a nutrient deficiency.

Testing for YAN (Yeast Available Nitrogen) would give a definite answer, and isn't too hard, but probably not worth your time or money unless you're a commercial operation. Here's some simple directions if you want to go the scientific route: http://www.apps.fst.vt.edu/extension.../FermNitro.pdf

Using a champagne yeast will probably finish the fermentation, but if the nutrient deficit is big enough, then it too may get stuck. Alternatively, as WilliamSlayer mentioned, just add some nutrient and maybe re-pitch some more yeast along with it. I like to use a blend of organic and inorganic nitrogen.

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Old 01-13-2013, 01:51 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LeBreton
The other thread established that it wasn't a pH issue, you're well within D47 alcohol limits, and now higher temps don't help either, which all points towards a nutrient deficiency.

Testing for YAN (Yeast Available Nitrogen) would give a definite answer, and isn't too hard, but probably not worth your time or money unless you're a commercial operation. Here's some simple directions if you want to go the scientific route: http://www.apps.fst.vt.edu/extension.../FermNitro.pdf

Using a champagne yeast will probably finish the fermentation, but if the nutrient deficit is big enough, then it too may get stuck. Alternatively, as WilliamSlayer mentioned, just add some nutrient and maybe re-pitch some more yeast along with it. I like to use a blend of organic and inorganic nitrogen.
Well the scientific route looks pretty tough just as you said.... Tomorrow I'll go to my local homebrew supply place and get some nutrient to add and see if that does anything, if not maybe I'll pitch a little EC111
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Old 01-13-2013, 01:53 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerBrigade View Post

Well the scientific route looks pretty tough just as you said.... Tomorrow I'll go to my local homebrew supply place and get some nutrient to add and see if that does anything, if not maybe I'll pitch a little EC111
Sounds like the right moves to me! :-)
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