Electric Brewing Supply 30A BCS Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Wine, Mead, Cider, Sake & Soda > Cider Forum > My Cider is too dry
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 11-26-2006, 09:13 PM   #1
psymn
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 89
Default My Cider is too dry

My first Cider turned out too dry. I used 4 gallons of organic CIder from my local grocery, and white labs English cider yeast. It tastes ok, but just too dry.

Could I use Lactose to sweeten it up a bit? How much should I use?

Is there another way to add sweetness that would not ferment out over time?

Thanks,

Matt

__________________
Inventory:

Fermenter 1: Apricot wheat, Sterling silverback

Waiting for space: Cali common; Helles 08v2,

Drinking:
Muenchner Helles 08; Daddy's alt; Rye PA 1; Rye PA 2; Amber ale; Noche Buena; Kiltish Wee Heavy; Saison; Rootbeer;
psymn is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-26-2006, 09:25 PM   #2
Yuri_Rage
Gritty.
HBT_MODERATOR.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yuri_Rage's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Southwest
Posts: 13,937
Liked 619 Times on 385 Posts
Likes Given: 56

Default

Yup, lactose is perfect for back-sweetening. To determine the amount, pour yourself a glass, add lactose by measured amounts until it suits your liking, then scale that amount up to sweeten the whole batch.

Example:
Pour an 8 oz glass of cider
Assume 1/4 oz of lactose is enough to sweeten it
5 gallons = 80 8 oz glasses
1/4 oz * 80 glasses = 20 oz of lactose

You could also use Splenda - it won't ferment, either.

__________________
Homebrewed Blog..........YouTube Channel .......... Shirts, posters, etc
Yuri_Rage is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-26-2006, 09:29 PM   #3
david_42
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
david_42's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Willamina & Oak Grove, Oregon, USA
Posts: 25,654
Liked 135 Times on 128 Posts

Default

Most of the time 8-12 oz. of lactose is plenty, but there is a much wider variation in how people detect lactose than for sucrose.

__________________

Remember one unassailable statistic, as explained by the late, great George Carlin: "Just think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of them are even stupider!"

"I would like to die on Mars, just not on impact." Elon Musk

david_42 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-26-2006, 11:11 PM   #4
psymn
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 89
Default

Thanks guys.

I will use the method Yuri spelled out.

Do I need to boil the lactose before adding it to the keg?

Matt

__________________
Inventory:

Fermenter 1: Apricot wheat, Sterling silverback

Waiting for space: Cali common; Helles 08v2,

Drinking:
Muenchner Helles 08; Daddy's alt; Rye PA 1; Rye PA 2; Amber ale; Noche Buena; Kiltish Wee Heavy; Saison; Rootbeer;
psymn is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-27-2006, 12:42 AM   #5
Yuri_Rage
Gritty.
HBT_MODERATOR.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yuri_Rage's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Southwest
Posts: 13,937
Liked 619 Times on 385 Posts
Likes Given: 56

Default

It helps to boil an amount of water about equal to the amount of lactose you're using, take it off of the heat, and dissolve the lactose in that. Let it cool a little before pouring it into the keg.

__________________
Homebrewed Blog..........YouTube Channel .......... Shirts, posters, etc
Yuri_Rage is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-27-2006, 05:17 AM   #6
unitednutter
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 3
Default

For Splenda would you use about the same amount as lactose? I'd assume you'd boil it as well?

__________________
unitednutter is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-28-2006, 04:20 PM   #7
psymn
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 89
Default

I tried both methods last night and I came to 2 conclusions:

- I can barely taste the sweetness from lactose, and it took 4-5 teaspoons to get the
desired sweetness

- splenda is far too sweet, and it lingers in your mouth like only artificially sweeteners
can.

Is there a way to kill the yeast, and back sweeten with table sugar or DME? Seems like I read somewhere there are tablets for this purpose.

Matt

__________________
Inventory:

Fermenter 1: Apricot wheat, Sterling silverback

Waiting for space: Cali common; Helles 08v2,

Drinking:
Muenchner Helles 08; Daddy's alt; Rye PA 1; Rye PA 2; Amber ale; Noche Buena; Kiltish Wee Heavy; Saison; Rootbeer;
psymn is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-28-2006, 05:00 PM   #8
rod
beer -just brew it
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
rod's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: brantford,ontario
Posts: 1,226
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

to kill the yeast add 1 campden tablet(potassium metabisulphite) per gallon and 2/3 teaspoon
of potassium sorbate per 5 gallons* after stirring vigorously to release the c02
let sit for a week or two, rack off the yeast ans sweeten with sugar or another can of apple juice concentrate.
i will be doing this to my cider in another 2 weeks.
good luck

* i got this info from a previous post and hope it is correct

__________________

simplified signature:
beer, wine, cheese in various stages of production


rod is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-28-2006, 09:32 PM   #9
Caplan
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,165
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by psymn
I tried both methods last night and I came to 2 conclusions:

- I can barely taste the sweetness from lactose, and it took 4-5 teaspoons to get the
desired sweetness

- splenda is far too sweet, and it lingers in your mouth like only artificially sweeteners
can.

Is there a way to kill the yeast, and back sweeten with table sugar or DME? Seems like I read somewhere there are tablets for this purpose.

Matt
If you don't want to carbonate it by priming the remaining yeast then use campden and sorbate as Rod mentioned and then sweeten with sugar/apple concentrate - NOT DME. Malt and cider don't mix well.
__________________
Caplan is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-28-2006, 09:40 PM   #10
Hermish
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 267
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

I have a cider that is too dry also, and I have already added about 8 oz of lactose. It has been sitting in a keg in the fridge at about 40 degrees for about 3 weeks, and I was wondering if the yeast is dead by now, and if I can just add regular sugar now to sweeten it. So does anyone have an idea if the yeast would die after that amount of time. I was very surprised how dry my cider turned out, I used Ed's recipe, but used an Ale yeast with it.

__________________

Hermish is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Noob cider help... How long do you generally ferment Cider? unclejimbay Cider Forum 9 01-27-2012 08:20 PM
What is Cider, as opposed to Wine?/Quince Cider critique petes Cider Forum 16 08-31-2011 06:17 PM
Cider discussion. Hopping and other cider additions. Ciderguy Cider Forum 1 01-17-2009 04:03 AM
Backsweetening cider with frozen sweet cider benjita Cider Forum 12 01-14-2009 02:11 AM