The Great Bottle Opener Giveaway

Home Brew Forums > Wine, Mead, Cider, Sake & Soda > Cider Forum > My 1st cider and it made my entire basement smell like eggs

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 08-20-2009, 08:46 PM   #1
ananimity
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: usa
Posts: 7
Default My 1st cider and it made my entire basement smell like eggs

start date 7/12/09
5 gal cider no pres/not pasturized
1# extra DME
2 cups brown sugar
1 cup cane sugar
2 1/2 tsp tanin
2 1/2 tsp pectin
2 1/2 tsp yeast energizer

mixed together in primary and added 5 campden tablets
S.G. 1.072

7/13/09
added yeast starter(lalvin 1118)

7/17/09
S.G. 1.020 racked into carboy
added 2 cups cane sugar

8/01/09
S.G. .996

8/03/09
S.G. .996
added 5 campden tabs and 1 tsp sorbate

8/05/09
added super-kleer k.c.
which didnt seem to do anything
yes i followed the directions to the T

I let sit to clear for 15 days

8/15/09 today!
I desided to rack again to clear. When I took off the air lock OMG!
I about gagged, the rotten eggs smell! I about dumped it out then and there.
But i thought I would see what you all have to say 1st.

__________________
ananimity is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-20-2009, 09:03 PM   #2
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 60,044
Liked 4202 Times on 3059 Posts
Likes Given: 779

Default

Sounds like H2S- hydrogen sulfide. That usually is the death of wine or cider, but you can try a few things first. What happens is that if the H2S remains dissolved in the wine, it will react with Alcohol to form Mercaptans, which in turn will form disulfides and polydisulfides, which are almost impossible to remove from the finished wine.

First, try splash racking. That is racking to another container, letting it splash down the sides so it can "knock out" some of the H2S gas. If it's early, that might save it. After that, add 5 crushed campden tablets to counteract the aeration that you just did.

The cause of H2S is usually because of a lack of nutrients, or leaving the wine/cider on the lees too long.

__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006
Yooper is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-20-2009, 10:41 PM   #3
ananimity
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: usa
Posts: 7
Default

I think it was both Yooper. I used energizer not nutrient. I dont know why I did that.
I have been stiring it for the past 2hrs. I can smell a faint apple smell behind the egg smell. Is there anything I can add to get rid of the H2S gas, or is my batch wasted?
I poured it into my 5 gal bucket to splash/stir it. When it settles there are little white floaties. Almost like very small dandruff flakes. What is that? and is it a byproduct of sitting on the lees to long?

__________________
ananimity is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-20-2009, 10:43 PM   #4
ananimity
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: usa
Posts: 7
Default

And yooper, what part of upper MI are you from? Im in Lansing, and travel as far north for work as Claire and Midland

__________________
ananimity is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-20-2009, 11:51 PM   #5
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 60,044
Liked 4202 Times on 3059 Posts
Likes Given: 779

Default

I live in the central UP- on the border of Wisconsin. I'm about 150 miles north of Green Bay.

I don't know what the white floaties are- probably yeast or even some precipitates from the pectin from the apple juice. That shouldn't be a problem.

Is the H2S smell fading?

__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006
Yooper is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-21-2009, 12:53 AM   #6
ananimity
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: usa
Posts: 7
Default

Well after splashing/stiring for over 2hrs, the egg smell is still strong but i can now smell a faint apple smell. I will purchase a drill spinner attachment if you think using it will help. Or am I just spinning my wheels and this batch is dead. The whole problem started when my local brew store owner told me not to rack till I cant see any little bubbles. Well I still saw little bubbles today when I racked, I was unaware that leaving the must on the lees would cause this issue. Again is there anything I can add to my cider to get rid of the odor?

__________________
ananimity is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-21-2009, 12:59 AM   #7
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 60,044
Liked 4202 Times on 3059 Posts
Likes Given: 779

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ananimity View Post
Well after splashing/stiring for over 2hrs, the egg smell is still strong but i can now smell a faint apple smell. I will purchase a drill spinner attachment if you think using it will help. Or am I just spinning my wheels and this batch is dead. The whole problem started when my local brew store owner told me not to rack till I cant see any little bubbles. Well I still saw little bubbles today when I racked, I was unaware that leaving the must on the lees would cause this issue. Again is there anything I can add to my cider to get rid of the odor?
I'd stop stirring it now- I'd hate to ruin it by aerating it too much. Go ahead and add the campden, let it sit and see where you are in a few days.

There some extreme measures for getting rid of H2S (like this from Jack Keller):
How to Treat Hydrogen-Sulphide

Hydrogen sulfide does much more than impart off-smells and flavors to wine. Hydrogen sulfide can be detected by smell in quantities as low as 2 parts per billion. It can usually be dissipated during the first 2-3 weeks after its production begins by racking and aerating the wine. After several weeks, it tends to react with other components in the wine to form less volatile mercaptans, which themselves can be further oxidized to disulfides. These latter compounds are almost impossible to remove from wine by stripping methods, and their presence in the wine makes it undrinkable. Both mercaptans and disulfides have a notable skunk-like smell.

Hydrogen sulfide is usually formed after fermentation has concluded and detected when the wine is racked. If the hydrogen sulfide has not sat in the wine too long, it can be treated with a maximum measure of 0.5 ppm of copper, the amount contained in 0.75 ml of a 1% solution of copper sulfate pentahydrate added to a gallon of wine. The hydrogen sulfide should be gone within two days and the wine can be treated normally. However, it will take about 3 rackings, 20-30 days apart, to remove all excess copper from the wine. If not removed, the copper itself can taint the wine.

The amounts of copper sulfate pentahydrate used are so small, and the risks to fatally damaging the wine by adding too much are so real, that it is impractical to treat small amounts (less than 5 gallons) of wine. The preferred treatment is still to add sulfur dioxide in the form of potassium metabisulfite solution (see Measuring Additives in Winemaking) and then rack the wine with plenty of aeration to drive off the H2S.

A proprietary compound called Sulfex can also be used to treat hydrogen sulfide formation. It comes as a 10% slurry in water and is added to wine at the rate of 0.5-5 grams per gallon. It is insoluble and settles out without leaving any traces in the wine if subsequently racked properly at least twice. I have never used it but have heard it works well.

I wouldn't attempt the copper- it seems like the cure would be worse than the problem. But I just wanted to post what I've read from an expert.
__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006
Yooper is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-24-2009, 08:51 PM   #8
ananimity
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: usa
Posts: 7
Default

Hey Yooper
I read some were that some clerafying agents could cause that smell. Do you have any thoughts on that? Also a store I stoped at today in Saginaw called J D Carlson and asked about the smell. They told him Bosk Skin(what ever that is) would work, but they dont sell it. I cant find it online anywhere. Have you heard of that and do think it would work. If so where can i get it?

__________________
ananimity is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-24-2009, 09:47 PM   #9
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 60,044
Liked 4202 Times on 3059 Posts
Likes Given: 779

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ananimity View Post
Hey Yooper
I read some were that some clerafying agents could cause that smell. Do you have any thoughts on that? Also a store I stoped at today in Saginaw called J D Carlson and asked about the smell. They told him Bosk Skin(what ever that is) would work, but they dont sell it. I cant find it online anywhere. Have you heard of that and do think it would work. If so where can i get it?
I've never had a problem with any clarifying agents causing a bad smell. I don't typicallyl use them, though, unless I have a wine that just won't clear.

I've never heard of Bosk Skin, so I have no idea if that will work or not.
__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006
Yooper is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-24-2009, 09:53 PM   #10
whalenutz
Senior Member
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
whalenutz's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Anchorage
Posts: 258
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default H2s

hello everyone,
I work in a field where H2S is such a bad gas to be dealing with, the PEL is 20PPM, and we are told that when you can no longer smell then you are dead from exposure, now how the hell did everyone come up with this H2S smell, because the only place that i run into the stuff is dealing with crude oil. who said this was H2S??? i need answers????
H2S is spelled Hydrogen Sulfide not sulphide

__________________
whalenutz is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
First Cider - Smells Like rotten Eggs!!! HELP! brewdragon Cider Forum 16 11-11-2012 01:01 AM
Has homebrewing made you more sensitive to the taste and the smell of beers? BarleyAndApple Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 14 10-22-2009 09:11 PM
cider smell piranesi General Beer Discussion 4 12-01-2008 02:58 AM
Cider smell? Filter General Techniques 7 06-16-2008 08:26 AM
cider smell? Fillabong Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 4 04-20-2005 11:28 PM