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Old 02-21-2010, 05:35 PM   #1
brobins
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Default Looking for a light, crisp summer cider recipe..

Hi there...

I am new to home brewing and have recently just bottled my first batch of Lager but I have ended up with 35 spare 330ml bottles left over so would like to try and make a simple cider.. Something light, crisp and summery that will get me through the World Cup

I have seen a recipe called 'Turbo Cider' which basically just uses Apple Juice and Yeast.. Is it really this simple?

Many Thanks

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Old 02-21-2010, 06:37 PM   #2
LightningInABottle
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Yes it is that simple!!! I'm not sure what kind of yeast you can get a hold of where you live, but s-04, us-05 or Notty are good choices for a basic cider. If you can get non-pasturized non-preserved cider you can even just throw an airlock on it and let the wild yeasts do their thing.

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Old 02-21-2010, 07:02 PM   #3
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Hi, thank you, I plan on getting this started asap..

I can get hold of a Cider Yeast from the Online Store I use but the sachet is for producing 5 Gallons! As I only plan on producing half this amount can I save half the yeast or does it need using up?

Also, when I get to the bottling stage, how do I know how much sugar to add to ensure a carbonated cider? I used Coopers Carbonation Drops for my Lager, could I also use these for the Cider?

Many Thanks

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Old 02-21-2010, 08:41 PM   #4
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I just made my first cider from juice, added a champagne yeast(Higher alcohol tolerance I was told) and fermented it out in 5 days. Temperature I am afraid was way over 30c. It is Australia after all and I never use temp control. It does not seem to affect my beer so I do not worry about it.

Anyway back to the Cider, I placed it in a fridge to chill for a couple of days and obviously longer would let the Cider clear better. I fermented it under pressure and it was carbinated when chilled(OZtops) but I would think priming when bottling would work. I would use a Pet bottle until you are confident it would not turn into a bottle bomb. I am contimplating using one of my TAD bottles to ferment a batch as I have found a top that fits. It is only a 15psi one but that should give enough fiz. I should only need the two soda bombs to dispense it.
As per my signature shows I am rapt with my Tap A Draft system. I took it to a birthday party recently and were the guys impressed. Wait till I show up with Cider on tap.

The resulting Cider is really dry but a small drop of lemonade changes that. It certainly has a kick to it.

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Old 02-21-2010, 09:22 PM   #5
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I used Red Star Premier Cuvee with just fresh apple juice and it finished pretty quick, about a week. I waited two weeks to bottle it just to be safe, I didn't have hydrometer at the time. I never even gave it a chance to age, it was all gone in a month. I'm sure it would have been better with a little aging. I've read that using a champagne-style yeast like that will give you smaller bubbles when it's carbonated, with a crisper feel. I didn't know to pay attention at the time, I read that after the fact. It does finish fast though, with that yeast. In addition to typical bottling sugar for carbonation, I snuck in some Splenda to sweeten it, since it's non-fermentable. The only people that "noticed" the Splenda are the people I told about the Splenda. Everyone else loved it.

I've got some of that yeast left over, I think I'm going to make another batch this week, now that I have a better idea what I'm doing, and try to age it with some toasted french oak I have.

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Old 02-21-2010, 09:25 PM   #6
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You could use 1/2 the yeast, but there is nothing wrong with using the whole pack on the batch.

carbing cider is tricky. Depends on how far you let it ferment. If you plan to use carb drops then you will have to let it ferment all the way down. Otherwise it becomes a game of testing what level of carbonation it has before the bottles blow up real good. Cider that hasnt fermented out all the way has alot of sugar left...

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Old 02-21-2010, 09:42 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vespa2t View Post
You could use 1/2 the yeast, but there is nothing wrong with using the whole pack on the batch.

carbing cider is tricky. Depends on how far you let it ferment. If you plan to use carb drops then you will have to let it ferment all the way down. Otherwise it becomes a game of testing what level of carbonation it has before the bottles blow up real good. Cider that hasnt fermented out all the way has alot of sugar left...

A hydrometer is only a couple of Euros. I used to be one of those people who would spend $20, $30, $40 on ingredients per batch of brew, but couldn't justify a $5 hydrometer. I finally justified it on a whim. Until you have one, you are only guessing. Using a wine yeast on just apple juice (no other added sugar) is a pretty safe bet that it will be dry in 2 weeks max, assuming you follow the directions for that particular yeast.


To the OP, and off-topic, what did you think about the carb pellets? I've heard mixed reviews, they certainly would be convenient. My LHBS gal told me "I stock them because people buy them" which tells me she doesn't approve.
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Old 02-22-2010, 12:43 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fletch78 View Post
A hydrometer is only a couple of Euros. I used to be one of those people who would spend $20, $30, $40 on ingredients per batch of brew, but couldn't justify a $5 hydrometer. I finally justified it on a whim. Until you have one, you are only guessing. Using a wine yeast on just apple juice (no other added sugar) is a pretty safe bet that it will be dry in 2 weeks max, assuming you follow the directions for that particular yeast.
Using a hydrometer is the only way to ferement, otherwise its all just guessing.
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Old 02-23-2010, 10:02 AM   #9
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Hi guys, thanks for all the comments..

I like the idea of the Champagne Yeast with smaller bubbles so I may give that a go..

I have a Hydrometer but my knowledge and confidence is still low as I am a self confessed newbie

So here is my plan, I would appreciate it if you could please point out any possible flaws..

Empty 13 Litres of 100% Apple Juice to the fermentation vessel and pitch a sachet of Champagne Yeast and take the SG…

Add the airlock…

Add the heating belt around the vessel to achieve around 22c (without the belt the temp is around 15c)…

Leave it for a couple of weeks and take a Hydrometer reading, and again the day after, (once the Hydrometer reading is consistent over a couple of days it has stopped fermenting?)..

Bottle using half a teaspoon of sugar per bottle (330ml) and leave for a couple of weeks…

If I have anything out of line here or should be doing anything different please let me know )

Many Thanks,

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Old 02-23-2010, 10:30 AM   #10
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Wine yeasts and champagne yeasts can tolerate much lower temperatures than beer yeasts. My experience with cider suggests lower temperatures means a cleaner ferment. Fermentation takes longer but conditioning takes less time. I treat mine like lagers.

I would recommend using some yeast nutrient like diammonium phosphate and fermenting around 14 -15 degrees Celsius. If you are able, cold condition the cider for a week or more once primary ferment is complete. This means placing the fermenter in a fridge at around 2 degrees C.

Do not be tempted to bottle early. If you are kegging you can stop ferment early. if you are bottling, the only way to achieve this is with sulphites which I hate (I can taste them and they make hangovers terrible for me).

Champagne yeast will ferment the cider bone dry. If you want a slightly sweeter cider you can play around with other yeasts or you can add some lactose in at the beginning of fermentation. You can back sweeten with lactose or apple juice too - I prefer to do it at the start. If you use lactose, boil it up with some water and allow it to cool before you add it.

Generally ciders require some ageing (read months) before they taste good although I've found slower ferment plus cold conditioning makes drinkable cider happen much sooner.

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