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Old 08-08-2014, 09:10 PM   #1
worlddivides
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Default Lactobacillus in cider

Just out of interest... I know that usually when there is lactobacillus in beer, it is considered an infection and a bad thing (obviously the main exceptions being when someone is purposefully making a traditional sour beer). But I believe that lactobacillus has been much more traditionally used in ciders than in beers.

If you make a cider with some kind of yeast (beer, wine, cider, etc.) and you get a lactobacillus infection, what are the positives and negatives?

And before anyone asks, no, I don't think my cider is infected with lactobacillus, but I am very interested in this bacteria that is traditionally used for so many awesome things like yogurt, cheese, sour beers, and for this thread, cider.

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Old 08-09-2014, 06:39 AM   #2
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You need to google malolactic fermentation (MLF). Lactobacillus is one of a group called Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB). Cider has a lot of malic acid, LAB convert malic acid to Lactic acid which, unlike beer, actually reduces the acidity of cider. You can buy MLF cultures which are strains of oenococcus oeni, these are the preferred strains for wine and cider. MLF will also happen naturally with less predictable results, though natural MLF is usually fine.

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Old 08-09-2014, 09:20 AM   #3
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If your cider has a low ph, say below 3 and is too sharp then it can help round it out as greg says it converts malic to lactic and so raises the ph a bit. If your cider has too high a ph, say over 3.8 or so then it probably won't be beneficial

this is a decent site for cider making
http://www.cider.org.uk

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Old 08-09-2014, 05:36 PM   #4
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Thanks very much for the answers! I was actually reading about Lactic Acid Bacteria in a more "scientific range" right before posting this thread (not specifically in regards to cider or alcoholic beverages), but I didn't find any of the info about the bacteria lowering acidity. Very useful to know. I'll definitely keep that in mind for the future.

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Old 08-09-2014, 06:04 PM   #5
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great info in here

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