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Old 11-10-2011, 01:47 AM   #1
TheCIASentMe
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Default Honey that's not honey?

Heads up, apparently cheap honey might contain undesirables. Sorry if this is a repost.

http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2011/11/tests-show-most-store-honey-isnt-honey/

The cheap off-brand and some name brand honeys are apparently microfiltered which suggests they're hiding something. I don't know how this would affect brewing but it's something to think about.



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Old 11-10-2011, 02:55 AM   #2
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I used SAMs Club honey to brew up 30 gallons of mead for a medieval-themed dinner, and it worked out ok. I couldn't taste anything off.



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Old 11-10-2011, 03:03 AM   #3
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Removing the pollen removes the protein that the yeast would use for growth. A little extra nutrient would take care of that. Filtering results in a more uniform product, which is good if you are running millions of pounds of it. As far as the FDA saying it isn't honey without pollen, they also say tomato catchup without sucrose isn't catchup.

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Old 11-10-2011, 03:08 AM   #4
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http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f30/do-you-use-real-honey-279925/

Posted it this morning

Maybe the mods can combine the threads
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Old 11-10-2011, 01:10 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShakerD View Post
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f30/do-you-use-real-honey-279925/

Posted it this morning

Maybe the mods can combine the threads
My bad, we can let this one die since honey is more related to mead anyways.
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Old 11-10-2011, 02:41 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by david_42 View Post
Removing the pollen removes the protein that the yeast would use for growth. A little extra nutrient would take care of that. Filtering results in a more uniform product, which is good if you are running millions of pounds of it. As far as the FDA saying it isn't honey without pollen, they also say tomato catchup without sucrose isn't catchup.
There is actually more to it than the removal of the pollen. What they are doing is removing the pollen so the source of the honey is not as easily identified.

Why is that important? Honey from some countries is contaminated with pollutants. Most notably China. The Chinese actually are shipping their honey to other countries that do have trade agreements to export honey into the US. Once in those countries the honey is relabled as a product of that country and exported to the US. There have been some importers here in the US that have received prison terms for knowing importing contaminated honey.

Also the club someone mentioned above has sold honey that was packaged by companies that bought from these importers.

The bottom line is if you want honey for your table, to put in your wine, bake with, or to make mead from, buy it from a local producer you know and trust. It is well worth the extra cost.
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Old 11-10-2011, 03:27 PM   #7
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KC, I appreciate that as someone who produces his own honey, you would feel strongly about this, but next thing you're gonna tell us that we shouldn't brew with tap water because of the fluoride mind-control agents.

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Old 11-10-2011, 03:47 PM   #8
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Quote:
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KC, I appreciate that as someone who produces his own honey, you would feel strongly about this, but next thing you're gonna tell us that we shouldn't brew with tap water because of the fluoride mind-control agents.
Did you read the article?

because to me it looks like your trolling.

Here is a Google link to pictures of china's pollution

LINK
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Old 11-10-2011, 03:53 PM   #9
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Note that per NPR, the previously mentioned website Food Safety News is an online publication sponsored by a law firm that represents plaintiffs in food safety lawsuits.
http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2011/11/07/142097714/when-taking-the-pollen-out-of-honey-makes-a-sticky-mess

And a reply from the national honey board: http://www.honey.com/nhb/about-honey/frequently-asked-questions/#honey-filtration

"November 9, 2011

The choices consumers make today about most products, including honey, are extremely personal. In regards to honey, consumers may have varying opinions about their choice of honey type, flavor and origin. To enable a truly personal choice, there are many different kinds of honey available in the U.S. market. Some consumers prefer honey in the comb or liquid honey that is unprocessed or raw, while some prefer honey that is crystallized or cremed. Others will seek out honey that is organically produced and certified. However, the majority of honey sold at retail in the U.S. every year is the clear, golden liquid honey that has been strained or filtered.

There are a number of filtration processes that remove fine particles, including pollen, from honey - but the end result is still pure honey. Pollen particles may or may not be present in the honey an individual chooses, but the product is still honey.

Unfortunately, inaccuracies in a recent news story have fueled a considerable amount of confusion about the term “ultrafiltered honey.” Ultrafiltration is a specific process used in the food industry. When applied to honey, ultrafiltration results in a sweetener product that is not honey because of the significant changes it causes in the original honey. It is an expensive process that requires the addition of water to the honey, high pressure filtration at the molecular level, and then removal of the water. While it is known to have been used with honey overseas to create a sweetener product for beverages, ultrafiltration is not generally used in the U.S. Other filtration methods have been used for many years in the U.S. honey industry. These filtration methods are designed to remove fine particles such as bits of wax, bee parts, air bubbles and pollen that hasten crystallization of the honey and affect clarity. Recent articles have also incorrectly stated that the FDA does not consider honey without pollen to be honey - that is simply not true.
"

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Old 11-10-2011, 03:55 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DMartin View Post
KC, I appreciate that as someone who produces his own honey, you would feel strongly about this, but next thing you're gonna tell us that we shouldn't brew with tap water because of the fluoride mind-control agents.
No actually I don't have a problem with a person using what they want to brew with.

One of my problem's is that the laws we have to protect the people of this country from substances that are not good for them, are being ignored all in the name of commerce. Therefore people are buying products that the law says should be produced in a safe way but in actuallality is full of harmful substances.

I speak of honey because I know honey but this same problem extends into all parts of our commerce.


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